Were you relieved when you surrendered your GSD due to destructive behaviors - Page 2 - German Shepherd Dog Forums
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post #11 of 101 (permalink) Old 03-18-2019, 04:03 PM
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I always know where my puppy is as he's usually latched onto one of my limbs. Easy to keep track of them that way.
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post #12 of 101 (permalink) Old 03-18-2019, 04:23 PM
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The one I feel sorry for here is the dog. He's just a dog. A lot of dog, being a lot of dog. It sounds like he's in the wrong home. Maybe the OP will feel relief when the dog is rehomed, maybe the OP will feel sad. The home sounds very wrong for this dog. The dog's made no mistake, sometimes humans can learn from their errors.


I picked up a stray pup at a park. My older dog was having none of it. I took the stray pup to the humane society. They claimed he had kennel cough and were going to put him down. I reclaimed him and found him a home. The boy loved the dog - his mother wasn't so keen but agreed to it. The last I knew, it was a happy outcome but I wonder from time to time how it turned out. So - to the OPs question about your feelings - I felt responsible, I reclaimed the dog (with a tussle with the humane society), I then placed the dog. And I've wondered about that placement.. What did I feel? Sorry that I couldn't keep him but I knew that he had a better life for however long he was with that boy than had he been euthanized for non-existent kennel cough. So I had mixed feelings about it.
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post #13 of 101 (permalink) Old 03-18-2019, 04:59 PM
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"I am this close to giving mine away because of house destruction
I come home, today he has ruined the corner of a brand new hide-a-bed.
Each day i come home he has the trash scattered everywhere
Two expensive power tools he's chewed right through the cord
Ruined the corner of my wooden bed. it looks terrible now.

He's purebread, six months old and I am at my wits end. The couch this morning just set me off. I thought getting a dog would be all glamorous. Our old Aus. Shepherd was great. Nothing like this. He was pretty much autonomous. Never chewed anything other than his bone or a piece of wood.

Im afraid that after i let him go, I will think there goes the $3,000 he's cost (in vet visits, hospital bill from parvo, crate, food, etc) me right down the drain. But honestly he is a royal pain in the you know where.

Maybe this could be overcome if he acted like other dogs. IE, laid with their owners. Didnt bite them all the time. He doesnt lay with me, or on me. Constantly tries to bite me playfully. Doesnt like dog treats, will only eat human food & dog food.

I just do not know if i can take this any more. I hate to say it, but if I could go back in time & choose not to get him knowing what I know now, I absolutely positively without-question, would not have gotten him"

--------

I'm just quoting your first thread since this thread bares the same frustrated feelings and to justify my question of how you could have withstood all of that frustration without any sense of enjoyment for so long? Do you have any stories of what you taught and how that success helped you in this past year? Why did you continue to wrack up more damage expense for another year?

To be fair to all, it is reasonable to assume that a human is going to feel something at the moment of surrender no matter how they felt about the dog while it was still theirs. That said, is it fair to pose a question and expect a member to open old emotions and reply when 3 pages of previously helpful suggestions were not responded to? No judgement from me, just asking a fair and honest question as it seems this thread is just asking what the emotions were at the time of surrender. Nothing more.

Again, no judgement just how I see things.
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post #14 of 101 (permalink) Old 03-18-2019, 05:51 PM
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Could be hard to place a totally untrained, probably undersocialized young adult GSD... hope it all works out for the best.

If this is a purebred dog, please return him to the breeder. Any decent breeder will assist with rehoming or take the pup back until a home is found.

Dogs do indeed destroy stuff given a chance- because they are dogs. Some of it you train, but it's usually easiest to contain or crate the dog if you can't watch him/her. Exercise helps with yard destruction, but in my experience does nothing to reduce counter surfing or chewing unwanted items. That you either need to manage (keep dog and items separate) or watch and consistently trade/train and or correct. Most do grow out of it at 2-3 years old. But not all.

If you want to keep this dog, now is the time to seek the guidance of an experienced trainer.
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post #15 of 101 (permalink) Old 03-18-2019, 06:30 PM
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In 20 plus years of owning this breed, I have never had a PERFECT dog! Whether it's chewing out electrical sockets before I get near the front door, attempting to maim the vet or hating every dog on sight (Not the same dog!!) They have all had their issues. There is no shame in rehoming your dog as long you do it responsibly. My current girl is a rescue, someone's nightmare but a joy to me.(not PERFECT)
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post #16 of 101 (permalink) Old 03-18-2019, 07:58 PM
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We actually once owned a GSD who worked on pulling siding off soon after we brought her home. She also managed to go up the outdoor stairs to the garage apartment, boosted herself up and pulled off a row of shingles off a low-hanging span of room of the detached garage. She managed to somehow shove an enormous bottom-seat sofa cushion though the dog door to drag through the mud in the backyard when left un-crated one day. One of my chairs still has her teeth marks in the carved wood legs. She was a property-destroying monster as an adolescent. I know exactly why she was in the rescue where we found her!

OTOH, she was also the smartest GSD we've ever owned, and probably the best bred rescued dog we've owned. A knowledgeable breeder who saw her said WGSL, probably sieger grandparents, easily a $2k pup or more, twenty years ago -- he was disappointed to have not known about her in rescue as she was "special." To us she was just "our dog," and we had no information on who bred her. The reality was she was bored and too smart for her own good in her prior life. Someone up in a wealthy part of Santa Barbara dumped her -- and she made her way to breed rescue in Los Angeles, where we found her.

She needed a job and was giving herself lots of jobs -- look under the siding because there are interesting critters she can hear, and looking under shingles because the crows stash stuff under there. If your dog is pulling off siding, I'm not kidding when I say get a termite inspection....and then enroll in a nosework class!!! Or agility. Or anything you can start to engage your dog's need to puzzle out complex tasks, because THAT is what it's already doing, so find some tasks that are less expensive and more productive.

All the mischief with our dog stopped once we got serious about working with an AKC OB club, and started doing stuff with her -- exercise, adventures, classes, etc. The club had a variety of classes available. For us, their novice class was game-changing, as the lighbulb went on in her head that she was working, and she needed to work. She was a PHENOMENAL dog once she had a purpose and structure. DH even took her to work a lot of days to keep her constantly engaged, as his job allowed that. He practiced OB throughout the day at work.

So...yeah, I've actually owned that kind of dog, and no, I didn't surrender her. We got her because someone else did, and it was 100% our gain once we realized what she needed and devoted the time to her. We learned so much about being better dog owners from the challenge of fulfilling her and bringing out her potential. She was my DH's heart dog and passed of hemangio in 2012. His voice still catches when he talks about her -- she was his once-in-a-lifetime heart dog.


I sometimes wish it were possible in rescue to find the people who did the surrendering so that they would know what became of the dog. If nothing else, they'd know it ended up okay. Maybe for the next time, they'd realize what was possible with dedication and hard work. The reality of surrenders is that there's almost no way to ever find them though, so they never know if the dog ended up euthanized or with a forever home willing to give them the training and leadership they need. Our rescue has one that started out as a bit of problem-child and post-adoption earned his BH and TR1 recently...and we so wish whoever once owned him could see what a rockstar of a dog he's become with his current owner, but they'll never know.

Last edited by Magwart; 03-18-2019 at 08:24 PM.
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post #17 of 101 (permalink) Old 03-18-2019, 08:42 PM
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I sometimes wish it were possible in rescue to find the people who did the surrendering so that they would know what became of the dog. If nothing else, they'd know it ended up okay. Maybe for the next time, they'd realize what was possible with dedication and hard work. The reality of surrenders is that there's almost no way to ever find them though, so they never know if the dog ended up euthanized or with a forever home willing to give them the training and leadership they need. Our rescue has one that post-adoption earned his BH and TR1 recently...and we so wish whoever once owned him could see what a rockstar of a dog he's become, but they'll never know.
The breeder that tossed my Dane was eventually caught, in part because of her. When they contacted me prior to his hearing and asked if there was anything I wanted to said at the trial, I said tell him thanks for a great dog. In spite of everything she was a therapy dog who did amazing work, she loved her "work" days. She never met a stranger, everyone was her best friend, she helped dozens of seniors and countless children and was one of the dogs chosen for the rise above it talks to children with disabilities as she was deaf herself and had learned well over 100 different signs.
I once thought that I would love to find the folks that used to tie their dogs to my fence at night, or dump the puppies on my steps but they probably wouldn't care, Owners like the OP are exactly why no puppy or dog left my house without housetraining, leash work, crate training and basic manners. If that means they stay longer then so be it. It's the reason I will always volunteer my time to help anyone get the basics down and the reason that I hand out step by step potty and crate training advice. Lack of basic training puts too many dogs into shelters, or worse. I know it seems like common sense but some folks just cannot wrap their heads around it.
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post #18 of 101 (permalink) Old 03-18-2019, 09:35 PM
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Some people luck out & get PERFECT dogs...
They don't, though. Most of us who've had this breed for years and loved this breed for years have put TONS of work into guiding and molding them into the dogs we eventually end up with. And I think that's a large part of your problem - you expected to end up with a great dog without having to put any time and effort in. Anyone could have told you that's just not going to happen. I don't recall reading your earlier thread (thanks Heartandsoul for reposting), but I'm guessing that many people DID tell you what you needed to do.

At this point I don't blame you for wanting to give him up. I'm actually surprised it took this long. At 6 months old he sounded pretty normal for an untrained, under stimulated, unsupervised 6 month old GSD pup left to his own devices way too much, with no rules or boundaries. Totally predictable. An additional year of that, well, the outcome is exactly what I'd expect. I think the best thing for him and you would be to find a good rescue to surrender him to. It sounds like what you'll feel most is relief.

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post #19 of 101 (permalink) Old 03-18-2019, 10:15 PM
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post #20 of 101 (permalink) Old 03-19-2019, 01:53 AM
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I think if you pursue dog ownership again in the future, it would be in your best interest to choose a low energy, couch potato of a dog. I don’t think a driven breed like a German Shepherd suits your ownership style, and there’s nothing wrong with that as long as you accept it for what it is.

I have two small breed mixes that are my family dogs I grew up with. My mom let them free roam once when they were a young age. Once. Since then, they have been crated unless someone is home. They turn 15 and 14 this year and we’ve had one since 8 weeks and the other since 8 months.
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