Attacking a stranger - Page 6 - German Shepherd Dog Forums
 104Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #51 of 74 (permalink) Old 11-17-2017, 08:44 PM
Crowned Member
 
MineAreWorkingline's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 5,435
Quote:
Originally Posted by selzer View Post
I see what MAWL is saying. There is a huge difference between training your dog to be tolerant of humans, and telling humans to stay back. Especially, if we are where humans are allowed to be -- public thoroughfare. One takes responsibility for themselves and their dog's actions, the other shirks responsibility and expects the world to move over to accomodate their dog's "issues."
Thank you!

If you need equipment to maintain control of your dog, understand youíre hanging on to your dogís body because youíve lost his mind!

Suzanne Clothier
MineAreWorkingline is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #52 of 74 (permalink) Old 11-18-2017, 12:28 AM
Banned
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Dayton NV
Posts: 7,657
Quote:
Originally Posted by MineAreWorkingline View Post
Think of it this way, some people give ridiculous advice about controlling other people because they can't control their dogs while others offer constructive advice about getting a dog under control before exposing it to distractions that are beyond their and their dog's scope at the present.
Hmm the word "Stump" suddenly comes to mind.

The term I claimed, "Bubble Dog," actually was first used here as a "derogatory term" from another member with views similar to yours?? He felt that dogs that had uh "issues" should just be kept away from triggers because they can't cope, wrapped in a protective Bubble as I it were??? I liked it ... I just viewed it as a mobile bubble.


I build a dog's faith and trust in "me" by keeping "triggers" out of there freaking face! They get that, it works find with my dog and works just fine with dogs I worked with in rescue, "FEAR OF PEOPLE ISSUES" comes to mind. And with him we walked through a crowd of hundreds just fine. And if we did get stopped I would stop "Five Feet" away. And explained about him. Only had one issue when someone decide to step forward to "Pet" while I was ponder yes or no?? And the dog pressed into my thigh (I had seen no issues thus far so he was between and tigger) and I looked down and his eyes were big as saucers??? And my hand went out! Stop he's in training and we were outta there! My dogs my rules, I don't care, about people, it's my job to keep my dog safe and it's responsibility to keep "fools" from harm! And my "Bubble Dog Protocol" can do both, "Thank You" very much.


All a dog under my care, cares about is me. And it's my job to keep "People Out of There Face" if that is there issue. And they get that. I've had my share of hand picked prima donna puppies with perfect temperament ...no big deal. But not everyone starts with a "perfect pup??"

It's your "assumption" that a "Dog" with "issues" is automatically wild and out of control??? I've never had a dog with "issues" Bang against a collar??? We get our walking on a loose leash issues solved first, before they get exposed to "triggers," just to be clear.

But hey feel free to "Make Crap Up" and I will continue to "keep people out of a H/A dog's face! I will continue to use a "Muzzle" if required?? And to not do distractions and to not use treats, with dogs with "people issues." I will use stand off distance and body block as required in public if approached with questions as we work on learning to ignore people! A "Zero Bite Policy" as it were and if I get pressed hard ... yeah one would need 911! Cause my dog would suddenly become the least of there problem! I don't play, but if this is to much for folks ... then just call it a day and "Find a Trainer!"
Chip18 is offline  
post #53 of 74 (permalink) Old 11-18-2017, 12:53 AM
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2017
Location: London, Ontario
Posts: 162
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ava&Phoenix View Post
Haha. That made my day. On serious note, the lady says to me you know your dogs look really intimidating and Iím thinking but you still kept approaching when Ava was growling at you. Face palm moment.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
I haven't read the rest of the thread but still...

THIS

I have had do many times when Sitka is pooping or minding his own business and another small dog starts staring at him. Stika reacts with barking and I correct him, but the person just lets their dog bark and growl and jump, because it's small, while saying " you should control your dog: he's scary" !!! Y
es, my dog is scary ann reacting, but I am correcting him! The least you could do is walk away with your reactive dog. Please don't let your dog continue to be an ******* just because he's small! whether your dog weighs 5lbs or 150lbs, you should be trying your very best to control him/her!

"For creatures of the wild: those who ride, grow, protect, challenge, forage, and create.
For anyone inspired by owning as little as possible.
And for anyone who's touched ocean floor or mountain air and liked it."
SitkatheGSD is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #54 of 74 (permalink) Old 11-18-2017, 07:48 AM
Crowned Member
 
MineAreWorkingline's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 5,435
@ Chip People are allowed to give out advice, even if it does not agree with that of others. It is a public forum. Nobody should be cyber bullied into silence because their advice differs from that of others.

I find it very rude and insulting to be accused of making things up because I gave sound advice that would keep OP out of legal trouble.

Stop making this about you.

If you need equipment to maintain control of your dog, understand youíre hanging on to your dogís body because youíve lost his mind!

Suzanne Clothier
MineAreWorkingline is offline  
post #55 of 74 (permalink) Old 11-18-2017, 10:14 AM
Crowned Member
 
Jax08's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: NNE PA
Posts: 30,298
Obedience and desensitizing go hand in hand. You have to have the obedience in order to have the focus to work around what bothers the dog.

IMO, I would work on the obedience and relationship with the bond. I used "look at that" with my reactive dog to work her around other dogs (her trigger). But you have to teach the dogs the tools needed before you can work them around their triggers. Whatever tool you choose. I used a combination of behavior modification and corrections. NO! You will NOT behave this way! And yes, that was the right behavior! REWARD. It's a balance of timing with a fair correction and reward for the behavior I wanted.

Put the high value on interacting with you. Put a solid recall, down, sit, whatever tool you need in order to have the control in bad situations. Then, as MAWL suggested, go out and work her at a distance to the things that she's reactive too.

Isolating a dog from triggers is exhausting. It's a constant struggle to be on guard and keep triggers away. You can't control everyone and everything around you but you can control what you teach your dog.



SG Seger vom Sitz vd Hose, IPO3, AD
G Faren vom Warkonhaus, Monkey in Training
Jax08 is offline  
post #56 of 74 (permalink) Old 11-18-2017, 11:23 AM
Banned
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
Location: Dayton NV
Posts: 7,657
Quote:
Originally Posted by MineAreWorkingline View Post
@ Chip People are allowed to give out advice, even if it does not agree with that of others. It is a public forum. Nobody should be cyber bullied into silence because their advice differs from that of others.
Oh a new tactic?? OK then, I have no problem with "differences of opinion?? But I do have a problem with people making "assumptions" about how problem dog's behaved under my watch. They aren't out there barking/snarling/lunging and banging against there collar???

I should them what I want and yes, for awhile I will stop and body block as required and they "Nothing." Once they understand there is no issue here (with people) then, they get to stand beside me, and I will still stop 5 feet away and negotiation "my I Pet" if I feel the need, otherwise it's, "No I rather you did not." And my dogs do "NOTHING." It was my impression that you were implying they did something "otherwise??" If I was mistake ... then I stand corrected.



Quote:
Originally Posted by MineAreWorkingline View Post
I find it very rude and insulting to be accused of making things up because I gave sound advice that would keep OP out of legal trouble.

Stop making this about you.
I think I explained (about me???) And my legal advise, would be "to keep people out of a people issues, dog's face and one won't have a need for "legal advise."
Chip18 is offline  
post #57 of 74 (permalink) Old 11-18-2017, 11:58 AM
Crowned Member
 
MineAreWorkingline's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 5,435
Shooting the wrong messenger? I NEVER said a word about any dog "under your watch". Making things up?

Harassing innocent people in public areas is against the law.

If you need equipment to maintain control of your dog, understand youíre hanging on to your dogís body because youíve lost his mind!

Suzanne Clothier
MineAreWorkingline is offline  
post #58 of 74 (permalink) Old 11-18-2017, 12:14 PM
Crowned Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Posts: 4,421
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jax08 View Post
Obedience and desensitizing go hand in hand. You have to have the obedience in order to have the focus to work around what bothers the dog.

IMO, I would work on the obedience and relationship with the bond. I used "look at that" with my reactive dog to work her around other dogs (her trigger). But you have to teach the dogs the tools needed before you can work them around their triggers. Whatever tool you choose. I used a combination of behavior modification and corrections. NO! You will NOT behave this way! And yes, that was the right behavior! REWARD. It's a balance of timing with a fair correction and reward for the behavior I wanted.

Put the high value on interacting with you. Put a solid recall, down, sit, whatever tool you need in order to have the control in bad situations. Then, as MAWL suggested, go out and work her at a distance to the things that she's reactive too.

Isolating a dog from triggers is exhausting. It's a constant struggle to be on guard and keep triggers away. You can't control everyone and everything around you but you can control what you teach your dog.
If you stick with this A&P, you'll be fine. I've never used an actual look at that or any of the other techniques like it, but what I do thats pretty much the same thing, I don't try to convince them to not look at something and stare at me. Its just a matter of using a little distance. I find it harder to make them believe that dog over there is no big deal, then letting them figure it out for themselves. Or that woman from your first post.

As an aside, this isn't a whole lot different then anything else in life. If you go out with a chip on your shoulder, looking at everything as a confrontation, you're going to find them.

Doc

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Steve Strom is offline  
post #59 of 74 (permalink) Old 11-18-2017, 12:14 PM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Ava&Phoenix's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Posts: 44
[QUOTE=Jax08;8771618]Obedience and desensitizing go hand in hand. You have to have the obedience in order to have the focus to work around what bothers the dog.

IMO, I would work on the obedience and relationship with the bond. I used "look at that" with my reactive dog to work her around other dogs (her trigger). But you have to teach the dogs the tools needed before you can work them around their triggers. Whatever tool you choose. I used a combination of behavior modification and corrections. NO! You will NOT behave this way! And yes, that was the right behavior! REWARD. It's a balance of timing with a fair correction and reward for the behavior I wanted.

Put the high value on interacting with you. Put a solid recall, down, sit, whatever tool you need in order to have the control in bad situations. Then, as MAWL suggested, go out and work her at a distance to the things that she's reactive too.

Isolating a dog from triggers is exhausting. It's a constant struggle to be on guard and keep triggers away. You can't control everyone and everything around you but you can control what you teach your


I will do! This is great. I think Iíve been spending a little too much time at the dog park Lallygagging instead of using the time to train. Itís cold itís just easier to let them go at it. At home both are pretty close to perfect. They are Obedient and donít get into mischief much. But there are areas that Iíve already started refreshing. Iíve been working on Avaís recall since the incident and she is already better. But she does still get skittish. With her I need to incorporate more games as well. She used to be really good pretty much till we got Phoenix. Thank you. Your post is very helpful. Iím organizing it all again in my head. Canít lose the sight of the fact that itís a continuum with such young dogs.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Jax08 likes this.
Ava&Phoenix is offline  
post #60 of 74 (permalink) Old 11-18-2017, 12:15 PM Thread Starter
Junior Member
 
Ava&Phoenix's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2017
Posts: 44
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jax08 View Post
Obedience and desensitizing go hand in hand. You have to have the obedience in order to have the focus to work around what bothers the dog.

IMO, I would work on the obedience and relationship with the bond. I used "look at that" with my reactive dog to work her around other dogs (her trigger). But you have to teach the dogs the tools needed before you can work them around their triggers. Whatever tool you choose. I used a combination of behavior modification and corrections. NO! You will NOT behave this way! And yes, that was the right behavior! REWARD. It's a balance of timing with a fair correction and reward for the behavior I wanted.

Put the high value on interacting with you. Put a solid recall, down, sit, whatever tool you need in order to have the control in bad situations. Then, as MAWL suggested, go out and work her at a distance to the things that she's reactive too.

Isolating a dog from triggers is exhausting. It's a constant struggle to be on guard and keep triggers away. You can't control everyone and everything around you but you can control what you teach your dog.


Iím not sure what happened with that post. It copied and pasted your response.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Ava&Phoenix is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the German Shepherd Dog Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome