Spinning and Spinning and Spinning - Page 2 - German Shepherd Dog Forums
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post #11 of 20 (permalink) Old 01-28-2013, 12:48 AM
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Was he a spinner when you got him? Gotten worse over 2 months, or just the same, cannot fix...triggers? Have you thought about video taping, this can catch all the things you miss while doing life stuff...

Def. have a check up - but to reduce anxiety to use while conditioning, then you could try melatonin before going to prozac/valium (or xanax) extremes...as well, some amino acids, medium change triglycerides ~ coconut oil for brain, thyroid, blood sugar are mentioned in this link (Merck), it suggests common drugs as well... mentions all kinds of "disorders" so you can scroll to compulsive (more about cognitive changes in seniors so some good supplimental)

Interesting read
Behavioral Problems of Dogs: Normal Social Behavior and Behavioral Problems of Domestic Animals: Merck Veterinary Manual

He is your friend, your partner, your defender, your dog. You are his life, his love, his leader. He will be yours, faithful and true, to the last beat of his heart. You owe it to him to be worthy of such devotion. - Unknown
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post #12 of 20 (permalink) Old 01-28-2013, 01:08 AM
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I read something a long while ago that dogs can have high cholesterol and spinning an OCD behaviour is a result of that . Adding LECITHIN to diet changed that . The Dog Daily

Dog Tail-Chasing Linked to High Cholesterol

link "dogs high cholesterol and OCD spinning" and you will get pages of information.

Lecithin available in caplet or as a "pellet" which any health food or bulk food outlet will have , or found in egg yolks is good to add to diet --- as is SAMe S Adenosyl (SAMe) for Dogs and Cats by Vitality Systems

Since liver function is involved in cholesterol , I would provide a liver cleanse -- stinging nettles , dandelion, burdock, beet powder, milk thistle .

Carmen

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post #13 of 20 (permalink) Old 01-28-2013, 10:12 AM
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Originally Posted by MadLab View Post
I never seen this spinning in the flesh. I wonder can you train a dog out of that. Like give him something to do that really uses his mental energy

Do you try to do some tug or throwing a ball for the dog or is it beyond that?
Having rescued and owned a number of anxiety-ridden dogs, I'd say exercise may help a bit, but even when physically tired, these dogs manage to work themselves up into a frenzy.
You can't reach many of these dogs, once in their OCD behavior.
Separation anxiety is similar. You'd say "give them a kong toy" or some such but when they are in anxiety mode, they can't think about chewing on something or being distracted.
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post #14 of 20 (permalink) Old 03-14-2013, 12:27 PM Thread Starter
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His spinning is starting to get slightly better, after 5 months.
From what I can figure out, his spinning, seems to be when he is too stimulated. For example, he will spin when I'm around, or if he see's a person. He also spins when he is put outside with the other dogs. He also spins if he is in the open yard with no fence.
I discovered he doesn't spin if I put him, by himself, in the garage, with his dog bed, with little or no stimulation. He seems to relax in the garage, when he is alone. We made his own little yard for him so he can go out when he wants, and he doesn't spin in his little yard. However, as soon as he sees another dog, or me, he will start spinning.
So, of course, it would be cruel to leave him in the garage all the time, so we take him out for walks, and, he spin-walks. walk spin walk spin walk spin.
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post #15 of 20 (permalink) Old 03-20-2013, 10:10 AM
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I do not know if this will help but, there is an episode of Ceasar Millan where he deals with a spinning German Shepherd A Possessive Maltese and a Spinning German Shepherd | Cesar Millan

We have Netflix and this show is on it, I dont know if you can find it online somewhere. Good luck!
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post #16 of 20 (permalink) Old 03-20-2013, 10:23 AM
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There was a show about this recently on TV, there is some breed that almost always gets this OCD. There are medications that help control it and should not be too expensive.

Ruby {SG1, VP1, VP3 USCA Sieger Show, Kati Von den Oher Tannen} - Red/Black 11-15-2013
Zeus {Ymka Von den Oher Tannen, CGC} - Red/Black 01-07-2013
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post #17 of 20 (permalink) Old 03-21-2013, 03:51 PM
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I adopted a 2 year old from the shelter last month with the same problem. He would spin and try to bite his tail every time he got excited. I've had some luck stopping the behavior by interrupting it as soon as it starts, and redirecting him to another activity. At first, I wasn't able to stop him, so I left a light leash on him all day. Every time he started to spin, I'd grab the leash, stop him, and reward him when he stepped out of it. I'd then work on sit, down, or high five until he stopped spinning. He's gone from starting to spin 10-12 times a day, down to 1-2 times a day. He's also become less intense about; I don't need the leash any more, just a grab of the collar or a touch on his back, and he'll come out and focus on me.
I don't know if this will work with your dog, but I thought I'd let you know what worked for me.
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post #18 of 20 (permalink) Old 03-21-2013, 04:37 PM
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My Malinois is the spinning queen. It's become part of our communication. If I ask her if she needs to go potty, and she spins faster, that's a yes. She spins when she's excited and when she wants my interaction. But if I'm inside she turns into a normal dog and explores the back yard.

Seeing that your dog spins 8 hours a day, I realize something needs to be done. Before you try medication, try some structured training. As an experiment, next time you are home all day, once an hour (set a timer so you don't forget), go outside and spend 10 minutes doing a combination of obedience and play. Tug is a favorite of many GSD. See if doing that for a couple of days makes any change. Maybe your dog needs some structure and is not sure what he is supposed to be doing.

"And why do we fall, Bruce? So we can learn to pick ourselves up."
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post #19 of 20 (permalink) Old 03-21-2013, 04:38 PM
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Originally Posted by Mojo220 View Post
Every time he started to spin, I'd grab the leash, stop him, and reward him when he stepped out of it. I'd then work on sit, down, or high five until he stopped spinning. He's gone from starting to spin 10-12 times a day, down to 1-2 times a day.
I have also been successful with training a "stop" command. And putting a leash on my girl seems to calm her. I used to put a leash on her in the house when I was on the sofa watching TV and she would lay at my feet.

Like I said, now that she's older, she's much calmer and spins much less.

"And why do we fall, Bruce? So we can learn to pick ourselves up."
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post #20 of 20 (permalink) Old 05-13-2019, 01:11 PM
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I Agree, Leash Helps Calm Her

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Originally Posted by FlyAway View Post
I have also been successful with training a "stop" command. And putting a leash on my girl seems to calm her. I used to put a leash on her in the house when I was on the sofa watching TV and she would lay at my feet.

Like I said, now that she's older, she's much calmer and spins much less.

The leash on her while I am home with her, while in the kitchen doing dishes, watching tv in the livingroom or reading a book, seems to snap her out of this compulsive behavior. Mine acts like she is watching something , head down, then sometimes snaps or yelps at air and starts running the room in circles. Off and on she will be looking to see if I am watching her. If I say anything, she just goes faster. She even does this around the pool.
I recently moved and this started at that time.
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