Well that didn't work! The prong collar lessons - Page 7 - German Shepherd Dog Forums
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post #61 of 66 (permalink) Old 01-15-2019, 01:45 PM
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This is a great video. I like how he describes what he is doing and what his expected results are. A dog like this would have been kicked out of some of the classes we attended early on as the trainers simply donít understand this type of behavior. He notes that he may have to use a different approach to dogs with more unstable temperaments

I was taught the work a while resrbthe work a while technic he notes here. If you could spend every other day with this dog in two weeks you would have a star performer.

It takes awhile to teach a handler this.....longer than the dog.LOL.

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post #62 of 66 (permalink) Old 01-15-2019, 02:46 PM Thread Starter
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Shadow will never be a stable dog. But with improved communication and clear signals from me we make it work.
I was able to go from a dog that hated walks and suffered severe anxiety leaving her "space" to a dog that is happy and relaxed on walks.
It helped to have the forum members here that were quick to call me out on the waffling and keep me focused. Sometimes we all need a kick in the pants.

We absolutely have struggles, she hates other dogs, but last night she walked within a few feet of two barking dogs and while she wasn't happy about it she did as she was told.
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post #63 of 66 (permalink) Old 01-16-2019, 01:53 AM
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We love using the prong collar just because we don't actually have to use it. We used it with our dog for several weeks and it stopped his pulling. The thing is he will pull if he isn't wearing it. So we put it on whenever we go for a walk in addition to his other collar but we don't actually attach the leash to the prong collar. He thinks its attached though and won't pull 99% of the time. On those 1% of days when hes pulling we attach it to the softer setting for part of the walk and then when he stops being naughty its back to the normal collar. He's none the wiser.
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post #64 of 66 (permalink) Old 01-19-2019, 04:14 PM
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Rather than let the dog lunge into the prong either keep just a tiny bit of slack in the leash or get a 9-12” loop tab. It’s what I’ve used for a long time. You can keep it just barely loose then just rattle the chain with a couple fingers or if you have to just keep pressure on it. I don’t like to do it that way myself, but sometimes really high drive dogs need it to settle their nerves down.

I think most trainers will teach you to hold the leash in your right hand and use your left for the control.

I put my left hand through the handle with it folded into a slip. Then I wear an open glove year around. Often a leather one. This will prevent you from ever dropping or getting the leash pulled out of your hand. Even if you fall down the leash will not come off. All of your correction is done with your left hand while your right is ready for instant reward.

Then I keep my treats or rewards in my right pocket or right hand.

I call this a close order heel. I found it works well on almost all dogs by preventing them from getting any momentum. You can correct faster and control pressure easier.

My Aussie had never had a leash on her when I got her. She really got really frantic at first as I didn’t have a prong. We got a cheap one at the pet store for a week or so until the Herm Sprenger came from Ray Allen. I use a quick release style. Just my preference. I’ve yet to see one come loose.

I only use it maybe once a week now just to keep her sharp.

Two of the training centers We go to don’t like this but I sometimes think they never really get to see the dogs in the,last 5% of the curve. The really, really high drive, nervy dogs. These guys can be a hand full if not guided properly. I don’t think I’ve ever seen dogs like we trained in Sch. in regular obedience classes.

I also add a “watch me” command in the heel training and other training. It’s good to do this in your home first as it will be invaluable distracting the dog from outside things that provoke him. By training this you can direct the frantic dog to you for good things like treats or other rewards and keep his mind off the bad distractions until he is ready.

If you can train this in your home you have a huge advantage. Get your basics done at home then go to training classes to,proof and fine tune your training with dogs that at least are under some control.

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post #65 of 66 (permalink) Old 01-30-2019, 08:50 PM
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Having similar issues with my GSD. Three different harnesses, a gentle leader, a prong collar. So far. In the house, with any if the collars or harnesses, he lays down and looks like you've stolen his soul. But get him outside, and it's 100% panic pulling. Gentle leader. he tried to remove by somersaulting down the side walk.

We start one on one training this week. Bear is about 14 months and 80lbs. He has panosteitis that flares randomly so we have not been able to do any group classes in about 6 months. (Hope to get him into nosework, and once hes past the pano hopefully some agility). Never know when he'll be limping. He sent me literally flying once (had to pull gravel out of my palms, and hit one knee hard enough the bruising went to the sole of my foot. At 58, at least I found out I'm not too fragile &#x1f609. He needs to walk, alot, and we both need to be safe. Really hoping one on one with a trainer who loves GSDs will get us on the right path. He is not aggressive towards people or dogs. The leash just seems to flip a panic switch.
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post #66 of 66 (permalink) Old 01-30-2019, 09:40 PM Thread Starter
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Do you suppose he may associate the leash with pain?

Shadow walked in a harness for a while as a pup because she would freak out if I put her collar on. Took some thinking but I eventually realized that I had put a collar on her and hubby promptly stepped on her. Their little brains put things together weird.

Anyway, try tiring his brain out. Teach him to find things, give him puzzle toys, make him pick the correct object.
Sometimes in our trying to tire them out we end up creating super athletes and then we are stuck with dogs that need tons of activity to wear them out. Better to tire their little brains, plus it creates fun pass-times in crappy weather.
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