How heavy was/is your GSD at 6months - Page 50 - German Shepherd Dog Forums
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post #491 of 499 (permalink) Old 03-22-2017, 08:05 PM
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This is my dog, he is not obese but I do not consider him fit, his structure is sound and he shows no signs of joint strain or anything of the life. I get it, a GSD SHOULD be 66-88 lbs, he isn't, but he also likely would not be fit in those ranges, either, because with more muscle toning and less fat he would likely not lose too many lbs.
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post #492 of 499 (permalink) Old 03-22-2017, 08:19 PM
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Not so sure what the difficulty is here.

48#s - 88#s is standard.

Size/weight
Male dogs:
Height at the withers: 60 cm to 65 cm
Weight: 30 kg to 40 kg

Female dogs:
Height at the withers: 55 cm to 60 cm
Weight: 22 kg to 32 kg

http://www.fci.be/Nomenclature/Standards/166g01-en.pdf

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post #493 of 499 (permalink) Old 03-22-2017, 08:33 PM
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Originally Posted by MineAreWorkingline View Post
Not so sure what the difficulty is here.

48#s - 88#s is standard.

Size/weight
Male dogs:
Height at the withers: 60 cm to 65 cm
Weight: 30 kg to 40 kg

Female dogs:
Height at the withers: 55 cm to 60 cm
Weight: 22 kg to 32 kg

http://www.fci.be/Nomenclature/Standards/166g01-en.pdf
For dogs with proper structure. Sure.
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post #494 of 499 (permalink) Old 03-22-2017, 08:46 PM
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Originally Posted by Dracovich View Post
For dogs with proper structure. Sure.
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post #495 of 499 (permalink) Old 03-22-2017, 08:59 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MineAreWorkingline View Post
Not so sure what the difficulty is here.

48#s - 88#s is standard.

Size/weight
Male dogs:
Height at the withers: 60 cm to 65 cm
Weight: 30 kg to 40 kg

Female dogs:
Height at the withers: 55 cm to 60 cm
Weight: 22 kg to 32 kg

http://www.fci.be/Nomenclature/Standards/166g01-en.pdf
I think the confusion or issue is that not all GSD's fall into the standard. Therefore to judge all GSD's on that standard may be unfair or unrealistic. My dog's littermate was a solid 100 lb dog that competed at the USA Nationals 3 times. He is a unique exception, a rarity. Boomer was never heavier than 84lbs. His brother's legs are as thick as a woman's arm. He is a tall, lean and very muscular athletic dog. He is also 11 and I'm sure weighs under 100 lbs now.

This really shouldn't be that difficult and I've said it many times and the chart in this thread spells it out pretty well. If you run your fingers down your dogs side and it is hard to feel each rib, your dog is fat. If you can run your finger down your dog's side and can easily and distinctly feel each rib, your dog is probably at the proper weight, with out a layer of fat over them. If the ribs are really noticeable and your finger feels like it is hitting deep ruts then your dog may need to gain a lb or two.

The waist line is a good indicator as well, but not as good as seeing and feeling the ribs. GSD's should have well muscled and defined shoulders and their rear legs should be well muscled on a fit dog. You should be able to see the muscles stand out in the chest and shoulder. If you grab your dog's rear leg from behind (behind the knee, by the tail) it should be firm, solid and be a handful of muscle for a dog in peak shape. Older dogs will have less muscle mass in their rear legs.

I really do not go by the scale at all, I don't care what my dogs weigh. My ego does not ride on how big my dog is or how much my dog weighs. I go by their physical condition. I look and feel the ribs, I watch the waist line and I check on my dogs muscle mass. None of my dogs are fat, quite the opposite. The are all trim, even skinny but well muscled. Much like an Olympic Sprinter, they are athletes after all. That is what the breed was designed to be, herding dogs, working dogs and companions.

Hopefully, this thread will help some folks understand how to properly evaluate their dog's weight and learn that bigger or heavier is definitely not better. I see far too many GSD owners that do not understand how to properly gauge the right weight for their dog.
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post #496 of 499 (permalink) Old 03-22-2017, 09:08 PM
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Slamduncs comment is on point.
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post #497 of 499 (permalink) Old 03-22-2017, 09:37 PM
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Spot on as usual Slam!

I was just wondering why the normal sized GSDs as per the standard that weighed in the 48 - 66 pound range were being repeatedly excluded from desirable or acceptable size.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Slamdunc View Post
I think the confusion or issue is that not all GSD's fall into the standard. Therefore to judge all GSD's on that standard may be unfair or unrealistic. My dog's littermate was a solid 100 lb dog that competed at the USA Nationals 3 times. He is a unique exception, a rarity. Boomer was never heavier than 84lbs. His brother's legs are as thick as a woman's arm. He is a tall, lean and very muscular athletic dog. He is also 11 and I'm sure weighs under 100 lbs now.

This really shouldn't be that difficult and I've said it many times and the chart in this thread spells it out pretty well. If you run your fingers down your dogs side and it is hard to feel each rib, your dog is fat. If you can run your finger down your dog's side and can easily and distinctly feel each rib, your dog is probably at the proper weight, with out a layer of fat over them. If the ribs are really noticeable and your finger feels like it is hitting deep ruts then your dog may need to gain a lb or two.

The waist line is a good indicator as well, but not as good as seeing and feeling the ribs. GSD's should have well muscled and defined shoulders and their rear legs should be well muscled on a fit dog. You should be able to see the muscles stand out in the chest and shoulder. If you grab your dog's rear leg from behind (behind the knee, by the tail) it should be firm, solid and be a handful of muscle for a dog in peak shape. Older dogs will have less muscle mass in their rear legs.

I really do not go by the scale at all, I don't care what my dogs weigh. My ego does not ride on how big my dog is or how much my dog weighs. I go by their physical condition. I look and feel the ribs, I watch the waist line and I check on my dogs muscle mass. None of my dogs are fat, quite the opposite. The are all trim, even skinny but well muscled. Much like an Olympic Sprinter, they are athletes after all. That is what the breed was designed to be, herding dogs, working dogs and companions.

Hopefully, this thread will help some folks understand how to properly evaluate their dog's weight and learn that bigger or heavier is definitely not better. I see far too many GSD owners that do not understand how to properly gauge the right weight for their dog.

Time itself is a very powerful component of learning. So learn to wait. Learn to forgive. Learn to backup. It's all necessary for learning.

Teach! Teach! Teach! Be fair to your dog!
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post #498 of 499 (permalink) Old 03-22-2017, 09:39 PM
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Originally Posted by Slamdunc View Post
I see far too many GSD owners that do not understand how to properly gauge the right weight for their dog.
Yes. This.

In the same vein, I also see many dog owners who stick their fingers in their ears and start shouting "LA LA LA MY DOG ISN'T OBESE LA LA LA"

When the reality is they have a barrel with legs. I've seen pictures of dogs with literal fat rolls and comments from owners saying things like "He doesn't look obese to me" or "He's got a waist!" - all while their poor dog suffers, sometimes for years.
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post #499 of 499 (permalink) Old 03-23-2017, 12:09 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Slamdunc View Post
I think the confusion or issue is that not all GSD's fall into the standard. Therefore to judge all GSD's on that standard may be unfair or unrealistic. My dog's littermate was a solid 100 lb dog that competed at the USA Nationals 3 times. He is a unique exception, a rarity. Boomer was never heavier than 84lbs. His brother's legs are as thick as a woman's arm. He is a tall, lean and very muscular athletic dog. He is also 11 and I'm sure weighs under 100 lbs now.

This really shouldn't be that difficult and I've said it many times and the chart in this thread spells it out pretty well. If you run your fingers down your dogs side and it is hard to feel each rib, your dog is fat. If you can run your finger down your dog's side and can easily and distinctly feel each rib, your dog is probably at the proper weight, with out a layer of fat over them. If the ribs are really noticeable and your finger feels like it is hitting deep ruts then your dog may need to gain a lb or two.

The waist line is a good indicator as well, but not as good as seeing and feeling the ribs. GSD's should have well muscled and defined shoulders and their rear legs should be well muscled on a fit dog. You should be able to see the muscles stand out in the chest and shoulder. If you grab your dog's rear leg from behind (behind the knee, by the tail) it should be firm, solid and be a handful of muscle for a dog in peak shape. Older dogs will have less muscle mass in their rear legs.

I really do not go by the scale at all, I don't care what my dogs weigh. My ego does not ride on how big my dog is or how much my dog weighs. I go by their physical condition. I look and feel the ribs, I watch the waist line and I check on my dogs muscle mass. None of my dogs are fat, quite the opposite. The are all trim, even skinny but well muscled. Much like an Olympic Sprinter, they are athletes after all. That is what the breed was designed to be, herding dogs, working dogs and companions.

Hopefully, this thread will help some folks understand how to properly evaluate their dog's weight and learn that bigger or heavier is definitely not better. I see far too many GSD owners that do not understand how to properly gauge the right weight for their dog.
This is a great post. It makes evaluating your dog's fitness accessible to the lay person. I like to be able to see a ripple of rib when the dog moves, not starkly visible but just enough that you wonder if it was the lighting as the dog moves past you. I don't keep her there 100% of the time, but that's always where I'm aiming.

Going back to the original question, I think my girl weighed about 45-50 lb at 6 months. She was pretty tall even at 6 months, not the 24" I measured at age 11 months, but tall.
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