Okay, Who's got CATS? - Page 2 - German Shepherd Dog Forums
 8Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #11 of 18 (permalink) Old 11-27-2018, 07:04 PM
Elite Member
 
jarn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Posts: 1,570
Quote:
Originally Posted by ausdland View Post
Good luck if the cats don't stand their ground and teach the puppy to be respectful. I had to divide the house in 2 with gates as my old cat was a scaredy cat. What I would've done differently is kept my puppy crated more and on a drag line when she was out of her crate.
Yes, I was going to say, I've always had cats that were more than willing to smack the dogs around, even though I had cats before I every had dogs.

Teagan I got as an adult and she was from the get-go, and always, not safe around the small animals. I think if I'd had her from a puppy and could've shaped her behaviours it would've been different. Right now my guys are fairly cat-neutral, or nervous of them, because they know the cats will eff them up heh. Esme (who has passed on) set the tone as she'd beat the dogs for the sheer joy of it, so they learned not to step out of line (except for Luc, who adored her, and would jump on her, and then wonder why she was smacking him - we started stepping in to reign him in as it wasn't fair to her).

Keeping your puppy on a line in the house until there's a more settled environment between it and the cats should help.

Teagan RIP
Luc 15.5 yo GSD
Neb, husky/terrier/lab? X, DOB 18.4.2008
Xerxes, beagle, ~3yo
Cats Mitch RIP; Lear RIP; Esme RIP; Timothy and Cordelia
Nikolai & Eco the bunny couple extraordinaire RIP
jarn is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #12 of 18 (permalink) Old 11-27-2018, 07:26 PM
Master Member
 
Bramble's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Western, NY
Posts: 736
I don't rush the process. Puppies don't really have much in the way of impulse control. Something runs by and they chase, it's what many have been bred to do, chase the rapidly retreating object. I let my pups drag a leash when loose so I can stop chasing and I also set up a crate or ex-pen in the living room so cats can be a round the puppy and still be safe, and the puppy can get use to seeing the cats around.



I don't expect my cats to "train" the puppy. Training the puppy is my job not theirs. If it was a child I doubt anyone would recommend just letting the child teach the puppy not to chase and bite it, that would be the job or the parents not the child.
MineAreWorkingline likes this.

If all you have is a hammer, everything looks like a nail.
Bramble is offline  
post #13 of 18 (permalink) Old 11-28-2018, 09:10 AM
New Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2018
Posts: 20
No expert, but I can tell you how the process went for us.

I brought a working line puppy home to a 7 year old cat that we rescued a couple years before that. We didn't allow Kona (the pup) to harass the cat in anyway, kept her on a leash, dragging it around the house, for several months so we could intervene. Our cat pretty much ghosted the first couple of weeks anyway, only came out when Kona was crated or sleeping. Eventually though, she got more comfortable and came out more often. Pup did go through a stage around 5 or 6 months old where all she wanted to do was chase the cat. UGH. I had a few moments during that time wondering if they'd ever be able to co-exist. During this time we upped the emphasis and training on the 'leave it' command. And she always, ALWAYS, was told to leave it when it came to the cat. If she even looked at the cat and got that look in her eye like she was about to give chase, "Leave it." Treat or praise.

So we did our part best we knew how. Our cat took it from there. A couple times when Kona invaded her personal space before we could make her back off, cat gave her a bat or two with a paw and a hiss. Giving her the cat version of a warning bark to back off. Kona has generally learned to respect her space, although now and again she needs a reminder. Our cat was an adult and had come from a home with multiple dogs before we adopted her. It became pretty obvious she knew her way around a dog. Kona has never shown any aggression toward the cat, just the chase drive.

Our cat has many places to hide if she wants to be away, including access through a cat door to the basement where Kona can't follow.

Kona is almost a year now and they are not best friends, but they co-exist perfectly fine. This morning Kona was laying on the bathroom floor next to me when I was getting ready for work and my cat was laying just above her on a ledge, not even looking at one another. They will even occasionally team up. We have caught our cat a few times batting food off the table or counter top on the floor to Kona. LOL
CoffeeGirl is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #14 of 18 (permalink) Old 11-28-2018, 11:15 AM Thread Starter
Member
 
Ozymandiasmv's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2018
Location: SF Bay Area
Posts: 92
So many helpful responses. THANK YOU ALL!!

Oz
Ozymandiasmv is offline  
post #15 of 18 (permalink) Old 11-28-2018, 02:48 PM
No Stinkin' Leashes Moderator
 
Cassidy's Mom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: SF Bay Area
Posts: 31,901
It took nearly a year of work with Cassidy and kitties Elvis and then Emmylou before I was comfortable leaving them loose in the house while we were home. Never when we were gone, but to the point where I trusted them enough not to have to be in the same room, constantly supervising. It took another year to get them all close enough together at the same time to take this photo, the only one I ever got of all three of them:



It was a very painstaking process, but we finally got there. None of the other intros since then were as difficult, but we did always have a cat room protected by a baby gate as a safe place for the cats to retreat to. Definitely keep the puppy on a drag line around the house when the cats aren't closed up somewhere.

One thing I always teach a new puppy is the "find it" game, which worked great for distracting and redirecting Cassidy. I'd toss a treat on the floor and say "find it'. Once they grasped the concept I'd toss the treat further away. It's also useful for the early stages of recall training - toss the treat, "find it", then call the pups name and reward again when she gets to you. Gradually increase the distance. Rinse/repeat. Eventually, the dog will run in from another room if they hear you call "find it". If Cassidy spotted Elvis and looked like she was going to chase, I yelled "find it" and tossed a handful of tiny treats at her. They'd bounce off and land all over the floor, and she'd immediately start scarfing them up. Elvis, not being a dummy, soon figured out what that meant too, so he'd run towards her and snag a few treats for himself. The day I saw them eating treats off the floor together I knew they were going to be okay.

-Debbie-
Cava 1/6/18 *** Keefer 8/25/05
Halo 11/9/08-6/17/18 ~ You left pawprints on our hearts
Dena 9/12/04-10/4/08 ~ Forever would have been too short
Cassidy 6/8/00-10/4/04
Cassidy's Mom is offline  
post #16 of 18 (permalink) Old 11-28-2018, 03:16 PM Thread Starter
Member
 
Ozymandiasmv's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2018
Location: SF Bay Area
Posts: 92
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cassidy's Mom View Post
It took nearly a year of work with Cassidy and kitties Elvis and then Emmylou before I was comfortable leaving them loose in the house while we were home. Never when we were gone, but to the point where I trusted them enough not to have to be in the same room, constantly supervising. It took another year to get them all close enough together at the same time to take this photo, the only one I ever got of all three of them:



It was a very painstaking process, but we finally got there. None of the other intros since then were as difficult, but we did always have a cat room protected by a baby gate as a safe place for the cats to retreat to. Definitely keep the puppy on a drag line around the house when the cats aren't closed up somewhere.

One thing I always teach a new puppy is the "find it" game, which worked great for distracting and redirecting Cassidy. I'd toss a treat on the floor and say "find it'. Once they grasped the concept I'd toss the treat further away. It's also useful for the early stages of recall training - toss the treat, "find it", then call the pups name and reward again when she gets to you. Gradually increase the distance. Rinse/repeat. Eventually, the dog will run in from another room if they hear you call "find it". If Cassidy spotted Elvis and looked like she was going to chase, I yelled "find it" and tossed a handful of tiny treats at her. They'd bounce off and land all over the floor, and she'd immediately start scarfing them up. Elvis, not being a dummy, soon figured out what that meant too, so he'd run towards her and snag a few treats for himself. The day I saw them eating treats off the floor together I knew they were going to be okay.
😍😍😍

Oz
Ozymandiasmv is offline  
post #17 of 18 (permalink) Old 11-28-2018, 03:17 PM
Master Member
 
Join Date: May 2017
Posts: 561
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cassidy's Mom View Post
It took nearly a year of work with Cassidy and kitties Elvis and then Emmylou before I was comfortable leaving them loose in the house while we were home. Never when we were gone, but to the point where I trusted them enough not to have to be in the same room, constantly supervising. It took another year to get them all close enough together at the same time to take this photo, the only one I ever got of all three of them
Quoted because I do not know how to tag. Awesome post, I will be adding this game to my fun box! Love the strategy. Thank you. Also appreciate the honesty at how long of a process this was for you. It has been 4 months short of 2 years for me. While we have made huge progress, still work to do, no doubt we will get there as I figure out what works and how to teach the dog to think before reacting, make good choices.

This photo is with the kitty who is my biggest issue, she is such a tease and a young kitty. Having the dog be calm, not focused on the cat and enjoying the view was a big accomplishment for us. Also shared because I find the photo just cute.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	20181115_144832.jpg
Views:	39
Size:	75.2 KB
ID:	514751  
Apex1 is offline  
post #18 of 18 (permalink) Old 11-28-2018, 06:33 PM
No Stinkin' Leashes Moderator
 
Cassidy's Mom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: SF Bay Area
Posts: 31,901
That IS a great picture, Apex! And good for you for putting in the time and effort to get to this point. How difficult or easy it is depends on many factors, not the least is the demeanor of the cat/s. I always thought that if the cats had whacked her good even one time, it would have made a big difference but Elvis and Emmy were not inclined to do that.

Some observations from my personal experience of having cats and GSDs together for nearly 30 years (YMMV):

A dog savvy cat is going to be easier to introduce to a new dog friend than one who has never known a dog before. And as someone mentioned earlier, a cat who stands its ground fares better than one that runs since the latter is a prey object. What my cats learned is that being on the floor they were more likely to be considered prey, but once they were at eye level that was no longer the case. They would run into the room and jump up onto the coffee or side tables or onto the couch and they were suddenly her equal. It turned off her prey drive instantly.

Raising a young dog and young cat together is the easiest of all, which we were able to do with Sneaker and Punkin, but barring that, introducing a puppy to an adult cat is easier than a kitten to an adult dog. Of course that does depend on the cat and dog in question but it's a generality that has been true for me and my pets. Since Elvis and Emmy were raised with Cassidy, after she was gone things went much smoother with Dena, then Keefer, and after we lost Dena, with Halo. What was really interesting is how well they ended up learning to read Cassidy. They could somehow tell when she was more likely to chase and would keep their distance, but other times they would walk right up to her laying on the floor and start grooming her face.
Apex1 likes this.

-Debbie-
Cava 1/6/18 *** Keefer 8/25/05
Halo 11/9/08-6/17/18 ~ You left pawprints on our hearts
Dena 9/12/04-10/4/08 ~ Forever would have been too short
Cassidy 6/8/00-10/4/04
Cassidy's Mom is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the German Shepherd Dog Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Okay, you got me! MiesterBuster45 Introductions & Welcome Mat 12 01-21-2018 05:44 PM
Jif Peanutbutter okay or not okay ? ILoveBella478 General Information 7 04-14-2015 05:04 PM
What's okay and what's not okay DTS Training Theory & Methods 23 11-17-2012 11:07 PM
Okay, so I got this new camera for Christmas... StarryNite Pictures! Pictures! Pictures! 4 01-04-2010 05:43 AM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome