Why is Kira an immediate target for aggressive dogs? - German Shepherd Dog Forums
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post #1 of 30 (permalink) Old 03-10-2012, 08:02 AM Thread Starter
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Why is Kira an immediate target for aggressive dogs?

OK before anyone gets nuts, Kira was NOT attacked

However, there's behavior from dogs around her, that concern me.

I know pups and dogs give "signals", but Kira is doing something to set off aggressive dogs.

Here's what I'm talking about:

A little history...
Kira is a but skittish, and does not like to engage with older, "growly" dogs.
She plays well with balanced, younger dogs.

I finish work each day around 2:30pm. At 3pm, I'm at the dog run. I have 2 or 3 friends that I meet there, for some private play time. These dogs know each other,and get along well. A young GS, and a Boxer. I avoid the dog park scene 100%

Yesterday:

The dogs were having their daily play date, and a "dog park regular" arrived with a Yellow Lab. Since I don't want to get caught up in the dog park scene, I was about to remove Kira, and call it a day.
As SOON as that dog entered the arena, it went straight to Kira, Hacks up, growling, and it sent Kira running for cover. The owner called the dog off, I leashed Kira, and left.
It left me wondering WHY that dog zeroed in on Kira, when there were two other dogs there?

Here's a short video clip of Kira playing with her "friends". No problem here. I specifically set up her playmates, to avoid the dog park.


Here's a video capture of the Lab.
He became SO fixated on Kira, that he followed her along the fence area, in a rage.

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post #2 of 30 (permalink) Old 03-10-2012, 08:11 AM
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Interesting. I have no explaination for the behavior but I think you handled it the right way.





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post #3 of 30 (permalink) Old 03-10-2012, 08:15 AM
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I had a very similar problem with Abby for her first 2 years. She is just now having fewer problems. I think that dogs have subtle body language that we don't always pick up on, but THEY do. It is very interesting to watch, especially when a dog goes from being timid to confident in a matter of minutes ... and vice versa. But there are dogs that remain the same throughout their lives. Most of them are just responding to the 'present situation'.
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post #4 of 30 (permalink) Old 03-10-2012, 08:25 AM
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The main thing I have observed for dogs who get jumped is they often stare at the dog who jumps them. Also the calming signals thing.......just putting your dog in a sit and getting their attention can defuse a potentially volatile situation

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post #5 of 30 (permalink) Old 03-10-2012, 08:38 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jocoyn View Post
The main thing I have observed for dogs who get jumped is they often stare at the dog who jumps them. Also the calming signals thing.......just putting your dog in a sit and getting their attention can defuse a potentially volatile situation
I read the Calming Signals book, and have been paying attention, and looking for warning signs.

That dog ran across the entire run to get to her. Kira was playing with the young GS, and the Lab came right up other tail,and started biting at her side. He immediately got loud, growly, and sent Kira running for cover.
Another second, and Kira was getting it again.
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post #6 of 30 (permalink) Old 03-10-2012, 08:48 AM Thread Starter
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I want to add that I did do something AFTER the fact, and Im not sure it was the right thing to do.
After exiting the dog run, I positioned myself on the other side of the fence, and let Kira watch from outside. That Lab would continue to come over and attempt to terrorize Kira. I stayed there, thinking that it would boost Kira's confidence level, by not immediately leaving with a bad experience.
Kira was fine, and ignored the raging Lab. She laid next to me, and just watched as the Lab barked at her through the fence.

The owner of the Lab had the nerve to come over and ask me to leave, because I was "upsetting" her dog. (I'm really starting to dislike dog people). LOL.
I just smiled and asked if she was joking (sarcasm)

I left when her dog stopped coming over.
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post #7 of 30 (permalink) Old 03-10-2012, 08:58 AM
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My guess is her body language is telling them something like "here, I'm an easy target"

As far as continuing to let her watch the rabid Lab from the other side of the fence, I disagree with that. when I work with Jax on LAT, I don't use a dog that is going nuts. I want her to look at nice, calm dogs to help show her that dogs are not anything to fear. She may have been "ignoring" the Lab as an avoidance thing.

And the owner of the Lab...wth did she not come get her dog and control it? Yes, sitting outside the fence while the dog was going nuts was kind of antagonizing it but that was her chance to work with HER dog on what is obviously a reactive issue. That is her responsibility. I would have been furious if a dog had come up to Jax and started biting at her side while growling at her.

BTW...I don't consider owners like that "dog people". Dog people...true dog people...don't do that crap and don't let their dogs do that kind of stuff.




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post #8 of 30 (permalink) Old 03-10-2012, 09:36 AM
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[QUOTE=Jax08;2423940]My guess is her body language is telling them something like "here, I'm an easy target"

As far as continuing to let her watch the rabid Lab from the other side of the fence, I disagree with that. when I work with Jax on LAT, I don't use a dog that is going nuts. I want her to look at nice, calm dogs to help show her that dogs are not anything to fear. She may have been "ignoring" the Lab as an avoidance thing.

And the owner of the Lab...wth did she not come get her dog and control it? Yes, sitting outside the fence while the dog was going nuts was kind of antagonizing it but that was her chance to work with HER dog on what is obviously a reactive issue. That is her responsibility. I would have been furious if a dog had come up to Jax and started biting at her side while growling at her.

BTW...I don't consider owners like that "dog people". Dog people...true dog people...don't do that crap and don't let their dogs do that kind of stuff.[/QUOTE]

Agree! Just like bad parents let tgheir kids "get away" with crap so do doggie parents. It's always the other persons fault. I think I would have told her to control her "kujo"

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post #9 of 30 (permalink) Old 03-10-2012, 09:44 AM
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I love my rescue to death, but she is slightly off to say the least. Every dog she meets will gang up on her. It's her odd behavior that sets them off. I feel bad blaming the victim, but in my rescue's case, she invites the behavior and other dogs go after her. She definitely an easy target. She acts skittish, jumps/runs like a prey animal and has weird body signals. She was taken from her littermates too quickly so I attribute it to her never properly learning "dog interaction".

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post #10 of 30 (permalink) Old 03-10-2012, 09:45 AM
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Is she spayed? And I know she's about 10 months old correct? I think it might have to do with her coming into maturity and the other dogs have a way of sensing the adolescent and wanting to put them in their place. It's kind of a weird middle ground where they are not puppies anymore so the adult dogs don't ignore them as much, and they aren't quite adults yet so they don't stand up for themselves.

I had a short time when I went through this, but my male "manned up" quite quick and either his body language or smell changed enough for the adult dogs to stop bothering him. He went from being submissive to the big dog on campus in a few short months. I can't really say how to build her confidence as I generally didn't do anything except wait it out and made sure the other dogs weren't doing anything too bad (I know I have a different opinion of dog parks as the majority of the board, but my dog can handle it). It might also just be her general temperament, she might be a submissive dog for the rest of her life (which isn't a bad thing, I'd actually kind of prefer it). Just wait and see what she starts doing as soon as she's a little older.

Now about the spaying thing...I have noticed that Rooney can get "aggressive" towards a female in/around her heat cycle. I've seen him around a bitch that just came out of her cycle (don't know why the guy brought her to the park) and also around a bitch that I believe the owners had no idea she was in heat. He's an intact male, and as soon as he caught wind of her, he took off and had her by the neck and on the ground in seconds (I of course removed him in the next few seconds). I'd be interested to see if that might be it also.
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