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-   -   Harley Stack: (https://www.germanshepherds.com/forum/critique-my-dog/185551-harley-stack.html)

HarleyTheGSD 06-28-2012 04:50 PM

Harley Stack:
 
(Moved) I tried to stack Harley again, hopefully this one is better than the last one I posted! Please comment and give me your opinions. :D (I know I should have taken the picture outside)

https://www.germanshepherds.com/forum...-years-old.jpg

robk 06-28-2012 05:05 PM

For me a proper stack is very difficult to achieve so I want to commend you on your effort. The photo is a little blurry to me but I can still make out the general structure of the dog. His back legs are spread a little far apart and his front feet are facing out. I would try it again with his feet lined up correctly and lower your camera so that you are looking directly at the side of the dog rather than down at the dog. This will make it easier to see the total picture to compare to the standard.

TrickyShepherd 06-28-2012 05:34 PM

Robk already said it all... so I have nothing for critique. However, what has been helping me learn is to look at really great stacks often and see where they are positioned, what they look like, where the owners move the dogs to get them there (proper technique really helps and makes the dog more relaxed to stay in place, thus, giving you a much better stack). You don't want to get your dog off balance or uncomfortable... there are certain ways to grab the dogs legs and move them to keep them more stable. I also did a lot of work in front of a mirror.... that was absolutely the BEST tool I used. When I don't have the mirror, I ask someone to help me and be my eyes... my SO does a great job at that now. When trying to take a picture, I definitely advice getting help. You want the dog looking alert and forward, not at you and confused. Also, as Robk mentioned, definitely get the picture level with the dog... directly at them, this way nothing is distorted by perception the picture angle creates. (also, on the photography side, you may want to stack the dog somewhere where the color doesn't blend with hers.... you want to have your dogs color pop in the picture... not dulled by the background noise. I try to get them in fields or on concrete... lets everyone see exactly what they look like)

I'm not 100% accurate, but with all the suggestions on here and some useful techniques.... I can at least get a decent stack now. There's many great ways to learn. Just some things I learned from here that helped! =)

Btw, your dog is very cute! He looks happy to do whatever you want him to do! Duke gives me the same "what are you doing?!" look when we work on stacking... lol!

HarleyTheGSD 06-30-2012 08:56 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by robk (Post 2517597)
For me a proper stack is very difficult to achieve so I want to commend you on your effort. The photo is a little blurry to me but I can still make out the general structure of the dog. His back legs are spread a little far apart and his front feet are facing out. I would try it again with his feet lined up correctly and lower your camera so that you are looking directly at the side of the dog rather than down at the dog. This will make it easier to see the total picture to compare to the standard.

Thanks! I'll TRY to do it again the right way. Next time, I'll take the picture outside. And I could bring his left hind leg back a little more, so it's closer to his right one.

HarleyTheGSD 06-30-2012 09:03 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TrickyShepherd (Post 2517612)
Robk already said it all... so I have nothing for critique. However, what has been helping me learn is to look at really great stacks often and see where they are positioned, what they look like, where the owners move the dogs to get them there (proper technique really helps and makes the dog more relaxed to stay in place, thus, giving you a much better stack). You don't want to get your dog off balance or uncomfortable... there are certain ways to grab the dogs legs and move them to keep them more stable. I also did a lot of work in front of a mirror.... that was absolutely the BEST tool I used. When I don't have the mirror, I ask someone to help me and be my eyes... my SO does a great job at that now. When trying to take a picture, I definitely advice getting help. You want the dog looking alert and forward, not at you and confused. Also, as Robk mentioned, definitely get the picture level with the dog... directly at them, this way nothing is distorted by perception the picture angle creates. (also, on the photography side, you may want to stack the dog somewhere where the color doesn't blend with hers.... you want to have your dogs color pop in the picture... not dulled by the background noise. I try to get them in fields or on concrete... lets everyone see exactly what they look like)

I'm not 100% accurate, but with all the suggestions on here and some useful techniques.... I can at least get a decent stack now. There's many great ways to learn. Just some things I learned from here that helped! =)

Btw, your dog is very cute! He looks happy to do whatever you want him to do! Duke gives me the same "what are you doing?!" look when we work on stacking... lol!

I usually stack him and tell him to stay, then I back up and get lower to the ground to see how I did (though a mirror would be so much easier!). Looking at pictures of well stacked dogs would be a great way to see where I need to be eventually.
Thanks! That is definately him lol.

lhczth 07-03-2012 03:14 PM

How old is he before I critique? The stack isn't awful and we can get a pretty good feel for the dog's structure.

HarleyTheGSD 07-05-2012 03:10 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by lhczth (Post 2521551)
How old is he before I critique? The stack isn't awful and we can get a pretty good feel for the dog's structure.

He is 2 years old and was neutered at 6 months, which takes away some of the masculine features, muscle, and bone development.


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