Cost of dental exams - German Shepherd Dog Forums
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post #1 of 26 (permalink) Old 06-21-2019, 10:05 PM Thread Starter
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Cost of dental exams

How much do you usually pay for a full mouth cleaning with an anesthetic and scaling? Does your dentist also quote a price with extractions included? If they talk about extractions are they more likely to want to do them? Can an owner tell by inspection in advance if a tooth needs to come out?
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post #2 of 26 (permalink) Old 06-22-2019, 12:16 AM
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I don't have an answer to this particular question but can give you a tip to prevent bad teeth after a professional cleaning and that is to give him a raw turkey neck twice a week. Maybe brush his teeth after a kibble meal. Or consider a raw diet. My dogs who have been on raw never needed cleaning.
Before feeding raw some had more tartar build-up than others. I scaled their teeth myself with used tools from my own dentist. it requires some training for the dog though.
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post #3 of 26 (permalink) Old 06-22-2019, 06:28 AM
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I also don't have an answer. Both dogs of mine gnaw(ed) on antlers daily. My previous one used to do it right after his dinner meal for about 20 mins. The current one gnaws about 15 mins in the evening. My vet used to ask me, "do you brush his teeth everyday? they're so clean." His whole life I brushed his teeth a handful of times...all before he started gnawing on antlers. Had great teeth and gums 'til the day he died. At the end of his life, his teeth were a little ground down but his teeth were white, gums were healthy, and they ere functional. The current one doesn't gnaw on antlers as much as the previous one but enough so that I don't have to do anything else. Both dogs love me holding the antler for them....another bonding experience. Not saying that you should switch to antlers but it works/worked for me.
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post #4 of 26 (permalink) Old 06-22-2019, 08:30 AM
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The veterinarians all have different prices even in the same town depending on their expenses and those prices can really range. They should be able to give you a estimate of cost.


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post #5 of 26 (permalink) Old 06-22-2019, 09:57 AM
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Originally Posted by LuvShepherds View Post
How much do you usually pay for a full mouth cleaning with an anesthetic and scaling? Does your dentist also quote a price with extractions included? If they talk about extractions are they more likely to want to do them? Can an owner tell by inspection in advance if a tooth needs to come out?

There's no rhyme or reason to dental cleaning pricing. I've seen discount clinics advertise $200 without xrays, and known people to pay $500. A few years ago, I paid my regular vet (generalist) about $300 dollars for a 50 pound dog, without any discounts--they have to do bloodwork for anesthesia if none has been done withing 30 days, so I can save about $100 next time by scheduling a dental cleaning within a month of my dog's annual check-up, so that we can re-use the annual bloodwork. (My vet included xrays in that price.)

My kibble-fed dogs need cleanings about every 3-ish years so long as they're chewing trachea tubes, bully sticks, and an occasional frozen chicken thigh. We can tell when it's coming due by looking at the tartar buld-up on the back molars. I've never had one of mine need an extraction during a cleaning (we've had some tooth injuries that we dealt with separately at a vet dentist though). FWIW, little dogs seem to need them far more frequently (and some breeds of little dogs just seem to have rampant tooth issues genetically).

A vet dentist would usually charge far more for a cleaning than a generalist. However, I've had very cheap cleanings added on to other dental work at the vet dentist (e.g., if they're already going in for a root canal for a damaged tooth, if I add on a dental cleaning it's something like $100 more -- that's 100% worth doing if a dog would need a cleaning in the next year or so anyway).

I don't believe that you can necessarily look at a tooth and rule out all problems visually. When you go for a teeth cleaning yourself, they take xrays to spot cavities and other damage to your teeth -- the vet may use xrays the same way. They also may find stuff by probing during the cleaning. Theyr'e also carefully inspecting the inside of the mouth for other things (including oral cancer), which isn't usually possible during a regular exam.

Last edited by Magwart; 06-22-2019 at 10:03 AM.
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post #6 of 26 (permalink) Old 06-22-2019, 10:03 AM
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Price of the procedure tends to vary by region, and could be anywhere from $250-$1000. Some clinics have an extraction charge per tooth/tooth type while others may charge based on the general time and difficulty. If clinics vary within a smaller area it may be due to the operating procedures (basic anesthesia monitoring and general dentistry experience vs pre-op bloodwork, extensive anesthesia monitoring, dental radiograghs, and advanced dentistry experience). If a dog has really bad teeth a vet may be able to give a guesstimate on number of extractions and add that to an estimate for the cost of procedure, otherwise it can be difficult to tell exactly if extractions are needed until a dog in under anesthesia and after periodontal probing and/or dental radiograghs. Many vets I've known have been willing to call during the procedure once they've done their full exam to discuss the exact number of extractions that they would recommend to get a final appropval if its more than expected or quoted for.

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post #7 of 26 (permalink) Old 06-22-2019, 11:28 AM
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I think the "specials" on dental cleanings tend to be in Feb., if that makes any difference for anybody. It's "dental month," so it's not uncommon to see things signs or ads for 20% the procedure (i.e., excluding bloodwork and xrays) at some clinics.
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post #8 of 26 (permalink) Old 06-22-2019, 01:12 PM Thread Starter
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Ours is on the high end. More than mentioned here. Raw makes sense. I am sure the tartar is from kibble. It hasn’t gotten any worse since I took her off kibble, but I had to take away bones and chewers when she started bleeding. We weren’t sure what caused it. She has only been off kibble a few months. She has soft toys she chews on but that doesn’t stop brown tartar from forming.
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post #9 of 26 (permalink) Old 06-22-2019, 01:15 PM Thread Starter
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Price of the procedure tends to vary by region, and could be anywhere from $250-$1000. Some clinics have an extraction charge per tooth/tooth type while others may charge based on the general time and difficulty. If clinics vary within a smaller area it may be due to the operating procedures (basic anesthesia monitoring and general dentistry experience vs pre-op bloodwork, extensive anesthesia monitoring, dental radiograghs, and advanced dentistry experience). If a dog has really bad teeth a vet may be able to give a guesstimate on number of extractions and add that to an estimate for the cost of procedure, otherwise it can be difficult to tell exactly if extractions are needed until a dog in under anesthesia and after periodontal probing and/or dental radiograghs. Many vets I've known have been willing to call during the procedure once they've done their full exam to discuss the exact number of extractions that they would recommend to get a final appropval if its more than expected or quoted for.
I was quoted $800 to $1600 or more depending on extractions but that includes another complete blood panel because the one we had earlier this year is out of date. If I had known, I would have done it then. They are going to call and let us decide if any extractions are needed. If a tooth can’t be saved, we would extract, but if they aren’t sure, we won’t. Her teeth just look dirty, not decayed, but she has a few brown spots on the surface that I want removed. A year ago the vet said she didn’t need a cleaning. Since we stopped giving bones and hard chewers, the stain is worse.
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post #10 of 26 (permalink) Old 06-22-2019, 06:53 PM
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If gums bleed it's the first sign of gingivitis and she probably needs a cleaning. If her teeth are cleaned, you should be able to maintain it with meaty bones
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