Foxtails - German Shepherd Dog Forums
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #1 of 10 (permalink) Old 05-25-2019, 07:55 PM Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Posts: 119
Foxtails

This year the foxtails are EVERYWHERE!!! Except in our dog's backyard area. I went over the entire yard with a fine tooth comb today! I've been letting her out over the property that she can have access to if I let her which is probably 3 acres. But she's been getting foxtails This morning she was licking her side so I felt under her DEEP undercoat and there was a lump with a small hole. I squeezed it and pus came out and there it was - the dreaded foxtail! It's still swollen and red - if it doesn't look any better in a couple of days I will take her to the vet but I think it will clear up now. She is leaving it alone now that I got the dang foxtail out. So now I'm paranoid! I checked her over with my fingers from head to tail and found 5 foxtails on her in different areas. Mostly on her side and one where her hip meets her hind leg. So she's got to be laying down somewhere in them??
I wish I could run a comb thru her to get possible ones but I don't think a comb would go thru her thick coat.

She's just starting to blow her coat now. I brushed her really well today and got a lot of under coat.
She's 15 months old now.
I'm NOT letting her out in the larger area. She can only go in her yard and in the house. Will constant mowing and weed eating help with these things? But then they are laying on the ground right? So how would that help? OR not.
After finding that one that was deep in her that I luckily got out, now I'm scared to death to let her out anywhere. On 3 acres of hill and flat - I don't see how I can even possibly get rid of these things! Any others??? And what do you do? Any good combs out there or do you just use your hands to look for them. NONE in her paws which really surprises me.
desertsage01 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 10 (permalink) Old 05-25-2019, 09:43 PM
Moderator
 
dogfaeries's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Moore, Oklahoma
Posts: 5,156
I havenít dealt with them in my own dogs, but we used to see them a lot in grooming dogs. Mostly between their toes. Iíve removed many of them. I havenít seen them in a long time. I live in the suburbs, and most people spray the heck out of their yards.

~ Diane ~

CARLY ......... Ch. Lauremi's No Reservations (AKC GCh pointed, HIC)
SCARLET ..... Lauremi's Almost Wasn't (AKC pointed)
and absent friends... SAGE ~ Lauremi's Whim Z v Jakmar ~ AKC major ptd, HIC ~ 2010-2015
dogfaeries is offline  
post #3 of 10 (permalink) Old 05-25-2019, 11:49 PM
Elite Member
 
Join Date: May 2015
Location: Brisbane
Posts: 1,106
I've just finished dealing with this problem with my dog. I've spent over 20 hours going through my dog's coat again, and again and again. And again. Coconut oil has been my friend. I put coconut oil on my de-shedding tool and brushes, to work it through his coat. This made it easier to pull the seeds (foxtails/cobblers pegs/etc) out.

After a thorough brushing, I dipped my fingertips in coconut oil, and massaged all over Nitro's body to find the seeds. They were easier to feel than see. I bought a very fine comb, (a headlice comb for humans), also rubbed in coconut oil, to comb them out. I spent a couple of hours thoroughly going over his tail, the boney contours provided crevices for seeds to hide. I found none in Nitro's paws either.

Where any were deeply imbedded, where there was a lump, I shaved the area, washed it in a chlorehexidine solution, and applied a poultice for 24 hours. (I used Magnoplasm, used to draw splinters out of humans.) I put the Magnoplasm on the 8.3 x 6cm flexible fabric dressing and surprisingly, they stayed put. Doing this worked, and Nitro didn't have to go through the ordeal of exploratory surgery.

Every time I pulled out a seed, Nitro got a high value treat. He happily lay there for me for hours while I brushed and massaged, and dispensed treats. His coat looks and smells amazing, and feels so soft and silky after all the coconut oil and grooming. He now comes to me and 'asks' for a massage.

The preventative, I've changed where I exercise my dog.
Dunkirk is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 10 (permalink) Old 05-26-2019, 12:53 AM Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Posts: 119
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dunkirk View Post
I've just finished dealing with this problem with my dog. I've spent over 20 hours going through my dog's coat again, and again and again. And again. Coconut oil has been my friend. I put coconut oil on my de-shedding tool and brushes, to work it through his coat. This made it easier to pull the seeds (foxtails/cobblers pegs/etc) out.

After a thorough brushing, I dipped my fingertips in coconut oil, and massaged all over Nitro's body to find the seeds. They were easier to feel than see. I bought a very fine comb, (a headlice comb for humans), also rubbed in coconut oil, to comb them out. I spent a couple of hours thoroughly going over his tail, the boney contours provided crevices for seeds to hide. I found none in Nitro's paws either.

Where any were deeply imbedded, where there was a lump, I shaved the area, washed it in a chlorehexidine solution, and applied a poultice for 24 hours. (I used Magnoplasm, used to draw splinters out of humans.) I put the Magnoplasm on the 8.3 x 6cm flexible fabric dressing and surprisingly, they stayed put. Doing this worked, and Nitro didn't have to go through the ordeal of exploratory surgery.

Every time I pulled out a seed, Nitro got a high value treat. He happily lay there for me for hours while I brushed and massaged, and dispensed treats. His coat looks and smells amazing, and feels so soft and silky after all the coconut oil and grooming. He now comes to me and 'asks' for a massage.

The preventative, I've changed where I exercise my dog.

I will try the coconut oil. Does it get oily/greasy and get all over the carpet? Or does it soak in pretty good?
I need to get a comb as well. I have a brush that is supposed to get to the undercoat but it isn't. Hers is so thick!
Luckily I got the embedded one out. She allows me to check her and pull them out. Even the embedded one - she knows I'm helping her.
desertsage01 is offline  
post #5 of 10 (permalink) Old 05-26-2019, 01:46 AM
Elite Member
 
Join Date: May 2015
Location: Brisbane
Posts: 1,106
I wasn't using a lot of coconut oil, I'm guessing 1/4 teaspoon up to approximately 1/2 teaspoon per session. (My dog is oversized and has a thick, plush coat). It didn't make his coat greasy or oily, my carpet and rugs are still good. The idea isn't to produce an oil slick, think leave-in conditioning treatment.

I sectioned and back brushed small areas of his coat, then combed the back brushed sections forward in narrow rows.
Dunkirk is offline  
post #6 of 10 (permalink) Old 05-26-2019, 02:06 AM Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Posts: 119
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dunkirk View Post
I wasn't using a lot of coconut oil, I'm guessing 1/4 teaspoon up to approximately 1/2 teaspoon per session. (My dog is oversized and has a thick, plush coat). It didn't make his coat greasy or oily, my carpet and rugs are still good. The idea isn't to produce an oil slick, think leave-in conditioning treatment.

I sectioned and back brushed small areas of his coat, then combed the back brushed sections forward in narrow rows.

ok great. I'm going to try it.
desertsage01 is offline  
post #7 of 10 (permalink) Old 05-26-2019, 02:25 AM
Crowned Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2000
Location: Oregon
Posts: 15,745
I use(d) a flea comb on the lower legs especially when fox tails were a problem. Cheat grass and fox tail are two of our "nasty grasses" - medusa head, though, takes the prize for absolutely disgusting.

Two things I use for control: weed-eat and rake mow & bag pull and destroy; or poison the nasty grasses. Usually a combination. The horse gets cheat grass control for another week or two, then it's whack'em down time. Bought a wheeled weed eater this year for this & "cutting mustard". Burr buttercup is another nasty little weed. There's no whacking that - pull or spray.


Yes the seeds on these things are nasty.
middleofnowhere is offline  
post #8 of 10 (permalink) Old 05-26-2019, 02:26 AM
Member
 
Miika's Mom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: South Central Washington
Posts: 149
Nasty thing those are. I’m slowly getting rid of them in the fenced yard. Thousands of acres of it around me though. The best thing I found is to spray early so they don’t get an opportunity to even think about reproducing. Putting in a lawn will help as the grass will overpower them.

Usually I find them from chin to groin and any part that faces forward, haha. Remember to check around and behind the paw pads and in the short dense fur between the paws and the hocks.

I feel for you. I have spent hours brushing those, and their relatives, out of my girls’ coats after they decided to do a 15 minute romp.

My previous dog I used to clip 2-3 times a season (Akita/GSD) as he was always free to wander and would literally lie in the worst of it. I was late in clipping him one year and I spent days getting those imbedded, barbed seeds out of him after I clipped him.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Miika and
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Kiisa's Mom

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


BlueBelle and Beau (sister cats) and 3 Arabians
Miika's Mom is offline  
post #9 of 10 (permalink) Old 05-26-2019, 02:40 AM Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Posts: 119
Quote:
Originally Posted by middleofnowhere View Post
I use(d) a flea comb on the lower legs especially when fox tails were a problem. Cheat grass and fox tail are two of our "nasty grasses" - medusa head, though, takes the prize for absolutely disgusting.

Two things I use for control: weed-eat and rake mow & bag pull and destroy; or poison the nasty grasses. Usually a combination. The horse gets cheat grass control for another week or two, then it's whack'em down time. Bought a wheeled weed eater this year for this & "cutting mustard". Burr buttercup is another nasty little weed. There's no whacking that - pull or spray.


Yes the seeds on these things are nasty.

We are in the process of moving. At the new place they are there also but it will be much easier to control there. Flat ground. We do have horses that can take care of most of it (less acreage there) and the rest we can mow easily. Here it is nearly impossible. HILLY, and just too much space.
desertsage01 is offline  
post #10 of 10 (permalink) Old 05-26-2019, 12:43 PM Thread Starter
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2018
Posts: 119
I'm also not sure if she might have swallowed one. She's not "gagging" all the time but every now and then she'll gag once. She's eating fine, drinking, playing so I'm just watching her at this point. If she has swallowed one I think a vet visit because I've read horror stories when dogs swallow these dang foxtails.
desertsage01 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the German Shepherd Dog Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome