Why do Vets recommend Neutering so Early? - German Shepherd Dog Forums
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #1 of 22 (permalink) Old 04-25-2010, 09:21 AM Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
milkmoney11's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Michigan
Posts: 229
Why do Vets recommend Neutering so Early?

I've been reading the other neuter threads but haven't seen this answered?

I have talked to 3 different vets and ALL recommend doing it at 5 or 6 months. I told them that my breeder recommended waiting until at least a year and they all just shake their head and say "Don't wait that long".

The main reason they give is GSDs tend to be aggressive dogs when waiting too long and by doing it sooner, you curb these tendencies when if you wait until they after they appear, it becomes much harder to correct the aggressive behavior, even after neutering. I expressed concern about proper development and they all said this was basically a myth.

Is there any other "hidden" reason they suggest this. I know on here vets advice is commonly ridiculed but they do have years of education on animal wellness and I have a very hard time not taking their advice. When I have health issues, I always take my family physicians advice and he's never been wrong thus far.

Why wouldn't I do the same for my dog's doctor?

Edit: I know there are a couple other threads on this right now but I felt like I was hijacking them if I posted this question since it differs slightly.

Last edited by milkmoney11; 04-25-2010 at 09:26 AM.
milkmoney11 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 22 (permalink) Old 04-25-2010, 10:53 AM
Master Member
 
Gib Laut's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Muskoka, Ontario
Posts: 529
Quote:
Originally Posted by milkmoney11 View Post
I have a very hard time not taking their advice. When I have health issues, I always take my family physicians advice and he's never been wrong thus far.

Why wouldn't I do the same for my dog's doctor?
I have been reading about this subject for 2 years now and it's a pretty controversial one. I am on the side that does believe it has an impact on development; neutering changes hormone levels and there are physical changes associated. I have learned from events in my past that not only should I question what my vet advises me, that I should do the same for my family doctor. Unless it's an emergent situation, there is no reason I cannot make sure the advice given is really what is best for me or my dog.

Here is a review of the literature on the subject (including thoughts on why they still recommend doing the procedure so young). I found this article very helpful in making my decisions. Good luck with yours!

http://www.akcchf.org/pdfs/whitepape...iesArticle.pdf

Dexter-male, sable GSD, 2 yr. old rescue

"My impetus is an unfulfillable debt to animals
entrusted to my care before I recognized the extent of our advanced industrial and societal hypocrisy (i.e. the extent of my own ignorance and participation)."

-Euan Fingal

RIP

Kato- 12 yrs, GSD, forever my friend
Kelsey- 15 yrs, GSD, an inspiration

Last edited by Gib Laut; 04-25-2010 at 10:58 AM.
Gib Laut is offline  
post #3 of 22 (permalink) Old 04-25-2010, 11:04 AM
Crowned Member
 
Samba's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: USA
Posts: 6,601
Reasons I have heard are pet overpopulation and behavioral "problems".
No one mentions the vet only gets money if you have them do surgery.

I have never had a vet recommend altering. I had one who was very fair in describing to me both sides of the issue in my female. In retrospect, I wish I had left her intact. The vet certainly would have been supportive in that. The same vet also was supportive on waiting as long as we could on my cryptorchid dog.

My current vet never would bring up altering with me. But, I think by this point I fall in the category of "dog person" with them rather than general pet owning genre. I am not sure how he approaches the subject with pet owners.

AVMA on early spay/neuter:
Early Spay/Neuter: An Overview

Also:

Animal Welfare AVMA policy - Dog And Cat Population Control
Samba is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #4 of 22 (permalink) Old 04-25-2010, 11:07 AM
Crowned Member
 
Wolfiesmom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 4,261
I had a male intact GSD for his whole 12 years of life. He never once lifted his leg in my house, he wasn't overly aggressive, he didn't wander away, and he wasn't highly excitable. He was a perfect gentleman in every way. My new puppy won't be neutered either.
Wolfiesmom is offline  
post #5 of 22 (permalink) Old 04-25-2010, 11:23 AM
The Agility Rocks! Moderator
 
MaggieRoseLee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: Bushkill, PA (The Poconos!)
Posts: 27,477
They do it because the vast majority of us can't responsibly manage our dogs and accidental pregnancies and overpopulation are the result.

With millions of happy healthy dogs having to be killed in the USA each year due to the lack of good homes for them to live in............CLEARLY we haven't got the management down for our dogs to prevent the over population issue. So if the vets push for the spay/neuter BEFORE the pups even have a chance to breed, that helps.

Be kind of scary to know how many more millions of puppies/dogs would be killed each year if vets were NOT pushing for the early spay/neuter.




***

Miss Osin Blue Wildhaus NA NAJ NF

"Nothing new can come into your life unless you are grateful for what you already have. ~ "--- Michael Bernhard, gratitude
MaggieRoseLee is offline  
post #6 of 22 (permalink) Old 04-25-2010, 11:30 AM
Master Member
 
Gib Laut's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Muskoka, Ontario
Posts: 529
Quote:
Originally Posted by MaggieRoseLee View Post
They do it because the vast majority of us can't responsibly manage our dogs and accidental pregnancies and overpopulation are the result.

Be kind of scary to know how many more millions of puppies/dogs would be killed each year if vets were NOT pushing for the early spay/neuter.
While I respectfully agree that there are certainly many people who show the lack of responsibility needed to control pet population, I disagree that a spay/neuter all animals, especially the really young ones, attitude is the definitive response to be taken. A case by case decision based on the health and safety benefits to the animal and the living situation of the pet, seems to make more sense to me.....

Dexter-male, sable GSD, 2 yr. old rescue

"My impetus is an unfulfillable debt to animals
entrusted to my care before I recognized the extent of our advanced industrial and societal hypocrisy (i.e. the extent of my own ignorance and participation)."

-Euan Fingal

RIP

Kato- 12 yrs, GSD, forever my friend
Kelsey- 15 yrs, GSD, an inspiration
Gib Laut is offline  
post #7 of 22 (permalink) Old 04-25-2010, 12:19 PM
Banned
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Jenkintown,Pa.
Posts: 15,199
i never neutered my dogs. if i did neuter
i would wait untill he was 2 yrs. old or so. <

i beleive being intact helps with their developement. <

GSD's don't tend to be aggressive. that's to broad of a statement.
can some be more aggressive than others, sure they can. through
proper training, socializing and rearing the aggression issues can be
curbed if not eliminated. <

neutering is big bucks for he Vet. i think some might suggest
early neutering to make the money. this might be a hidden reason. <

Vets aren't being ridiculed here. people don't always
agree with the Vets advice. it's good to have 2nd opinion.
i use 2 Vets. one of our Vets has a holistic approach and
the other Vet is more traditional approach. when i don't agree
one of them i use the other one. <

you've spoken with 3 Vets. you said it's hard for you
not to take their advice. if that's so why are seeking
advice here? <



Quote:
Originally Posted by milkmoney11 View Post
I've been reading the other neuter threads but haven't seen this answered?

I have talked to 3 different vets and ALL recommend doing it at 5 or 6 months. I told them that my breeder recommended waiting until at least a year and they all just shake their head and say "Don't wait that long".

The main reason they give is GSDs tend to be aggressive dogs when waiting too long and by doing it sooner, you curb these tendencies when if you wait until they after they appear, it becomes much harder to correct the aggressive behavior, even after neutering. I expressed concern about proper development and they all said this was basically a myth.

Is there any other "hidden" reason they suggest this. I know on here vets advice is commonly ridiculed but they do have years of education on animal wellness and I have a very hard time not taking their advice. When I have health issues, I always take my family physicians advice and he's never been wrong thus far.

Why wouldn't I do the same for my dog's doctor?

Edit: I know there are a couple other threads on this right now but I felt like I was hijacking them if I posted this question since it differs slightly.
doggiedad is offline  
post #8 of 22 (permalink) Old 04-25-2010, 12:27 PM
The Agility Rocks! Moderator
 
MaggieRoseLee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: Bushkill, PA (The Poconos!)
Posts: 27,477
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gib Laut View Post
While I respectfully agree that there are certainly many people who show the lack of responsibility needed to control pet population, I disagree that a spay/neuter all animals, especially the really young ones, attitude is the definitive response to be taken. A case by case decision based on the health and safety benefits to the animal and the living situation of the pet, seems to make more sense to me.....
If you are talking about making sense, YOU ARE RIGHT! I don't spay my dogs until they are 18 months old! But that's because I AM able to be responsible and I do NOT have accidental pregnancies, or the tendency to think 'Oh puppies are so cute what will one litter matter so I will breed with my neighbors GSD and my children will get to experience the 'Miracle of Life' (and if I get $500 per puppy even better!)).

In a perfect world YOU, Gib Laut, are 100% right!!!!!!!!!!!

Problem is that the reality of the main stream world in the USA, most people don't get the overpopulation pet issue. Hence the MILLIONS of healthy and happy dogs that are killed and tossed into the trash every year.

And unfortunately, most vets see many of these unwanted pets and know the outcome of all these adorable puppies. They know that every bitch they spay and dog they neuter means they have entirely cut off THAT dogs opportunity to add to the problem.

Just hang out in the Urgent/NonUrgent Rescue site on this board, that frequently has purebred GSD's that don't get saved. Or just go to petfinder for an hour or so to be overwhelmed by the sheer (shear?) number of dogs that need homes. I heard there is one shelter in Florida that can get over 80 dogs A DAY dropped off at their facility. 80 DOGS A DAY!




***

Miss Osin Blue Wildhaus NA NAJ NF

"Nothing new can come into your life unless you are grateful for what you already have. ~ "--- Michael Bernhard, gratitude

Last edited by MaggieRoseLee; 04-25-2010 at 12:29 PM.
MaggieRoseLee is offline  
post #9 of 22 (permalink) Old 04-25-2010, 12:29 PM
Banned
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Jenkintown,Pa.
Posts: 15,199
i've never had a dog neutered and i've never
had an aggression problem or marking problem with them.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Wolfiesmom View Post
I had a male intact GSD for his whole 12 years of life. He never once lifted his leg in my house, he wasn't overly aggressive, he didn't wander away, and he wasn't highly excitable. He was a perfect gentleman in every way. My new puppy won't be neutered either.
doggiedad is offline  
post #10 of 22 (permalink) Old 04-25-2010, 12:40 PM
Crowned Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: georgia
Posts: 4,262
I think from a purely surgical perspective, neutering or spaying young (5-7 months) is a MUCH easier surgery to perform.
gagsd is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the German Shepherd Dog Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Why do you recommend Orijen and Acana over other LBP food? yoleska Diet & Nutrition 17 09-23-2015 10:06 PM
Why are vets/vet techs so loyal to Hills science diet? GoSailGo Diet & Nutrition 22 08-28-2013 03:02 PM
Cost for spaying after heat-why do some vets charge more? Blue22 Health Issues 8 12-29-2012 02:47 PM
So vets recommend not-so-great food...do dentists recommend not-so-great toothpaste? MarleyGSD Chat Room 11 11-15-2011 11:10 AM
Why do vets recommend Science Diet? JHutch Feeding Our Puppy 24 08-09-2009 07:45 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome