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-   -   Question about Command Meanings (http://www.germanshepherds.com/forum/training-theory-methods/483073-question-about-command-meanings.html)

emmers 08-26-2014 08:44 AM

Question about Command Meanings
 
This is really random (sorry if it's not in the right place; I couldn't find any other place to ask this), but I just HAVE to ask this question.

If you're training your dog as a sport prospect, I'm betting you use some German commands. You may use "sitz," "platz," "fuss," etc., am I right? So here's my question...

How did "platz" become "down" and "fuss" become "heel"? I got called out in my class last night that "platz" does NOT mean "down" (I didn't feel like going into the whole "he's a working dog, and it's become German-to-English slang for 'down'" thing) and of course "fuss" does not mean "heel." Can anyone give some insight as to how these commands came about? I don't know if there are any native Germans on this site, but if there are, your insight would be much appreciated, as well. I'm just very curious. :confused:

MichaelE 08-26-2014 09:01 AM

I don't know how the use of platz came about. Knowing more than a few words in German, I was a bit confused myself.

Maybe because niederschlagen doesn't exactly roll off the tongue for a dog command. It also has too many syllables.

To the dog, it doesn't matter. She just associates a word with an action. You could say 'chili' and teach her down.

Fuß is of course, foot as in Fußball and you want the dog at your foot when you give the command.

lhczth 08-26-2014 09:53 AM

German dog terms do not always translate cleanly to everyday terms. That became very obvious to me years ago when I asked my German neighbor to translate a breed survey. :) I know when clubs have a German judge come over who doesn't speak English they have to find a translator who knows dog stuff or the translations do not translate cleanly to English.

Fuß (fuss) is easy - foot or heel in dog training
Platz - place, spot, area, location, position, or down in dog training
Sitz - to have a seat or sit in dog training
Hier - here or come

Nice short words. I doubt there are any German speaking people on this board old enough to know when and why these particular words were chosen. ;)

emmers 08-26-2014 09:57 AM

I understand all of that, as I know a little German myself, but I was just curious about how the associations of words came about. That's all. "Fuss" makes sense, I suppose, as you're saying foot instead of heel, but that's all part of the same body area. "Platz" is the one that gets me. haha

I just didn't know if someone knew the so-called magic behind the meaning or not. I'd particularly like to know what a German thinks about it, but that may be asking a little much on this site. I don't know how many Germans actually utilize it. lol

emmers 08-26-2014 10:00 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by lhczth (Post 5946065)
German dog terms do not always translate cleanly to everyday terms. That became very obvious to me years ago when I asked my German neighbor to translate a breed survey. :) I know when clubs have a German judge come over who doesn't speak English they have to find a translator who knows dog stuff or the translations do not translate cleanly to English.

Fuß (fuss) is easy - foot or heel in dog training
Platz - place, spot, area, location, position, or down in dog training
Sitz - to have a seat or sit in dog training
Hier - here or come

Nice short words. I doubt there are any German speaking people on this board old enough to know when and why these particular words were chosen. ;)

I agree completely! Like I said in my original post, I think that a lot of it has become German-to-English slang-type words. Thanks for the insight with the German neighbor. Did he at least understand it well enough to kinda go, "Oh, well, that makes sense, too," or did he think it was a little ridiculous?

lhczth 08-26-2014 10:00 AM

I just emailed my German friend and asked. These are the words they use. They aren't something Americans made up. You can tell that to the people who were picking on you. :)

lhczth 08-26-2014 10:03 AM

When my neighbor translated the breed survey to me we had to guess at what was meant at times (especially when translating movement) since it did not translate cleanly. She is not a dog person. I now have several German speaking dog people friends so can get nice clean translations. :)

emmers 08-26-2014 10:09 AM

Thank you! You're awesome. :D I figured that they were words that Germans had come up with for the working dog training, since they seem to be used in most working venues that I've come across. I didn't mind being told that it didn't translate directly to "down"... I just didn't like that the guy felt it was necessary to call me out on it in front of lots of people. I was thinking, What does that accomplish?! Seriously!

lhczth 08-26-2014 10:24 AM

Petty and childish. No purpose in trying to belittle someone other than to make oneself feel more important. Just ignore him.

I'll let you know when I hear back from my friend.

emmers 08-26-2014 11:15 AM

That's what I thought, too... It upset me because we're supposed to be very supportive of each other in that class/club.

Thank you again for your help. (:


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