How is pet obedience training different from show training? - German Shepherd Dog Forums
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #1 of 38 (permalink) Old 04-23-2014, 11:24 AM Thread Starter
Sri
Master Member
 
Sri's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 602
How is pet obedience training different from show training?

I am certain there is a different style of training. The dog is more focused, engaged, conveys a happy, confident body movement when it is trained for competition. Can someone explain more the two styles of training?

And how about working dogs? .Is obedience taught the same way for all dogs? Is this how they used to do in old school training as well?

Last edited by Sri; 04-23-2014 at 11:27 AM.
Sri is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 38 (permalink) Old 04-23-2014, 11:34 AM
Member
 
farnln's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: NE Indiana
Posts: 156
We are working on AKC style obedience to compete. I guess the difference for me between competition & pet obedience would be the precision involved.

Example-For a 'pet' recall, as long as the dog comes in close enough to reach easily I would be satisfied. A competition recall would have to be directly in front of me & straight.

The dogs body positioning becomes much more important in competition.
farnln is offline  
post #3 of 38 (permalink) Old 04-23-2014, 12:01 PM
Crowned Member
 
DJEtzel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Kalamazoo, Michigan
Posts: 5,247
Criteria, absolutely. "pet" obedience is trained for the dog you want to live with. I like to think the accuracy for commands at home for this type of training are around 75% - you're asking for much higher criteria if you want to show and need somewhere around 99%

Danielle, owner of...
Fraggle Rock Collars & ...
Fraggle Vom Richcreek CGC CA
Red Dog's Reconnaissance Man CGC CL1-R CL1-H CL1-F CL1-S USJ
General Patton Vom Winter Storm
DJEtzel is offline  
post #4 of 38 (permalink) Old 04-23-2014, 02:12 PM
Master Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Posts: 950
It is all about having more specific standards. For competition, you get points knocked off for things like a crooked sit or giving your dog too many cues with your body language. Things that would never matter to a pet owner, but for competition they are important. I do not think it has anything to do with old school or compulsion-based training. I've seen that style of training used on both pet and show dogs.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Kaimeju is offline  
post #5 of 38 (permalink) Old 04-23-2014, 03:13 PM Thread Starter
Sri
Master Member
 
Sri's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 602
Thanks all for the explanation.

But I guess my question(which I am not able to express clearly) is: Is that happy body language because of making the training more fun? The reason i ask is I see that most pet obedience trainers just seem to make it very dry. Sit treat, or sit correct. I see a huge difference between the way of the engaging and game filled training videos of some of the top sports trainers and the regular well recommeded pet trainers.

Although I do not want that perfect sit and heel, I do want to find a more engaging trainer who understands movement and play and its impact. Am i wrong in what i am thinking or wanting that even if I do not compete? ( well i do want to do agility and tracking).

Last edited by Sri; 04-23-2014 at 03:23 PM.
Sri is offline  
post #6 of 38 (permalink) Old 04-23-2014, 03:21 PM
Crowned Member
 
DJEtzel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Kalamazoo, Michigan
Posts: 5,247
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sri View Post
Thanks all for the explanation.

But I guess my question9which I am not able to express clearly) isL I s that happy body language because of making the training more fun? The reason i ask is I see that most pet obedience trainers just seem to make it very dry. Sit treat, or sit correct. I see a huge difference from the way the engaging and game filled training videos of some of the top sports trainers and the regular well recommeded pet trainers.
People that are training to compete typically engage and DO have happier, more eager dogs because of their better training style, to build a better understanding and bond to accomplish the more reliable commands.

Danielle, owner of...
Fraggle Rock Collars & ...
Fraggle Vom Richcreek CGC CA
Red Dog's Reconnaissance Man CGC CL1-R CL1-H CL1-F CL1-S USJ
General Patton Vom Winter Storm
DJEtzel is offline  
post #7 of 38 (permalink) Old 04-23-2014, 03:30 PM
Elite Member
 
Merciel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: Philadelphia
Posts: 1,574
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sri View Post
Is that happy body language because of making the training more fun?
Sometimes. Sometimes it's because dogs selected for competition tend to be higher drive and inherently more enthusiastic about working.

There's no reason you can't use the play-based and motivational techniques to train pet dogs, though. They work perfectly well for that purpose and my experience has been that yes, you do get a happier and more engaged training partner using that approach, even if you never end up in the competition ring.

ARCHMX TDCH Pongu the Insane, CD-C, RE, RL1X6, RL2X5, RL3X2 (GSD mix, b. Apr 2010)
Crookytail the Tigerwuff, RL1, ITD (Akita mix, b. Jan 2011)
Merciel is offline  
post #8 of 38 (permalink) Old 04-23-2014, 03:31 PM
Banned
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Wisconsin
Posts: 5,130
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sri View Post
Thanks all for the explanation.

But I guess my question(which I am not able to express clearly) is: Is that happy body language because of making the training more fun? The reason i ask is I see that most pet obedience trainers just seem to make it very dry. Sit treat, or sit correct. I see a huge difference from the way the engaging and game filled training videos of some of the top sports trainers and the regular well recommeded pet trainers.
It's because manners are more important than happiness and accuracy. It's actually only recently that a happy obedience dog has been "rewarded" in the competitions as well. A decade ago, it really didn't matter how "happy" your dog looked.

For pet people...a calm dog is more important than happy obedience. And the best way to have a calm dog is to not develop drive and to teach calmly. On top of that, teaching a dog using drive, and the way many high level competitors train is extremely difficult in the sense of the coordination that is needed many times. So, in order to teach a handler how to do all that is necessary, the proper time to reward, ect, takes a lot of time and lots of lessons. It's hard to do that when the majority of people take an 8 week obedience course and never come back.
martemchik is offline  
post #9 of 38 (permalink) Old 04-23-2014, 03:56 PM
Crowned Member
 
Lilie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: South Texas
Posts: 12,391
When you are training your dog to compete, you are doing a lot of training work. Months....Years.....Your dog is going to get bored, lose interest and you will fail your dog. To keep your dog interested in the work, it has to find it rewarding.

"Pet People" (as Martemchik put it) will train their dogs through OB. It can be precise or sloppy depending on the handler. Their goal isn't to compete, it's to have a well mannered dog.

Hondo Von Dopplet L Bauernhof "Hondo"- GSD
Lilie's Tug McGraw "Tug" - Golden Retriever
Maggie - Mini Dachshund (Rescue)
Lonestar Pivo - Texas Blue Lacy
Ashe - Barn Cat
Katie / APHA
Lilie is offline  
post #10 of 38 (permalink) Old 04-23-2014, 04:09 PM
Master Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Posts: 950
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sri View Post
Thanks all for the explanation.

But I guess my question(which I am not able to express clearly) is: Is that happy body language because of making the training more fun? The reason i ask is I see that most pet obedience trainers just seem to make it very dry. Sit treat, or sit correct. I see a huge difference between the way of the engaging and game filled training videos of some of the top sports trainers and the regular well recommeded pet trainers.

Although I do not want that perfect sit and heel, I do want to find a more engaging trainer who understands movement and play and its impact. Am i wrong in what i am thinking or wanting that even if I do not compete? ( well i do want to do agility and tracking).

I think what you are seeing is a function of the trainer's skill. The enthusiasm comes from using motivation skillfully.


Sent from Petguide.com Free App


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Kaimeju is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the German Shepherd Dog Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome