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-   -   Whining like crazy on walks (http://www.germanshepherds.com/forum/training-our-puppy-basic/421321-whining-like-crazy-walks.html)

Danipants 03-08-2014 03:38 PM

Whining like crazy on walks
 
So recently the weather here has finally permitted that we can take Pike on walks. Well we've done it for about a week now just around the block not even 20 minutes and man does he whine! He whines the entire time we are walking. I've ignored it and tried positive reinforcement seeming excited and fun but he just isn't having it. He'll stop whining once were almost home but that's it. It makes walks very un-fun for me and it sounds like him. I'm not sure what to do or if it will pass eventually so any help would be greatly appreciated. I've tried treats too but he seems uninterested.
Also he's almost 12 weeks now.

Hector3 03-08-2014 03:41 PM

Have you tried draining his energy with games of fetch or tug before you exit the house?

Danipants 03-08-2014 03:59 PM

I have actually, today we played some tug before we ventured out to enjoy the sun and to no avail. We played in the snow and he's fine in the yard where he goes potty but anywhere else it's like it's torture.. I'm wondering if he's just scared? But we've been doing it pretty consistently for a while now so I was hoping the whining would quit, but every time is like it's new to him.

David Taggart 03-08-2014 04:09 PM

Quote:

I've tried treats
A treat is a reward. What you are rewarding him for?

Many people want their new dog to be a copy of their previous dog, or, at least, to match their own idea what a civilized dog should like. This disposition is very wrong and can damage a positive foundation you should lay for your puppy. Wait identifying his whining as something negative. Your dog speaks to you, and he indicates at the objects by whining, he could be just too excited about a big open world he is not afraid of. What he wants to tell you? Try to read it by listening to different intonations in his voice. Some passing people he wants to sniff, some dogs to play with, some places to search more closely. He will get used to be in a new environments (depends how often you take him to new places) and will whine only at the objects he is really excited at. What you should do - you should direct his alert. Train him to play ball and retrieve it first. Train him to find a hidden ball. Train him to find a hidden ball on a tree and indicate it with whining. Train him to find the ball in association with a particular smell and indicate it with whining. You never know, you may end up recovering clandestine burials and become a famous handler of a cadaver dog owing to his whining.

Chip18 03-08-2014 04:51 PM

The whining is telling you something?? Have you tried taking him some place new for a walk? Maybe it's a form of separation anxiety from the house? Maybe a long road trip in the car, with potty breaks in different places?

carmspack 03-08-2014 04:59 PM

if it is not pleasurable then it becomes a forced march.

Maybe you went too far when the dog was feeling off or exhausted and the dog didn't enjoy it , now anticipates the same and complains.

take the dog out , cut back , even if it is only up and down a few paces. Big fuss when out , stop and give the dog a chance to look around , then return. No fuss or excitement coming home or being home . Matter of factly give the dog some down time in the crate . That way you don't have a "trail horse running home to the stables !! " Extend distance with time.

Harry and Lola 03-08-2014 05:05 PM

Sometimes they do haven an anxiety type feeling when leaving their home - they love coming home.

Walking is essential, not only for physical exercise but also for brain exercise (all those smells), so if he is showing anxiety about leaving home, being so young now is a good time to try and get him to trust leaving because you will always return home.

Maybe start with baby steps, go for 10 minutes then return home, slowly increase your time.

You could also use distraction whilst walking, eg gently kick a soccer ball in front of you so that his focus is on that and then when you get home you could give him some off lead ball play in the backyard as a reward. (Make this soccer ball special - he only get it when you go for a walk and gets to play with it at the end of your walk - put it away otherwise)

Danipants 03-09-2014 10:51 AM

What is the strangest to me is that he goes places with me and my boyfriend all the time and never seems to have a problem (such as friends homes, relatives homes) it seems to be just on walks that he gets upset. He plays in the snow and sometimes stays outside for a while before he wants to come back in so I am hesitant to assume that its the snow making his paws cold (which was my original assumption).

I saw that one person posted that she would give treats during the walk and make it fun and positive which I have tried but he is so uninterested in. I contacted the breeder and he said that he might just be excited but it doesn't seem like that to me. Any time he wants to sniff I stop immediately and let him explore but that occasion is rare. At the moment theres not much to look at either because of the tall snow drifts lining the streets.

I am just worried because people I talk to say they've never had that problem, so now I'm thinking something is wrong and he'll never enjoy walks (I know, exaggerating but its a fear!).

I tried dragging a stick along with us (because he loves them) but he was distracted for maybe a minute before the whining continued. It was to the point that my boyfriend even said "How can you deal with this every time?" And I said I try to ignore it and positively praise when he quiets down but it just starts again.
Another reason I am so worried is because we camp and hike a lot and would bring him with us when he is older so I want him to be used to walking and exploring and hopefully enjoy those things ): .

I have thought of going somewhere away from home so at some point he can lessen his interest in getting home and maybe explore a little more.
The whole walk is about 10 minutes (like someone mentioned) so it's definitely nothing heavy. I will try the suggestion of bringing a ball to kick around and see if that helps him play while we walk and maybe cut the walk even shorter.

Thank you all for your replies by the way! I appreciate the support (:

carmspack 03-09-2014 11:07 AM

hi , Danipants , what would happen if you (in a safe spot) dropped the lead and ran ahead ? Bet the dog would start jogging to catch up with you . The increase in motion relaxes you and the dog . Let him catch up , tickle , praise , bolt out of there repeating the burst of energy . After a few times when he is in forward motion mode take up the lead and continue . Praise praise - keep him mind-active and surprised . You may catch him off guard by walking backwards . That will teach him.

The one thing I definitely would not do is this "Any time he wants to sniff I stop immediately and let him explore "

The dog is on YOUR walk , you are giving the direction . You are not going on his WALK . This stop and sniff and mark every fence post or bush are really really difficult to change and are frustrating for the handler . This shows the dog is not connected to you. You and he are in different zones.

One thing I see a lot of is people walking the dog and yacking on the cell phone . Another disconnect .

lennyb 03-09-2014 11:55 AM

Our boy did the same thing when he was younger. Turned out it was a combination of home separation and a little fear. We would just persevere thru it. We took him for walks everywhere ( up street, parks, etc) and once we got home we would then praise him. They figure things out pretty quick. He realized nothing was gonna hurt him and we always end up back at home. Long story short but now if I even head for the door he's ready to go.


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