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stmcfred 05-07-2014 09:24 AM

Going too fast
 
So I've been tracking with Lola for the last few weeks. We were finally able to make it to a class and we started the basics.

I first started with just a single track aged about 15 minutes. No corners or anything. She did great but went too fast. So we wanted to make it harder.

My trainer suggested adding a corners and letting it age longer. So the other day I did a pretty long track with 3 corners and let it age 25 minutes. She stayed on track and kept her nose down, but she went too fast.

How can I get her to slow down? Do I still need to make it harder?

lhczth 05-07-2014 09:49 AM

25 minutes is still a pretty fresh track. You might try an hour.

Serpentines, articles, circle track (they start and finish in the same location), more food, tire her out a bit before you track, longer and more corners. Make sure the track is the reward and not the end so if you are using food there should be a lot of food on the track and only a tiny ending pile for the finish.

Longer, harder tracks can help especially with experienced dogs, but they can also cause stress and fatigue making the dog faster or hectic.

stmcfred 05-07-2014 09:58 AM

Thanks!
I put plenty of treats on the track and I don't give her too much at the end. We haven't done articles yet.
I haven't tired her out before the track, but I will do that next time and see if that helps. And age it longer.




Quote:

Originally Posted by lhczth (Post 5484481)
25 minutes is still a pretty fresh track. You might try an hour.

Serpentine, articles, circle track (they start and finish in the same location), more food, tire her out a bit before you track, longer and more corners. Make sure the track is the reward and not the end so if you are using food there should be a lot of food on the track and only a tiny ending pile for the finish.

Longer, harder tracks can help especially with experienced dogs, but they can also cause stress and fatigue making the dog faster or hectic.


mspiker03 05-07-2014 01:31 PM

I am far from a tracking expert...but I did have a dog who went fast and wanted to pull like a freight train! My dog even wanted to pull/go fast after a bit of exercise. I ended up switching trainers (so I could get help more consistently, not because I didn't like trainer 1, and the new methods helped the issue).

We do a serpentine-y track (not a true serpentine, but lots of curves). I also only put 2-3 treats at the end and made the tracks longer. We actually haven't been aging the tracks (per the trainers methods) - and then Paisley is taken off leash and she gets to work at her own pace (that way she isn't pulling against the leash and building that drive/frustration to go). All of this really slowed Paisley down. She is allowed to go back over the track to get any missed treats (she usually only misses a few) and then when she stops working or I feel she has gotten all the treats, I call her back.

It was also suggested to bury the treats by poking a hole into the ground so the dog has to use her nose more (I don't do this because I can NOT miss getting any treats because of the wild animals where I am). But, I thought it was a good idea.

Gwenhwyfair 05-09-2014 12:11 PM

Ilda gets fast when there isn't any bait for many paces too. We're working on that.

Tracking in taller grass probably would be the same as poking the bait into the ground.

Interesting about letting the dog go back on the track to find missed bait. I'm curious how that works to slow the dog down?

I've been taught no going back allowed.....

mspiker03 05-09-2014 12:53 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Gwenhwyfair (Post 5496073)
Ilda gets fast when there isn't any bait for many paces too. We're working on that.

Tracking in taller grass probably would be the same as poking the bait into the ground.

Interesting about letting the dog go back on the track to find missed bait. I'm curious how that works to slow the dog down?

I've been taught no going back allowed.....


That part isn't slowing her down - that is just part of how we were taught to start out (with trainer #2). I think the letting her off leash slowed her down so she isn't always pulling against a harness or collar. I think the going back over is still because the the dog will learn to associate the track/smell with the bait.

There just seems to be various methods in how trainers like to start out dogs and this is just what we were taught. It seems to be working as she doesn't miss many on the first try.



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Gwenhwyfair 05-09-2014 01:31 PM

O.K. thanks for the reply. :)

There are a lot of different methods and I recall a link to a tracking article that discussed not using leash/collar for dogs that were getting too fast, due to the opposition reflex.

Makes sense.

My trainer said he doesn't like for the dog to get in the habit of turning around on the track so we haven't allowed any backing up for missed bait. When Ilda used to try to do that I would block her, recommand 'track' and then praise as she started moving forward again.

Also in Gary Patterson's book he mentions that sometimes missing bait is a sign that the dog is more interested in the track and scent then the bait and that's a sign they are ready to move on to more challenges.

But yes, many different methods and theories on tracking I'm coming to learn too, but no matter what it is so much fun! Ilda and I both really enjoy it. :)

'
Quote:

Originally Posted by mspiker03 (Post 5496241)
That part isn't slowing her down - that is just part of how we were taught to start out (with trainer #2). I think the letting her off leash slowed her down so she isn't always pulling against a harness or collar. I think the going back over is still because the the dog will learn to associate the track/smell with the bait.

There just seems to be various methods in how trainers like to start out dogs and this is just what we were taught. It seems to be working as she doesn't miss many on the first try.



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DTS 05-09-2014 01:40 PM

I am having the same problem. I set treats every 2 large steps and there is a 45 degree bend at the end of the track.
He still pulls like a freight train.

bill 05-09-2014 01:52 PM

Try this' don't feed the night before use smaller pieces or food show the scent pad all over like you are doing a drug search make sure the dog finds every piece before you move on'
Put the food in every footstep.Being hungry is the key! Good luck Bill

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lhczth 05-09-2014 04:09 PM

Depends on the dog. Dogs with high food drive, hunger can make them hectic.


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