German Shepherd Dog Forums

German Shepherd Dog Forums (http://www.germanshepherds.com/forum/)
-   Stories (http://www.germanshepherds.com/forum/stories/)
-   -   Rottie (http://www.germanshepherds.com/forum/stories/423122-rottie.html)

meldy 03-12-2014 09:05 AM

Rottie
 
After all my puppy homework I acquired a 5 yr old Rottweiler on the weekend from a friend who is not allowed to take her to their new rental.

Now I know this dog fairly well as her former owner is one of my best friends but I know next to nothing about the breed itself.

She's very overweight, entirely not ambitious but she'll try and keep up on my daily runs (Im only doing about 2-3km now as she tends to tap out at about 3km and I don't want her to not like going) Follows me everywhere even room to room in my house. Unsure of what to make of that...if she's just not sure where she is or if there's a bit of separation worry. Ive only had her since Saturday but she's known me for years as well.

She was owned by the same family from puppyhood so is used to kids etc but they didn't have time to do much with her so she wasn't walked and basically lived the life of a big cuddly ornament for the most part.

Has the very basics of obedience and listens most of the time. Really thinks she should be allowed to retaliate against my suicidal cat.

Her name is Cocobean (she was named by a 1 yr old) I call her Beanie

http://i894.photobucket.com/albums/a...ps74d1acba.jpg

Mister C 03-12-2014 09:18 AM

1 Attachment(s)
I love Rots. They can be really sweet dogs.

I haven't owned one but a friend/neighbor had a Rottie named Sophie. I walked my shepherd with Sophie for 12 years and got to know her pretty well. I also watched Sophie for a few days while her owner was on vacation.

From my experience, Rotties are very physically affectionate--much more so than a GSD. They will definitely follow you around and want to be in physical contact with you. They are leaners big time.

While I loved Sophie she had her issues. Besides her owner I was just about the only man she liked. She was also aggressive with small dogs and even puppies--very high prey drive. She would also eat just about anything and was constantly puking up sticks and wood chips.

Sophie crossed the bridge a few months ago. My friend just imported a Rottie pup a few days ago from Belgium. Here she is. Her name is Tootsie and she is 10 weeks old in the pic. As you can see, Tootsie is already leaning on her people. She crashed out on my foot for about 20 minutes while I chatted with her owner.

Good luck with Beanie and keep us posted. I'd keep up on the exercise and put her through some obedience training.

meldy 03-12-2014 09:30 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mister C (Post 5182154)
I love Rots. They can be really sweet dogs.

I haven't owned one but a friend/neighbor had a Rottie named Sophie. I walked my shepherd with Sophie for 12 years and got to know her pretty well. I also watched Sophie for a few days while her owner was on vacation.

From my experience, Rotties are very physically affectionate--much more so than a GSD. They will definitely follow you around and want to be in physical contact with you. They are leaners big time.

While I loved Sophie she had her issues. Besides her owner I was just about the only man she liked. She was also aggressive with small dogs and even puppies--very high prey drive. She would also eat just about anything and was constantly puking up sticks and wood chips.

Sophie crossed the bridge a few months ago. My friend just imported a Rottie pup a few days ago from Belgium. Here she is. Her name is Tootsie and she is 10 weeks old in the pic. As you can see, Tootsie is already leaning on her people. She crashed out on my foot for about 20 minutes while I chatted with her owner.

Good luck with Beanie and keep us posted. I'd keep up on the exercise and put her through some obedience training.


She doesn't eat much actually. Im going to switch her over to a raw diet (or I hope to) she's currently on SD large breed kibble.

Good to know about the leaning thing. Wasn't sure if her need to be with me/on me/around me all the time was just an insecurity thing since her whole life is now new but I guess it's a rottie thing.

Eiros 03-12-2014 09:36 AM

Congrats on taking this girl! She sounds really sweet.


Sent from Petguide.com Free App

Chip18 03-12-2014 09:38 AM

Cat dog thing you can go here for more tips :)
http://www.germanshepherds.com/forum...herd-cats.html

You still need to bond with this dog if shes following you around she might be a little stressed? Big change so give her a little time to settle in more down time quite time in her new home.

They can also be a little growlie, All the ones I've know have been way, way more growlie/talkie than any other dog I've had. Lots of my friends had them.

I find them a lot easier to get used to than a GSD myself. I find them to be a bit more laid back in comparison.

Your a good friend! :)

KZoppa 03-12-2014 09:47 AM

She's beautiful. I love Rottie's. They're pretty awesome dogs. Very into their people. They are leaners. Give them a good scratching and they'll love you forever pretty much. They a herding breed/working breed. Pretty versatile dogs when in the right hands. I don't know of any breeders who breed for more than looks anymore but I imagine they can still be found overseas pretty readily.

You say she doesn't eat much. If memory serves, rottie's are prone to thyroid problems so besides inactivity, thyroid could attribute to her being overweight. Example, Shasta, though GSD, is really lazy. She's my couch potato. Content with the short walk down to the mailbox and back. She gains weight pretty easily from inactivity and 2 cups a day. I watch her weight closely and if she starts looking a little chunky, she gets dropped to a cup a day split between her morning meal and her evening meal. Within a few days to a week, she's got her girlish figure back which is saying something because she's a pretty stocky girl. If she didn't drop the weight with the food intake change and slight increase in activity (against her will lol), she'd be checked out for possible causes as to her weight issues.

Give it a few weeks of the runs and keep an eye on her physique. Bear in mind, rottie's have more of a barrel shape to them but should have some tuck when in good bodily condition.

Mister C 03-12-2014 09:50 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by meldy (Post 5182266)
She doesn't eat much actually. Im going to switch her over to a raw diet (or I hope to) she's currently on SD large breed kibble.

Good to know about the leaning thing. Wasn't sure if her need to be with me/on me/around me all the time was just an insecurity thing since her whole life is now new but I guess it's a rottie thing.


I bet her weight issue is lack of exercise and you are addressing that. She may very well feel insecure which would increase her tendency to follow you around--but the following also shows that she is bonding to you which is great. You may also see a different dog as she adjusts to her new home.

When Sophie stayed at our house she was constantly leaning on either me or my wife. She just wasn't happy unless she was touching one of us. It made my GSD a bit jealous.

Sophie was also quite protective. We had a contractor working on our house while we watched Sophie. We warned them not to enter the house without one of us rounding Sophie up first. Well, they forgot this advice one morning. One of the guys just walked in and Sophie went on alert with a hard stare, tense body, ready to pounce. He didn't notice the big Rot that he just upset and took a step towards her. She then lunged at him growling with teethed bared. That he noticed. Fortunately, my wife was being leaned on just before this was right there. My wife leaped and tackled Sophie before she got to the contractor. They were really impressed by the whole experience and never repeated that mistake again.

Mister C 03-12-2014 09:57 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by KZoppa (Post 5182466)
I don't know of any breeders who breed for more than looks anymore but I imagine they can still be found overseas pretty readily.
...
You say she doesn't eat much. If memory serves, rottie's are prone to thyroid problems so besides inactivity, thyroid could attribute to her being overweight.

Good points. I had forgotten about Rotties having thyroid issues. Sophie had that problem too.

As for Rottie breeders my friend found a total of one breeder in the US that he could trust. Two breedings didn't "take" and he couldn't wait any longer so he found a great breeder in Belgium. Tootsie is the best example of a Rottie I have ever seen--even at 10 weeks she is confident, outgoing, affectionate and super calm. I'm really looking forward to seeing her grow up.

KZoppa 03-12-2014 10:00 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mister C (Post 5182474)
I bet her weight issue is lack of exercise and you are addressing that. She may very well feel insecure which would increase her tendency to follow you around--but the following also shows that she is bonding to you which is great. You may also see a different dog as she adjusts to her new home.

When Sophie stayed at our house she was constantly leaning on either me or my wife. She just wasn't happy unless she was touching one of us. It made my GSD a bit jealous.

Sophie was also quite protective. We had a contractor working on our house while we watched Sophie. We warned them not to enter the house without one of us rounding Sophie up first. Well, they forgot this advice one morning. One of the guys just walked in and Sophie went on alert with a hard stare, tense body, ready to pounce. He didn't notice the big Rot that he just upset and took a step towards her. She then lunged at him growling with teethed bared. That he noticed. Fortunately, my wife was being leaned on just before this was right there. My wife leaped and tackled Sophie before she got to the contractor. They were really impressed by the whole experience and never repeated that mistake again.



LOL I cant help but laugh at that. Definitely sounds like a rottie! My biological father had one named Whiskey. He came home from work one night and started to let himself in the house. Whiskey had been asleep upstairs. He got into the house, closed and locked the door behind him just in time to see this shadow on the wall at the stairs of Whiskey and heard this low growl, the kind you never want to be on the receiving end of, and he flattened against the door and called Whiskey telling him it was just him. Whiskey flew down the stairs all wiggles and happy. I loved Whiskey but certainly not a dog I'd have messed with. He was very sweet but trespass and you'd need some new body parts.

KZoppa 03-12-2014 10:02 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mister C (Post 5182570)
Good points. I had forgotten about Rotties having thyroid issues. Sophie had that problem too.

As for Rottie breeders my friend found a total of one breeder in the US that he could trust. Two breedings didn't "take" and he couldn't wait any longer so he found a great breeder in Belgium. Tootsie is the best example of a Rottie I have ever seen--even at 10 weeks she is confident, outgoing, affectionate and super calm. I'm really looking forward to seeing her grow up.



Yup. I'd found two here in the states who I would consider reliable. Neither are breeding anymore. One had health problems so couldn't handle it anymore. She still has her dogs but no longer breeding and the other seems to have just disappeared.


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 09:56 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
SEO by vBSEO 3.3.2