The two week shutdown - German Shepherd Dog Forums

Increase font size: 0, 10, 25, 50%

GermanShepherds.com is the premier German Shepherd Forum on the internet. Registered Users do not see the above ads.
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 04-25-2013, 05:39 PM   #1 (permalink)
Senior Member
 
Diesel and Lace's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: SW PA
Posts: 485
Question The two week shutdown

Some of you may have seen the trials and tribulations I have been going through in order to get home Diesel from a high kill shelter in Columbus GA 700 miles away from me. It should be noted that my determination to get this dog and what I have already gone through to this point I am preparing for the worst.

I am going to do the 2 week shutdown. This dog will need it... No doubt. He has gone through the kill shelter for 7 days, spent 13 days in a kennel at the vets after being neutered and becoming ill, went to a foster home that immediately took him back (fosters issue I am sure not dogs), now resting for a week at a pet resort until transport can be made to me on 5/3.

Here are my questions about this, as I want to as effectively as possible complete this as closely as possible as recommended.

1. What is the best way to effectively not have interactions with my dogs? They roam freely about the house. They are both pretty laid back and submissive but I know they are still going to be curious about this new dog.

2. When I have him out of his crate and on hand with me, should I have my other dogs outside? Or should I just drag him along and let my dogs go about their routine?

3. I work from home so I am home all day but sometimes really busy at work. Should I just leave him in his crate all day and then on lunch break take him out? Or would it be better to get him out a couple times through the day and bring him into my office with me? He wont be getting much attention while I am working but at least he would be here with me.

4. The cats, well if anyone has them you know they have a mind of their own and my soul purpose in their life is to feed, clean their litter box, and pet them when they want it. They also have free range of the home, Should I keep them locked up and away from him or let them do their normal routine?

These are just the things I want to be prepared with before he gets here, I will have 6,000 other questions once he arrives I am sure.
Diesel and Lace is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 04-25-2013, 11:19 PM   #2 (permalink)
Crowned Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 4,414
Default

As long as he s not freaking out at the others from the crate, you can let them wonder around and interact with each other through the crate first. Do you have someone to help with introductions? Taking them for a nice tiring walk together is a good thing.
RebelGSD is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-26-2013, 12:09 AM   #3 (permalink)
Crowned Member
 
shepherdmom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Rural Nevada
Posts: 4,401
Default

I know a lot of people here advocate the two week shut down. I am not one of them.

Please read this blog by an experienced trainer.

I just got a rescued dog what do I do? | stickydogblog
shepherdmom is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-26-2013, 12:20 AM   #4 (permalink)
Moderator
 
gsdsar's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: Maryland
Posts: 5,265
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by shepherdmom View Post
I know a lot of people here advocate the two week shut down. I am not one of them.

Please read this blog by an experienced trainer.

I just got a rescued dog what do I do? | stickydogblog
Great blog!!! Having brought countless rescue fosters into my family, the really sums it up.


Sent from Petguide.com Free App
__________________
"So that others may live"
gsdsar is online now   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-26-2013, 06:35 AM   #5 (permalink)
Crowned Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 4,414
Default

Some people chose to misinterpret the two-week shutdown as complete isolation. It is not. It allows the dog to observe the happenings in the home from the sidelines rather than as an active participant. It is simply about gradually integrating the new dog into a home and allowing it to de-stress.
Some dogs don't need it and do well immediately. Others don't handle it well, as the example of the OPs dog has shown. People who integrate dogs into homes on a regular basis ( as opposed to those who adopt a dog every couple of years ) support the two week gradual integration based on personal experience of fostering numerous dogs and integrating many dogs into their own home as well as picking up the pieces after integration has gone wrong. Better safe than sorry. Gradual integration will not hurt the dogs. Adopting a dog is a marathon and not a sprint. Adopters that have problems with their new dogs are usually those that disregard recommendations of previous caretakers thinking that they know it all better since they owned dogs before. Most failed adoptions are by people who consider crating to be cruel (in their mind dumping the dog when a problem arises is not cruel - a problem that 2-3 weeks of crating could easily solve.

Last edited by RebelGSD; 04-26-2013 at 06:43 AM.
RebelGSD is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-26-2013, 10:16 AM   #6 (permalink)
Senior Member
 
Diesel and Lace's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: SW PA
Posts: 485
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by shepherdmom View Post
I know a lot of people here advocate the two week shut down. I am not one of them.

Please read this blog by an experienced trainer.

I just got a rescued dog what do I do? | stickydogblog
Nice, this is kind of what I wanted to do but thought maybe it was in his best interest to do the two week shut down. This is similar but without the isolation. Great info! Thanks to everyone who continues to help me. I dont think there is a right or wrong way to do things each person and dog are different. I just want to do what is best for him!
Diesel and Lace is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-26-2013, 12:48 PM   #7 (permalink)
Crowned Member
 
shepherdmom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Rural Nevada
Posts: 4,401
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Diesel and Lace View Post
Nice, this is kind of what I wanted to do but thought maybe it was in his best interest to do the two week shut down. This is similar but without the isolation. Great info! Thanks to everyone who continues to help me. I dont think there is a right or wrong way to do things each person and dog are different. I just want to do what is best for him!
Thank you for rescuing him. Good luck and keep us updated on how it goes. I've found for us introducing them on a leash on a walk seems to work best for us.

We always have a crates set up so they can retreat if they wish but the doors are not closed. When we brought Tasha home she ignored the crate and watched her new world from under our dinning room table. After a while she choose to come join us in the living room.

and here is where she now lay's.



Yes that is my lap under 90# Buddy and 80# Tasha. LOL at least they keep me warm in the winter time.
shepherdmom is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-26-2013, 01:07 PM   #8 (permalink)
Knighted Member
 
wolfy dog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: USA
Posts: 3,004
Default

I would not let my dogs investigate the crated new comer. That can be threatening to him and make him crate aggressive which is not a good start.
Maybe have him in another room, door open, protected by a tall gate so they can see and smell each other while the new dog has room to retreat if need be.
I introduced a new foster to the most dominant dog in the group in a new area and once he approved the rest of the dogs just followed his cues. Then we all spend a good part of the day away from home to get them acquainted and more bonded. Once home it always worked out but the first few days I had the new one tethered to me.
Good luck and thanks for helping and sticking with this dog. Keep us updated, very interesting story.
wolfy dog is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-26-2013, 01:51 PM   #9 (permalink)
No Stinkin' Leashes Moderator
 
Cassidy's Mom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: SF Bay Area
Posts: 29,284
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by RebelGSD View Post
Some people chose to misinterpret the two-week shutdown as complete isolation. It is not. It allows the dog to observe the happenings in the home from the sidelines rather than as an active participant. It is simply about gradually integrating the new dog into a home and allowing it to de-stress.
Which seems to be exactly what that article advocates, although it suggests allowing "at least 3 weeks" for the dog to settle in.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Diesel and Lace View Post
Nice, this is kind of what I wanted to do but thought maybe it was in his best interest to do the two week shut down. This is similar but without the isolation.
Nope, no isolation in the 2 week shutdown: http://www.bigdogsbighearts.com/2_week_shutdown0001.pdf

It does say to "crate the dog in a room by itself if possible", but that doesn't mean the dog stays in the crate in that room by themselves all the time, it just means that when the dog is crated, it shouldn't be in a busy, active part of the house being bombarded with overwhelming stimuli. The link specifically mentions the dog seeing you and hearing you, and also leashing the dog to you or a piece of furniture near you, which wouldn't be possible if it were completely isolated in a crate in another room all the time.

The shut down means no:

Leash walks
Obedience training
Corrections
Car rides
Other dogs
Excessive petting or handling
Overwhelming the dog with too much new stuff

What it does allow for:

Exercise and ball play in your yard ("Do fun toss the ball games in your yard or on a lunge line if no fence. Remember to just have fun, let the dog run and explore.")

Gentle praise, touch, and soft petting (Dog is sitting nicely next to you, touch or softly pet the dog "good boy/girl" let then know you appreciate GOOD behavior. This makes naughty behavior not so fun if you ignore THAT but praise the good!")

I've never had a rescue so I've never needed to do the shut down, but it seems like basic common sense to me - you're bringing a dog into your home who has possibly had their entire world turned upside down, and they need some time, and a quiet place of their own, to help them settle in, feel comfortable, and learn to trust you. What could be wrong with that?

If you don't think it's necessary or would be beneficial for your dog, don't do it. But to take one small part of the program out of context and blow it all out of proportion, and then slam the entire program because of that misrepresentation, well that just doesn't make sense to me at all.
Cassidy's Mom is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 04-29-2013, 02:24 PM   #10 (permalink)
Senior Member
 
Diesel and Lace's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: SW PA
Posts: 485
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cassidy's Mom View Post
Which seems to be exactly what that article advocates, although it suggests allowing "at least 3 weeks" for the dog to settle in.



Nope, no isolation in the 2 week shutdown: http://www.bigdogsbighearts.com/2_week_shutdown0001.pdf

If you don't think it's necessary or would be beneficial for your dog, don't do it. But to take one small part of the program out of context and blow it all out of proportion, and then slam the entire program because of that misrepresentation, well that just doesn't make sense to me at all.
I am actually going to set up two crates for him. One in the living / dining room and one in our bedroom. (They are just too big to carry up and down the stairs between the rooms) That way if he is struggling in the living room around everyone he can be alone in the bedroom or visa versa. I want him to be close to us when we sleep so if he does ok with the one in the living / dining room then he will only use the one in our bedroom at night when its time to sleep. I am not slamming the program at all, I am looking to everyone who has experience with this. Both of my others are rescues but it has been 8 years since I did this and she was a puppy not an adult.
Diesel and Lace is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the German Shepherd Dog Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.


Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 08:03 PM.



Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
SEO by vBSEO 3.3.2
PetGuide.com
Basset Hound Forum Doberman Forum Golden Retriever Forum Beagle Forum
Boxer Forum Dog Forum Pit Bull Forum Poodle Forum
Bulldog Forum Fish Forum Havanese Forum Maltese Forum
Cat Forum German Shepherd Forum Labradoodle Forum Yorkie Forum Hedgehog Forum
Chihuahua Forum Retriever Breeds Cichlid Forum Dart Frog Forum Mice Breeder Forum