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-   -   My pup is starting to show his German side. (http://www.germanshepherds.com/forum/puppy-behavior/456418-my-pup-starting-show-his-german-side.html)

Diesel7602 06-02-2014 06:59 PM

My pup is starting to show his German side.
 
My boy never barked, only when he was in his cage. But now, if I'm taking him out to the bathroom and he sees some one, he lets out this deep bark and tries to pull towards them. Even if it was my husband, he won't stop tell he goes right up to them, realise who it is and is all bum wagging. I thought they can smell really well and would be able to tell with out having to alert or get to them? He doesn't act aggressive. Kinda like letting me know when someone is there. If I take him on walks he only barks at certain dogs, certain people. Maybe can sense thing I don't. My question is, what should I do? Let him bark it out and let him investigate, or let him worn me, and then teach him to stop and ignore?

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Longfisher 06-02-2014 07:11 PM

Fine Dog
 
Madame, you have a fine dog there. He's acting about as naturally as one could expect from a GSD.

Here's what I'd do:

1) Nothing to dissuade him from alerting at this point. No punishment at all. That's what you're seeing and that's also probably what you got him for.

2) As he grows older you'll see him alert with his ears and eyes and body language before he barks or growls. At that point, teach him to vocalize only on command.

It's easiest to teach him "Easy" with a gentle tap on the leash just to get his mind focused on you again instead of on someone else. He'll get the message quite quickly that he should await your command to vocalize.

3) When you ARE in a situation where there's danger and you want to the dog to not only alert but also vocalize develop a command to get him permission to do so.

4) Learn to predict the situation and the dog's response to it before it happens. Then give a command for the dog to do what you want him to do in that situation before he even knows he's in that situation. Don't let him do the thinking and deciding. You do it.

For instance, when I see someone walking alone or someone with a leashed dog who doesn't represent a threat to us, I tell command my dog "Easy". I also, generally, pull the dog aside and make him lay and stay. He gets the idea that I'm the one who determines danger.

But when we walk by a home with a dog-chewed fence where we've been almost attacked in the past I alert him to be on alert. Some won't agree with me, but I trained Zeus to respond to a low growl issuing from my throat when there's real danger or the low vocalization of the consonants "Sq" for prey (it's work for more than just "Sq"irrels).

He's instantly on alert. No one knows I gave him a command. He learns when he should alert and when not. And, he always looks to me first to give him a heads up on how he should react.

He's become a deterrent with a capital D.

Don't dissuade the dog from alerting. Just teach him to accept direction.

It took us a year and a half. But Zeus never growls or barks without command now.

LF

Diesel7602 06-02-2014 07:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Longfisher (Post 5593698)
Madame, you have a fine dog there. He's acting about as naturally as one could expect from a GSD.

Here's what I'd do:

1) Nothing to dissuade him from alerting at this point. No punishment at all. That's what you're seeing and that's also probably what you got him for.

2) As he grows older you'll see him alert with his ears and eyes and body language before he barks or growls. At that point, teach him to vocalize only on command.

It's easiest to teach him "Easy" with a gentle tap on the leash just to get his mind focused on you again instead of on someone else. He'll get the message quite quickly that he should await your command to vocalize.

3) When you ARE in a situation where there's danger and you want to the dog to not only alert but also vocalize develop a command to get him permission to do so.

4) Learn to predict the situation and the dog's response to it before it happens. Then give a command for the dog to do what you want him to do in that situation before he even knows he's in that situation. Don't let him do the thinking and deciding. You do it.

For instance, when I see someone walking alone or someone with a leashed dog who doesn't represent a threat to us, I tell command my dog "Easy". I also, generally, pull the dog aside and make him lay and stay. He gets the idea that I'm the one who determines danger.

But when we walk by a home with a dog-chewed fence where we've been almost attacked in the past I alert him to be on alert. Some won't agree with me, but I trained Zeus to respond to a low growl issuing from my throat when there's real danger or the low vocalization of the consonants "Sq" for prey (it's work for more than just "Sq"irrels).

He's instantly on alert. No one knows I gave him a command. He learns when he should alert and when not. And, he always looks to me first to give him a heads up on how he should react.

He's become a deterrent with a capital D.

Don't dissuade the dog from alerting. Just teach him to accept direction.

It took us a year and a half. But Zeus never growls or barks without command now.

LF

Thank you. That is what I was looking for. He is 17 weeks now, so I think this is a normal mile stone. =) oh and teething too. I love his new bark, he will stand between me and what ever he is barking at, look at me and bark at its again.

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shemeld135 06-03-2014 02:55 PM

my pups around the same age and doing the SAME thing! He's acting like the big boy he will be soon haha

Maxil 06-03-2014 03:14 PM

I was sitting in the garden with my father and uncle , and suddenly my 7weeks old puppy barked on my uncle when he tapped on the table , it was really funny but wired though.
I love it when I know my puppy is growing up to be a strong dog that can defend me and my family

Diesel7602 06-05-2014 11:43 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by shemeld135 (Post 5596722)
my pups around the same age and doing the SAME thing! He's acting like the big boy he will be soon haha

What's your pups birthday? Perseus is 2/2/14

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Ellimaybel 06-05-2014 12:17 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Longfisher (Post 5593698)
the low vocalization of the consonants "Sq" for prey (it's work for more than just "Sq"irrels).
LF

My non GSD loves chasing squirrels and he is the same way now. All I have to do is exactly that and he is on super alert. When he goes on alert, Gunther does too so it has worked out. While sitting here I just tested it and whispered it softly. The other dog is outside but Gunther immediately looked up and around for anything off. Never even realized it was a training tool until you pointed it out.

DJEtzel 06-05-2014 12:49 PM

OP, this is a natural fearful/reactive response in puppies. I would look into LOOK AT THAT training- you want to minimize this because these people are not threats. You don't want to let him approach when he's barking because you're just reinforcing him for doing it.

Marking and rewarding him for looking at passersby, etc. before he barks is your best bet. That would be the look at that training I mentioned.

Diesel7602 06-05-2014 01:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DJEtzel (Post 5605522)
OP, this is a natural fearful/reactive response in puppies. I would look into LOOK AT THAT training- you want to minimize this because these people are not threats. You don't want to let him approach when he's barking because you're just reinforcing him for doing it.

Marking and rewarding him for looking at passersby, etc. before he barks is your best bet. That would be the look at that training I mentioned.



I'm not sure if I love you or hate you sometimes.

Thank you for that.

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Lilie 06-05-2014 01:32 PM

You have a four month old BABY. It isn't alerting in the sense that it wants to protect you. It's alerting in the sense that it isn't sure how it's supposed to handle that specific situation.

If you continue to reward that behavior, you will create your very own fear aggressive dog.


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