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Jim_Gk 05-20-2014 12:00 PM

Help me please
 
1 Attachment(s)
Hello

I have recently adopted a GSD.She is 6 months old and she is great :D
The problem is that she is afraid of almost everything.

She was living in a remote place in some yard.. her owner didnt visit her every day and she isnt used of people or cars etc.

What can i do? i dont want for my Lea to be afraid of everything!
Since i have adopted her she has shown development!

3 questions (4 with the above)
1. Will she be socialized??
2. How can i achieve to bond with her (engagement)?
3. Her ears are down ( i think because of toothing.. i am giving her vitamins) will they rise up?
Attachment 210961

Kahrg4 05-20-2014 12:06 PM

Go slow.

1. She will only be socialized if you do it. I would start with just a few people you know coming into the home and having them pretty much ignore her. If she's as skittish as you say, you need to establish first that something isn't a threat to her before you can turn it into a friend.
2. The more you spend time around her, feed her, interact with her the more she will bond with you. It takes time, especially when overcoming maltreatment by a previous owner. Can I ask how long you've had her?
3. I'm no ear expert. I think most pups have at least one ear up by 6 months. You could always try taping. There are many threads on here about how to get ears up. Take a look at some of those.

Wild Wolf 05-20-2014 12:15 PM

Yes, she can be socialized, but her base genetic temperament will be what it is despite socialization (which absolutely does help, especially prior to a year of age). Make sure socialization is always positive, avoid negative situations, don't make a big deal over anything (especially if she is fearful) and expose her safely to the things that frighten her. It may even be worth it to find a professional behaviorist or trainer local to you that can teach you proper socialization techniques, how to respond to her fear/worry, etc.

Feeding her, playing with her, training her and creating balance and routine with her will all help you build a bond - these things happen over time, so don't stress too much.

To be it looks like her ears are going to stay down, but I don't know for sure and nobody can say for sure. The two GSDs I have owned ears went up very early and stayed up. You could try taping and providing bones and whatnot to chew on to strengthen the muscles of the jaw/head.

She is beautiful, would love to see more photos of her!

huntergreen 05-20-2014 12:50 PM

imho, the best thing you can do for both of you is start training with a pro trainer. will help solve the problems and help/strengthen the bond between you and your pup.

Crimes 05-20-2014 01:44 PM

Working with a trainer sounds like it would be a good idea, but there are some steps you can take by yourself as well.

Getting down to her level and talking to her in calm soothing tones should help. Keep some treats and toys ready to reward her every time she comes up to you on her own.
ANY kind of training, even basic obedience commands will strengthen the bond you two will share.

Once she feels comfortable with you, take her to a local dog park, or a store like Petsmart or Tractor Supply on a regular basis. Bring a bag of training treats with you and encourage her to approach someone who is interested in interacting with her. She should learn that other humans are not threatening, this is what has worked for me and Apollo, however sometimes he will relapse and become Mr. Mouth again, in which case I just make it a point to get him out more again.

Magwart 05-20-2014 02:51 PM

I've seen many, many rescued dogs this age make incredible transformations....but it takes time. Some recover better than others. All of them I've known have ended up bonding very, very deeply with their people.

Make every single interaction with her about building her trust in you and her self-confidence. Praise every act of bravery, no matter how small. With one of my worst cases, the day the dog tentatively pulled at a dishrag while I was drying dishes was huge -- he was trying to tug. What would be an obnoxious behavior in a normal pup was incredible progress for this one. Celebrate those moments of progress with the dog!

I agree re training. I've seen training radically transform dogs like this about week 3 or 4 into a novice course, when all of the sudden they realize they know the right thing to do, and the world is predictable. In one of mine, there was a magical moment when his face lit up, the posture of the dog changed and the head came up, the ears that had been flat popped up, the stance squared and the noble dog inside him came out to meet me for the first time. It was glorious--and life-changing for this dog.

I'd add this though: interview trainers to make sure you choose someone who understands that rehabilitation is the real goal, and skills are just a means to that end. For a dog like this, the training method has to be very, very positive. If the trainer is used to using prong collars or other heavy corrections, he or she needs to be capable of ditching those and adjusting techniques to suit this dog--good ones can do that, but the skill set is very different than training a "hard" dog. Clicker training would be fabulous for a dog like this.

Be very careful also about doing too much, too fast in terms of socialization. Your job is to know where her "shut down" line is. Never take her past that line. The line will move farther and farther out, but if you try to take her everywhere and do everything too quickly, it will be counter-productive. Baby steps. If she can walk down the driveway, awesome. Next week she might walk down one or two houses and then return. Maybe in a month you can go a whole block. Etc.

Susan_GSD_mom 05-20-2014 03:47 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Crimes (Post 5542025)

Once she feels comfortable with you, take her to a local dog park, or a store like Petsmart or Tractor Supply

I vote a huge NO to dog parks. You will want her to have a lot more confidence before you take her there, if ever! BAD things happen too fast at dog parks, and you don't want ANYTHING negative to happen to her right now!!!

I think the majority of GSD owners on this forum will agree with me on this point.

Susan

Chip18 05-20-2014 03:50 PM

Post 8: has some useful links and info on "Why Dog Parks are a Bad idea" :)
http://www.germanshepherds.com/forum...allenging.html

Mishka&Milo 05-20-2014 03:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Susan_GSD_mom (Post 5542681)
I vote a huge NO to dog parks. You will want her to have a lot more confidence before you take her there, if ever! BAD things happen too fast at dog parks, and you don't want ANYTHING negative to happen to her right now!!!



I think the majority of GSD owners on this forum will agree with me on this point.



Susan

I agree with this. Do you have any family with friendly dogs? Or friends? That would be a good way to start.



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Mary Jane 05-20-2014 04:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Magwart (Post 5542465)
..... Your job is to know where her "shut down" line is. Never take her past that line. ....

Seconding Magwart's post, you throw away the calendar and your own expectations and let your dog set the pace. You will quickly learn how she expresses a tiny bit of stress and then stop whatever is causing the stress.

"Quit while you're ahead" Really, really. You want any interaction to end on a positive note. So please put your schedule aside and listen to your dog. She will tell you and in that conversation you'll build your bond.


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