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-   -   Anyone heard of "fisking"? (http://www.germanshepherds.com/forum/puppy-behavior/435857-anyone-heard-fisking.html)

LinnMurr 04-09-2014 05:01 PM

Anyone heard of "fisking"?
 
I was told by my daycare that my 9-month-old unaltered male GSD(working lines DDR/West German) is nibbling large chunks of hair from his playmates. It is not painful and his playmates let him nibble- Their owners are not too happy.
Our trainer asked a few vets on site, who call it "fisking" and they say it's due to anxiety. I have searched the internet and found nothing dog-related for "fisking".
Kato has over-stayed his welcome at daycare as an unaltered male because the staff loves him, but this behavior was the "tipping point" and he can't return until the problem is controlled. The fact that he's lasted this long is a testament to how sweet he is and how much the staff adores him. He probably should have left daycare a month ago.
The part that I don't understand is the "anxiety" thing - he's extremely calm, confident, and still puppyish. My layperson opinion is that this behavior is more sexual than anxiety-related, and may improve after he's altered.
Please let me know your thoughts - Thank you. :confused:

onyx'girl 04-09-2014 05:17 PM

I've always called it flea-biting(frontal incisors nibbling) and it is a sign of affection,play. I don't ever see my dogs doing it as a sign of anxiety. My border/goldenx use to do it to people she was fond of.

LinnMurr 04-09-2014 05:30 PM

Thank you for the quick reply Onyx- That makes sense to me as well. He does it to the dogs he prefers to be with.

ApselBear 04-09-2014 05:57 PM

Apsel does this to me when I scratch just the right spot. Maybe he's trying to return the favor for me, but I've been working to break him of this as he did accidentally pinch a little too hard once. I haven't seen him do it to our heelers, but wouldn't be surprised if he does. I see no anxiety in my dog either.

Mikelia 04-09-2014 06:47 PM

I've always called it neetering because they neeter neeter neeter lol. I also believe it is a sign of affection and a happy mood. Eli does it to the cats all the time. My gsd growing up would do it on command if she was excited. My dogs have always stopped when I asked them to, it's not a bad behaviour and they are happy to usually lick whatever they are neetering instead.

David Taggart 04-09-2014 06:54 PM

In humans, acknowledge, picking at each other skin like apes is a rite of passage only the most intimate couples partake in. Though, there is a psychological problem ( not yours as an owner, it doesn't concern other dogs directly and definitely not their owners, and has nothing to do with anxiety), it concerns your dog inner self only, because connected to the sense of imperfection of own self, and, in human, often associated with a perculiar subject which is called "Girl Code" or "Guy Code" Urban Dictionary: Girl Code.

I suggest you to change his environment, it also could be a good idea to make time-out for him before you put him into another daycare centre. He needs attention from his kind, and simple walks in public places mayprovide that confidence.

mydogs 04-09-2014 10:34 PM

Using his flea teeth:) he's showing affection


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GatorBytes 04-09-2014 11:01 PM

My guy does this to unshaven men's chins...he'll start with kisses and then nibbles and kisses again (if he likes them)...no anxiety at all...

If he doesn't trust, then he would take a lick or two and then bark in their face and back up (he would then be told to go lie down - dog that is:))

Susan_GSD_mom 04-09-2014 11:03 PM

We always called those little bites "groomy bites", and even horses do them, including newborn foals. They're meant to be friendly, not mean, but they certainly can pinch and hurt. I never corrected my dogs, though, because it is a sign of affection. Watch horses at pasture, and you will see them grooming mutually, usually on the withers and neck.

onyx'girl 04-09-2014 11:07 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Susan_GSD_mom (Post 5352433)
We always called those little bites "groomy bites", and even horses do them, including newborn foals. They're meant to be friendly, not mean, but they certainly can pinch and hurt. I never corrected my dogs, though, because it is a sign of affection. Watch horses at pasture, and you will see them grooming mutually, usually on the withers and neck.

I saw two horses doing that last weekend at Starry Skies Equine Rescue and Sanctuary
I wanted to take photo's of them, it was so sweet!


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