Beginning stages of resource guarding? - German Shepherd Dog Forums

Increase font size: 0, 10, 25, 50%

GermanShepherds.com is the premier German Shepherd Forum on the internet. Registered Users do not see the above ads.
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 02-23-2012, 10:48 PM   #1 (permalink)
Kev
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Toronto
Posts: 305
Default Beginning stages of resource guarding?

Hi guys, my pup of 10 weeks old is starting to show what I believe is the beginning stages of resource guarding.. He has a chew toy that he likes best and whenever I give it to him, he'll go somewhere else from me and chew it away. However, when I get close to him with the toy he moves to another spot with the toy away from me and ignores me when I call him. Right now I took the toy away from him and if I do give him a toy, I make him sit first and then toss it to him.
I seriously need advise on how to handle this before it turns to growling and snapping.
P.S- He will follow me if I turn around and walk the other way.
Kev is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 02-23-2012, 10:53 PM   #2 (permalink)
Crowned Member
 
Emoore's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: North DFW, TX
Posts: 9,567
Default

Is there something he likes better than the chew toy? Like a little cooked chicken or hot dog?

A lot of us play the "trade up" game or teach "drop it." When the dog has an item, you hold a higher value item (like some chicken or hot dog) in a closed fist in front of their nose. When they drop the item to get the meat, you reward with the chicken or hotdog or cheese or whatever. Soon he'll start dropping it reliably when you hold the closed fist in front of his nose. When he's doing it reliably, you go ahead and add the "drop it" command. 90% of the time, you'll want to take the chewy bone away from him for a second or two and then give it back. He needs to learn he can trust you to not arbitrarily take away things he likes and he needs to learn that good things happen when you're around.
__________________
Rocky vom Backyard- 12 years young
Kopper vom Felssclucht Bach - 3 years

At the Bridge:
Cash van der Animal Shelter 2006-2010
Emoore is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-23-2012, 10:56 PM   #3 (permalink)
Crowned Member
 
llombardo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Illinois
Posts: 7,708
Default

You can just take it away from him, let him think about it, and then give it back and talk to him through the process...he just needs to know that he's getting it back and he probably will learn to understand that once you do it a couple times.
__________________
Misty- Samoyed Mix
Tannor- Golden Retriever CGC
Robyn- German Shepherd CGC, TC
Midnite-German Shepherd CGC, TC
Brennan- Golden Retriever CGC
Batman- Husky/Greyhound
llombardo is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-23-2012, 11:03 PM   #4 (permalink)
Elite Member
 
BlackthornGSD's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Central Virginia
Posts: 1,436
Default

Or you could make it into a game where you teach him to bring it back for more fun...
__________________
Christine
Blackthorn Working German Shepherds


BlackthornGSD is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-23-2012, 11:04 PM   #5 (permalink)
The Agility Rocks! Moderator
 
MaggieRoseLee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: Bushkill, PA (The Poconos!)
Posts: 26,261
Default

I would NOT make this a big power play issue with a 10 week old puppy.

The best option, and easiest option is to have something else your puppy will want and do a trade. Then a trade back. So your puppy learns that it's never a big deal when a human takes something but they either get something of equal or greater value. And usually end up with the original item back too.

When we have our young puppies it's best to manage everything with our brains and in a positive manner.

Make everything positive, happy and fun with you a confident and consistant leader and you won't ever have any growling and snapping issues. How fun is THAT! NOT!

PUPPIES are much different than adult dogs, so we have to manage and train much differently. A growl and a snap from a young puppy is like from a 2 year old human child. They don't know what the heck they are doing! So we may not like it, but it's an easy fix to teach them what we do want. In a positive way to guide and show what we want rather than being worried about PUNISHING for what we do not.

Teach what you want, show what you want, guide your puppy with what you want. And they will do what you want without corrections but because they want too!

You able to really watch and listen to all Michael Ellis's 'engagement' training? EXTREMELY valuable information for all of us. Engagement - Key to Training

__________________
*****
MACH3 Bretta Lee Wildhaus MXG MJG MXF MFB TQX HIT CGC TC
Glory B Wildhaus AX, AXJ, XF
plus Miss Osin Blue Wildhaus

"How is it one careless match can start a forest fire, but it takes a whole box to start a campfire?." ANONYMOUS
MaggieRoseLee is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-23-2012, 11:10 PM   #6 (permalink)
Crowned Member
 
Emoore's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: North DFW, TX
Posts: 9,567
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by llombardo View Post
You can just take it away from him, let him think about it, and then give it back and talk to him through the process...he just needs to know that he's getting it back and he probably will learn to understand that once you do it a couple times.
The only problem I have with this is that it quickly can turn into the "you can't catch me" game, where the dog realizes that you're coming to take his bone and he doesn't really want you to have it so he runs away and being chased is so much fun that he learns to run from you for fun.

I prefer to turn it into a game where the dog comes to you on command and turns it over willingly to get a better reward or more fun game. The dog very quickly learns to surrender what he has. It's not like you spend the next 14 years trading up for something higher-value than what he has in his mouth.
__________________
Rocky vom Backyard- 12 years young
Kopper vom Felssclucht Bach - 3 years

At the Bridge:
Cash van der Animal Shelter 2006-2010
Emoore is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-23-2012, 11:25 PM   #7 (permalink)
Senior Member
 
Clyde's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Calgary, Alberta
Posts: 457
Default

Yes you are right those are signs of resource guarding. If he will follow you when you turn and walk away encourage this by offering a treat once he starts to follow you. You can just drop them you don't even have to make a big deal out of it. Not even to trade just give the treat then let him chew his chew then again walk away and when he follows repeat the treats a few times. When I bring a dog into my house I often give them treats for laying quietly chewing on bones, toys and chews. When I do trade at first I like to trade with a better item not something less. Say identical chews but the one you are giving has PB or cream cheese on it. I have seen people screw up trading by only using a quick treat then pretty soon the dog catches on and they are back at square one. I really like the walking away thing because it sends the message to the puppy that you have no interest in what he has.

I like to give the dog things that I do not have to take away at the end because I know lots of people have made there dogs a bit guardy by always giving bullies or bones that they feel they must take the last bit away before it is swallowed. I like to give my dogs things that are safe if they consume it this way they are not always thinking it will be taken away.

I treat all my dogs the same and all of them will readily leave a bowl of food or meaty bone for me because they have no concern that I actually want it.
Clyde is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-23-2012, 11:28 PM   #8 (permalink)
Crowned Member
 
cliffson1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 4,278
Default

Why do you think it will turn into growling and snapping??
cliffson1 is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-23-2012, 11:39 PM   #9 (permalink)
Knighted Member
 
Jack's Dad's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: California
Posts: 2,143
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by cliffson1 View Post
Why do you think it will turn into growling and snapping??
You just had to ask didn't you?
Jack's Dad is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Old 02-24-2012, 10:41 AM   #10 (permalink)
Crowned Member
 
llombardo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Illinois
Posts: 7,708
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Emoore View Post
The only problem I have with this is that it quickly can turn into the "you can't catch me" game, where the dog realizes that you're coming to take his bone and he doesn't really want you to have it so he runs away and being chased is so much fun that he learns to run from you for fun.

I prefer to turn it into a game where the dog comes to you on command and turns it over willingly to get a better reward or more fun game. The dog very quickly learns to surrender what he has. It's not like you spend the next 14 years trading up for something higher-value than what he has in his mouth.
I have done it this way with every dog that has come into my home and I never had a dog run and it becomes a game of chase. You don't approach them like its a game...the person is in control. The same goes for the food, while they are eating, hands are in the bowl with no growling...its just not acceptable. All my dogs eat with each other and play with toys together. My young nieces can go up to any of my dogs and take their toys, bones, or food without a peep.
__________________
Misty- Samoyed Mix
Tannor- Golden Retriever CGC
Robyn- German Shepherd CGC, TC
Midnite-German Shepherd CGC, TC
Brennan- Golden Retriever CGC
Batman- Husky/Greyhound
llombardo is offline   Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the German Shepherd Dog Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
If you do not want to register, fill this field only and the name will be used as user name for your post.
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 10:48 PM.



Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
SEO by vBSEO 3.3.2
PetGuide.com
Basset.net DobermanTalk.com GoldenRetrieverForum.com OurBeagleWorld.com
BoxerForums.com DogForums.com GoPitbull.com PoodleForum.com
BulldogBreeds.com FishForums.com HavaneseForum.com SpoiledMaltese.com
CatForum.com GermanShepherds.com Labradoodle-dogs.net YorkieForum.com
Chihuahua-People.com RetrieverBreeds.com