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post #1 of 12 (permalink) Old 05-11-2016, 11:10 PM Thread Starter
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Newbie Raw questions

I read that you should feed your dog bones? Maybe a dumb question but how do you feed your dog bones? I was advised to not give any bones because they can splinter and hurt the stomach? And can I substitute bones for goats milk? I actually give goat milk right now mixed with the kibble. I notice she poops less since the goats milk inclusion a few days ago.
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post #2 of 12 (permalink) Old 05-11-2016, 11:42 PM
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Bones are safe for dogs as long as the are fed RAW and never cooked. It is the cooking processes that makes bones brittle and splinter into sharp pieces. However dogs can't eat large heavy weight bearing bones of large animals (ie: beef leg leg bones)

For feeding purposes bones that are fed are usually turkey necks, duck necks, poultry frames (the carcass), chicken legs, chicken/duck feet, goat ribs, lamb ribs and necks etc. Some larger bones such as knuckle bones, beef ribs, larger beef neck bones are considered recreational bones. Bones that are chewed on the keep teeth clean and for chewing pleasure but aren't actually chewed and eaten as part of the meal.

Goats milk is a good source of calcium but more for it's probiotic properties. Bone contains both calcium and phosphorous and the two are not interchangeable as for as I know.

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post #3 of 12 (permalink) Old 05-11-2016, 11:45 PM
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Raw bones don't splinter. Only cooked ones do.

Raw bones are not without risk. Then again that can be said about most things in life. Best do your research or use a commercial raw. Be sure to watch the calcium phosphorus ratios in commercial raw - many are not appropriate for large breed puppies. No more than 4.5 grams of calcium per 1000kcals (ideal closer to 3 g) and a calc/phos ratio between 1.1:1 and 1.5:1

Raw goats milk will not provide enough calcium. If you chose not to feed whole bones or a bone containing grind - you would need to provide alternate sources of calcium like bone meal, eggshell or a commercial calcium supplement.

Raw can be overwhelming first but after seeing the results for the past 16 years - it's all been worth it ^_^
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post #4 of 12 (permalink) Old 05-11-2016, 11:54 PM
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Remember to be mindful of the link between that too much calcium in puppyhood and hip dysplasia in breeds susceptible to hip dyspalsia which GSD's are.
GSD need to grow slow and steady. Calcium and phosphorous also need to be kept in proper proportion as well.

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post #5 of 12 (permalink) Old 05-12-2016, 12:07 AM
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Good information here:

Easy Home-Prepared Dog Food | Whole Dog Journal

Ziva 03.07.2013
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post #6 of 12 (permalink) Old 05-12-2016, 12:52 AM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by voodoolamb View Post
Raw bones don't splinter. Only cooked ones do.

Raw bones are not without risk. Then again that can be said about most things in life. Best do your research or use a commercial raw. Be sure to watch the calcium phosphorus ratios in commercial raw - many are not appropriate for large breed puppies. No more than 4.5 grams of calcium per 1000kcals (ideal closer to 3 g) and a calc/phos ratio between 1.1:1 and 1.5:1

Raw goats milk will not provide enough calcium. If you chose not to feed whole bones or a bone containing grind - you would need to provide alternate sources of calcium like bone meal, eggshell or a commercial calcium supplement.

Raw can be overwhelming first but after seeing the results for the past 16 years - it's all been worth it ^_^
Ugh, does sound overwhelming lol. I can't help but think that owners have been throwing raw scraps to their dogs for hundreds if not thousands of years and they were fine and dandy. I have no problem in spending a bit more for better food, its just the calculation part that bugs me. How do I measure the amount of calcium and phosphorous in a chicken neck?
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post #7 of 12 (permalink) Old 05-12-2016, 12:56 AM Thread Starter
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That is good information, but doesnt give the exact calculations. Right now I feed her 1 cup of royal canin 3x a day. About 2 tablespoons of low fat yogurt, and a bunch of treats (training purposes). I have been cutting back on the treats and rationing out her meals and using that for training. I kind of have a feeling that she's getting too much dairy. Her next vet visit is this weekend and I am very curious to see her weight. She seems as though she's grown alot over the past 3 weeks.
Oh and I give her baked liver about every other day.
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post #8 of 12 (permalink) Old 05-12-2016, 01:07 AM Thread Starter
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Ok guys, I found a step by step guide;
Raw dog food | Raw diet | Raw dog food recipes | Feeding Raw
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post #9 of 12 (permalink) Old 05-12-2016, 01:16 AM
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I did a consult with a well respected holistic vet in my area, whose backbone of her practice is home cooked and home prepared raw diets. She gave me a handy list of weights and recipes to follow during the most critical growth stages. I also used a few commercial products that had known quantities during that time. I've seen too many horror stories of raw or home prepared gone badly.

There are a lot of good products out there - premixes, Vitamin and mineral mixes, that you just add fresh meat to and it becomes a balanced diet. No guess work. Honest kitchen, balance it, oasis canine, sojos etc.

royal canin is a pretty low quality food. I'm betting you would get the results you want just by switching to a better kibble. You could always add healthy toppers, offer raw recreational bones, and what not too.
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post #10 of 12 (permalink) Old 05-12-2016, 11:18 AM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by voodoolamb View Post
I did a consult with a well respected holistic vet in my area, whose backbone of her practice is home cooked and home prepared raw diets. She gave me a handy list of weights and recipes to follow during the most critical growth stages. I also used a few commercial products that had known quantities during that time. I've seen too many horror stories of raw or home prepared gone badly.

There are a lot of good products out there - premixes, Vitamin and mineral mixes, that you just add fresh meat to and it becomes a balanced diet. No guess work. Honest kitchen, balance it, oasis canine, sojos etc.

royal canin is a pretty low quality food. I'm betting you would get the results you want just by switching to a better kibble. You could always add healthy toppers, offer raw recreational bones, and what not too.
Wow, really? It was $70 for the 30lb bag. And made specifically for GSD. I thought it was good quality. Do you by any chance have that guide your holistic vet gave? I mentioned going raw to my vet and she advised against it. She said any store-bought good quality food is fine. I'm guessing vets are like human doctors; they want to push their meds and product because thats how they make a living.
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