raising your own raw food! - Page 2 - German Shepherd Dog Forums
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post #11 of 21 (permalink) Old 04-03-2016, 03:16 AM Thread Starter
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You know, I could almost be a vegetarian, too. I eat mostly chicken. I love most animals, and when I think about it too too much, it bothers me that we kill animals to eat. But, then again, the Bible tells us that God gave man dominion over the creatures on the Earth. And we are omnivores, aren't we? What a dilemma (sp?)!
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post #12 of 21 (permalink) Old 04-03-2016, 04:17 PM
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I raise coturnix quail for dog food. I like quail as opposed to chicken because they require less space, make less noise, and convert feed to muscle mass far better then chickens. Way easier to slaughter and process then chickens. Plus they aren't considered "livestock" so I can have them here in suburbia

I'm planning to do an aquaponics system with tilapia. I hate fish myself so that will be dog food too.

If I had the room I'd do buns as well.

Lots of ways to make it more cost effective. My birds primarily eat red worms and meal worms. I have thriving colonies of both that survive on the food scraps, coffee grounds, and eggshells that would normally be tossed. As far as the rest of their feed - I ferment the game bird feed to make the nutrients more available, i grow my own fodder and sprout the seeds. Use feed saving designs for their feeders.

All and all it costs around a buck per pound of organic, humanely raised and slaughtered dog food. More expensive then the chicken I can get at walmart but way more affordable then similarly raised meats at whole foods.
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post #13 of 21 (permalink) Old 04-03-2016, 04:33 PM
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We used to raise goats and chickens. We did slaughter chickens for our own food but never got up to the volume it would have taken to feed the dogs, although that was my plan & dream. I don't feed raw for the very reason that factor farmed, mass slaughtered meat is SO dirty and unhealthy. (Fecal soup, anyone?)

Having seen the difference in my chickens, who were free range on ten acres, the difference in their health, their eggs, the meat ect ect. Vs images from these huge chicken barns where they clean the barn ONCE, after each meat bird flock goes to slaughter. I know what my coop smelled like when it needed a muckingk which we did a minimum of once per week and they were only in there at night! I am digressing. Factory farms gross me right out, I have seen testing showing the difference in salmonella levels of pastured organic chicken vs factory chicken.

It is my dream one day to raise meat for my dogs. We have 40 acres now. Someday. Someday.

I didn't find the butchering the chickens nearly as bad as I thought it would be, we had a good method. We never killdd any goats. Not sure I could do that, though all those bucklings would make for some fine meat
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post #14 of 21 (permalink) Old 04-03-2016, 04:36 PM
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When we had the farm, the dogs did get all the parts we didn't want : necks, organs, ect

My snobby girl wouldn't touch it but my old man Ruger was never happier. We'd be out there doing open air processing and just toss that stuff to the dogs. Some I'd save and freeze because it was too much to give him at one sitting
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post #15 of 21 (permalink) Old 12-13-2016, 10:52 PM
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Hmmm, I have a male and a female rabbit to produce raw rabbits as my dog's snacks, but they are not her main food. The cost is very low since there are only just 2 adult rabbits, several 4month olds, and several 2 months old to feed at worst at any given time and it also takes negligible time. If there are no time/spacing/ethic constraints I can't imagine why not.
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post #16 of 21 (permalink) Old 12-14-2016, 10:54 AM
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If anyone cares to log/chronicle their journey raising raw for their dogs (rabbit, quail, chicken, or otherwise) I'd be interested in following along.

There's a closed Facebook group called "Fodder for Rabbits" that has a ton of info. The admins are sorta slow to approve new members and there isn't a ton of traffic. BUT, for anyone interested in conversion rates, meeting nutrition requirements, avoiding mold, etc. that group is solid gold. I started sprouting more wheat grass + bean sprouts for my chickens, and their egg production went up nearly 30%, IN WINTER. Fodder rocks.

“There are some who can live without wild things, and some who cannot.” - Aldo Leopold


Tica 3.11.2009 |~| Ayla 5.29.2015
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post #17 of 21 (permalink) Old 12-14-2016, 11:34 AM
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I am always interested in this, but I could never actually have an animal I raised killed. I do have a nice chicken coop, so would totally be up for raising chickens for their eggs and then just letting them live out their lives in peace. I love goats, but raising them for milk would mean a kid a year, and if he's a male, then... yeah. Life on a farm is rough.

My neighbor might raise pigs next year, and if so I might have him do all the work and then buy a whole hog off him. That way I never have to get to know the animal.
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post #18 of 21 (permalink) Old 12-14-2016, 11:55 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Muskeg View Post
I am always interested in this, but I could never actually have an animal I raised killed. I do have a nice chicken coop, so would totally be up for raising chickens for their eggs and then just letting them live out their lives in peace. I love goats, but raising them for milk would mean a kid a year, and if he's a male, then... yeah. Life on a farm is rough.

My neighbor might raise pigs next year, and if so I might have him do all the work and then buy a whole hog off him. That way I never have to get to know the animal.
I really like my old ladies.... ours live to a grand old age. The elderly gals only lay one or two eggs each week, but that's okay. I think eggs are pretty much the perfect food, for humans and dogs alike. If I could only own one non-canine species for the rest of my life, it would be chickens.

“There are some who can live without wild things, and some who cannot.” - Aldo Leopold


Tica 3.11.2009 |~| Ayla 5.29.2015

Last edited by WIBackpacker; 12-14-2016 at 11:59 AM.
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post #19 of 21 (permalink) Old 12-14-2016, 12:00 PM
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Do you have suggestions on breed of chicken for egg-layers? We used to keep Rhode Island Reds and a few bantams, but I know some are more cold-hardy and friendly/quiet than others. Our reds were loud, friendly but loud. Was thinking maybe Buff Orpingtons or New Hampshire Reds. We have long, snowy winters.
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post #20 of 21 (permalink) Old 12-14-2016, 12:16 PM
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Originally Posted by Muskeg View Post
Do you have suggestions on breed of chicken for egg-layers? We used to keep Rhode Island Reds and a few bantams, but I know some are more cold-hardy and friendly/quiet than others. Our reds were loud, friendly but loud. Was thinking maybe Buff Orpingtons or New Hampshire Reds. We have long, snowy winters.
I would see if you can get ahold of some Brahmas (light, dark or buff). Big, solid, well-feathered, including feathery "boots". All of mine, including multiple generations of roos, were calm. They make low chortling noises more than screeching, I joked that mine always said "Oh noooooo, oh nooooo!" when I walked in the run, it's a distinct noise and kinda funny. The Brahmas acted immune to the cold and would stomp around in the snow when all the rest of the breeds stayed inside the coop. Egg production isn't as high as Rhode Island reds, but it's steady through the entire year (unless they're molting).

Pic of two of my Brahma hens, you can see how feathery they are, pic taken early fall ~

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“There are some who can live without wild things, and some who cannot.” - Aldo Leopold


Tica 3.11.2009 |~| Ayla 5.29.2015

Last edited by WIBackpacker; 12-14-2016 at 12:22 PM. Reason: Added picture
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