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Topic Review (Newest First)
01-23-2015 08:22 PM
levous Wow. Thank you. That really was all new to me and makes perfect sense. Stomping my feet and showing my authority is not new but in the heat of it all you kind of forget that part. Besides that, stomping on wet leaves might not have the intended effect

I will never reach for a collar again. As you said, you only make that mistake once.

I appreciate the help. I will leash my dogs whenever this dog is around but, should they surprise me, I'll be much better prepared.

thanks again




Quote:
Originally Posted by selzer View Post
There are ways to break up fights. Usually you can avoid them by being aware and managing the distance between the dogs, controlling your own dog, etc. I know that might not sound fair, but the facts are that you can only adjust your own behavior and no one else's. So, if you want to keep your dog save, keep your radar on, and when you see Idiot Owner with Aggressive Dog, get your dogs under control, and safely away from the other dog.

Also, don't engage in activities that are likely to create problems with unknown dogs, like throwing toys or giving out treats in a crowd. I know a lot of people like to walk multiple dogs. Personally, I think it is best to be responsible for one dog at a time in public. It definitely keeps your dogs safer.

But that is all prevention and not breaking up a fight in progress. It is the optimum thing to do, of course, but sometimes there is a fight, and it has to be broken up.

Don't go for the collar. Dogs play and fight by going for the neck/collar area. That is where the teeth are going to be. Instead grab the back legs or the tail, and pull the dogs apart. If necessary pull them way in a circle pattern. With the back legs up in the air, the dog does not have enough power in the front to continue to lunge and fight indefinitely. But you can gain ground, especially if the other dog is on some form of a tether.

Sometimes the other owner is flat out useless. They will not help in separating their own dog. This is what I have to do if mine get into a real fight, because I am all there is -- no one else there to help break it up. I grab a tail, because I can do that one-handed. And I will pull both dogs by that tail until one of them is mostly through a gateway. Then I use the other hand to move the gate in between the dogs while I will generally grab the collar at that point of the dog on my side and try to gain ground whenever the other is trying for a better grip. It isn't ideal, but I haven't been bitten yet this way.

If you can slip a lead over one of the fighting dogs and connect it to a fence or tree, then you can grab the other dog by the legs and circle him out of the situation.

Really, though, once you see a potential problem coming your way, make way. It is not worth cleaning wounds and vet visits to exercise your right to the side walk, park, or dog park. Carry a small air horn or compressed air, and use it if necessary. Usually, I find that just my voice and maybe a stomp with my shoe on the ground will back down most dogs. Practice something like "GO HOME!" in your fiercest, I-tear-rottweilers-apart-with-my bare-hands voice. Remember the little black girl in Police Academy with the little baby voice? Dogs and thugs aren't going to respect that. You need to have an I mean business voice. Think Harry Potter, and unforgiveable curses -- you have to mean it. You have to act, not react. You have to remain calm, take control, after it is all over, then you can break down and get scared. That doesn't mean you do not act fast and with conviction, even harshness. Just don't panic and throw your hand in there so you have a bloody stump. That doesn't do anyone any good.

Outside dogs -- other people's dogs are pretty easy to cow. When they are your own dogs, you have a different set of positives and negatives. Your own dogs do not view you as an unknown, so stamping your feet at them and hurtling a GO HOME at them isn't going to work. Since if they aren't trained, it is your fault, you can have a certain amount of training that may work at the right moment. And yes you should pick on the dog that is the weaker, the one that doesn't want to fight, and drive it through the gate or away from the fight. To break up two formidable dogs who are fighting on your own -- anything is fair. Grab a chair and drive it through where their teeth are. All you need is enough surprise to get one through to safety, and then everyone can calm down. The quicker it is over, the less injury everyone is going to have.

This weekend, I had my nieces over. They are eight. They cannot help break up fights. They should not witness them. Cujo was doing really well with Babsy. But for the most part I had them separate. Babs will be jealous. And toward the end, they were both in my room along with me and one of the girls and Babs snarled at Cujo, Cujo leaped to the defense and it was on, and I came down so hard, so fast, and had the old lady through the baby gate so quickly that no one got hurt. Then I realized I put Babs in with Hepzibah. They generally get along ok. But they are two females, and, when one is in fight mode, it could get ugly quick. I put Cujo in the living room and then went down and crated Hepsi and all was fine.
01-23-2015 07:50 AM
JoanMcM Tail grabbing - and the motion is to grab the tail, then let go quick with hands up when your dog turns around.
01-22-2015 02:50 AM
JoanMcM Ernie is a 30 lb Yorkshire? Then he is not a Yorkshire...maybe a mix. Yorksire
s are way smaller.

I think your dog has enough dogs to play with your own family group. I would not force a relationship between dogs that is going to stress the people out. Terriers are feisty, stubborn, and if he is not being handled correctly there is no way this is going to turn around. Dogs like people do not have to get along with everyone. No sense stressing about it.

Yeah....never stick your hand into the middle of a dog fight. You only do that once. I agree with Selzer...grab YOUR dog's tail if you don t have a leash on it. I would not grab anything until someone else was grabbing their dog. Both owners should do it at the same time.
01-22-2015 12:16 AM
selzer Uhm, they asked for a better way to break up fights, and I was trying to answer that. Sorry you have a headache. It was not intended as a fight at all.
01-21-2015 10:26 PM
Nikitta This fight with each other post is giving me a headache. Stick with giving good advice and stop letting all your egos inflate. This is not about YOU, its about constructive advice for someone with a problem.
01-21-2015 10:10 PM
selzer There are ways to break up fights. Usually you can avoid them by being aware and managing the distance between the dogs, controlling your own dog, etc. I know that might not sound fair, but the facts are that you can only adjust your own behavior and no one else's. So, if you want to keep your dog save, keep your radar on, and when you see Idiot Owner with Aggressive Dog, get your dogs under control, and safely away from the other dog.

Also, don't engage in activities that are likely to create problems with unknown dogs, like throwing toys or giving out treats in a crowd. I know a lot of people like to walk multiple dogs. Personally, I think it is best to be responsible for one dog at a time in public. It definitely keeps your dogs safer.

But that is all prevention and not breaking up a fight in progress. It is the optimum thing to do, of course, but sometimes there is a fight, and it has to be broken up.

Don't go for the collar. Dogs play and fight by going for the neck/collar area. That is where the teeth are going to be. Instead grab the back legs or the tail, and pull the dogs apart. If necessary pull them way in a circle pattern. With the back legs up in the air, the dog does not have enough power in the front to continue to lunge and fight indefinitely. But you can gain ground, especially if the other dog is on some form of a tether.

Sometimes the other owner is flat out useless. They will not help in separating their own dog. This is what I have to do if mine get into a real fight, because I am all there is -- no one else there to help break it up. I grab a tail, because I can do that one-handed. And I will pull both dogs by that tail until one of them is mostly through a gateway. Then I use the other hand to move the gate in between the dogs while I will generally grab the collar at that point of the dog on my side and try to gain ground whenever the other is trying for a better grip. It isn't ideal, but I haven't been bitten yet this way.

If you can slip a lead over one of the fighting dogs and connect it to a fence or tree, then you can grab the other dog by the legs and circle him out of the situation.

Really, though, once you see a potential problem coming your way, make way. It is not worth cleaning wounds and vet visits to exercise your right to the side walk, park, or dog park. Carry a small air horn or compressed air, and use it if necessary. Usually, I find that just my voice and maybe a stomp with my shoe on the ground will back down most dogs. Practice something like "GO HOME!" in your fiercest, I-tear-rottweilers-apart-with-my bare-hands voice. Remember the little black girl in Police Academy with the little baby voice? Dogs and thugs aren't going to respect that. You need to have an I mean business voice. Think Harry Potter, and unforgiveable curses -- you have to mean it. You have to act, not react. You have to remain calm, take control, after it is all over, then you can break down and get scared. That doesn't mean you do not act fast and with conviction, even harshness. Just don't panic and throw your hand in there so you have a bloody stump. That doesn't do anyone any good.

Outside dogs -- other people's dogs are pretty easy to cow. When they are your own dogs, you have a different set of positives and negatives. Your own dogs do not view you as an unknown, so stamping your feet at them and hurtling a GO HOME at them isn't going to work. Since if they aren't trained, it is your fault, you can have a certain amount of training that may work at the right moment. And yes you should pick on the dog that is the weaker, the one that doesn't want to fight, and drive it through the gate or away from the fight. To break up two formidable dogs who are fighting on your own -- anything is fair. Grab a chair and drive it through where their teeth are. All you need is enough surprise to get one through to safety, and then everyone can calm down. The quicker it is over, the less injury everyone is going to have.

This weekend, I had my nieces over. They are eight. They cannot help break up fights. They should not witness them. Cujo was doing really well with Babsy. But for the most part I had them separate. Babs will be jealous. And toward the end, they were both in my room along with me and one of the girls and Babs snarled at Cujo, Cujo leaped to the defense and it was on, and I came down so hard, so fast, and had the old lady through the baby gate so quickly that no one got hurt. Then I realized I put Babs in with Hepzibah. They generally get along ok. But they are two females, and, when one is in fight mode, it could get ugly quick. I put Cujo in the living room and then went down and crated Hepsi and all was fine.
01-21-2015 04:57 PM
levous I can answer one question posed by those that doubt the terriers aggression. The reason earnie hates my dog, specifically, is that the owner has been leaving him in my neighbors fence since he was a puppy. My neighbor and I share a driveway. We live in the city. The houses are 12 feet apart. The terrier had become very territorial about the yard and driveway. He has been barking through the fend for years. It is only lately that we encounter him out in the hood. He now sees us as the enemy because he's been allowed to show aggression to us for years. I can't hbdi the past. In the future, I will not allow dogs to show aggression onor near my property. I didn't realize how bad this could get.
01-21-2015 04:51 PM
levous I didn't read the responses in detail since my last post but it sounded like there was some judgemental criticism of my handling of the situation. I want to reiterate that the terrier attacked me, unprovoked, in my driveway when I was alone. In that case, he reached the end of his rope and failed to reach me. When he got into it with my dog, he was on a long, thin rope, not a leash, and grabbing that was impossible. In both cases, all cases really, this aggressive dogs sits like an angel until you get within a few feet... Then he viscously attacks. It happened, yet again, this morning. When I saw them coming, I leashed my dogs and stayed far, far away. There were about 6 other dogs, off leash, and all were happy and friendly. As we passed earnie, giving him a wide berth, he went bananas and tried to get to us. It's absolutely disgusting but there is nothing I can do other than avoid him and leash my dogs as a precaution.

If there is a better way to break up a dog fight, I would love to hear about it. Perhaps the people who are saying there is a better way and that I don't know what I'm doing could instead offer their wisdom and experience rather than simple criticism.

I'm sharing because I hope others can avoid my misfortunes. I can certainly take being called an idiot but please tell all of us why. Also explain the right thing to do. Saying the story doesn't add up is just contentious and counter productive.

To further aggravate the situation, the owner has started bringing his dog by my neighbor's house and coming on my property, again. Im quite concerned that this is not the end of the tale.
12-26-2014 05:09 PM
selzer
Quote:
Originally Posted by Galathiel View Post
Third "paragraph" in the quote .. OP was alone at the car when the dog charged to attack ... just because it didn't get to actually bite doesn't equate to its not having TRIED. 'shrug' The OP perceived it as an attack so, yes, they would label a dog that did that as HA.
The dog's owner is oblivious and yet he or she managed to keep a determined, human aggressive dog from biting someone out of the blue? It doesn't add up, really. The dog hangs out with the other dogs and people. Even after the incident in the third paragraph in the quote, the op allowed his dog to play off leash, even though he saw the dog arrive on the scene with his long rope. And when a fight broke out, he went in and tried to grab his dog by the collar.

This is the problem. The OP needs to know how to break up dog fights so no one gets bitten.

It was only after the guy got himself bitten that he is now claiming the dog is human aggressive. And that bite doesn't count. If you try to grab a collar when dogs are fighting the bite is on you, not the dogs.

The op has not even asked what would be a better way to break up the fight. The one dog was on a tether, breaking it up safely would have been a piece of cake, if he knew how to do it.
12-26-2014 05:01 PM
selzer
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jax08 View Post
I did not miss anything Selzer, including your condescending attitude where you think it's appropriate to tell others what they can and can't post. Sorry, you don't impress me. I'm not one of your groupies that you can buffalo into thinking you are a great breeder with mountains of knowledge and I'm not going to allow you to speak to me as if I'm some newb that has never had a dog. So how about you just stay on your side the fence and I'll stay on mine.


The bottom line is the OP needs to avoid this dog. He can't control another persons dog. He can't control when the other dog will attack, even though his dog is NOT the one with the issue.

OP - just out of curiosity, is your dog neutered? Is the terrier? My friend who owns Irish Terriers has often told me that it's hard for other dogs to read terrier body language because their bodies are always tense looking with their tails up. So is your dog reacting, in any way, to the body language of this dog? It could be a minute action that sets them off. Just do your dog a favor and avoid this dog. It's not fun dealing with a dog aggressive dog, especially when it's caused by something stupid that could have been prevented.
Michelle, Merry Christmas and Happy New Years to you too.

A bite that happens when breaking up a fight does not constitute human aggression.

Most of the time when a dog wants to bite a human, it does. Lots of people do indeed read dogs incorrectly, none of us know all the new posters and their experience with reading dogs.

This is a dog that hangs out with other dogs AND people. But when the OP shows up with his/her dogs, the dog has issues with his/her dogs, and I guess now with him or her. I NEVER suggest the person not post. I suggested that by what the person posted I would not call it human aggressive. Nor would I call it unpredictable.

The OP knows the dog is trouble, and that the dog he or she owns will fight too, so he or she needs to prevent fights from occuring. And at least put the dog on lead if you see the other dog in the vacinity, and don't throw your toy so that your dog will return within the problem dog's leash length.

What I continue to wonder is why the dog seems to do fine with other people and their dogs, but has a problem with the OP and his/her dogs. I guess it doesn't really matter.
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