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Thread: In Survival Mode: Crate Despair Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
08-04-2014 01:49 PM
WateryTart
Quote:
Originally Posted by AngelaHazle View Post
Ok well so far being around him while he's in the crate doesn't help. He still whines whether he's near us or 2 rooms away. He doesn't whine for long, just at first. I'm sure it's because he doesn't like being in there. Does anyone have some tips for helping him like being in the crate? I feed him in there. I keep some water in there. He has a blanket and toys. I've pet him in there. I've played with him in there. I've fed him treats in there... still he can't wait to get out, whines as soon as we put him in, and barrels out and goes crazy as soon as the door is open.
I went to the ASPCA website and downloaded their "weekend crate training" method, printed it out, memorized it, and then adapted it.

My girl had to get used to a crate right away because of her homing date not matching up with my planned vacation. I felt kind of bad about that, so I backtracked as soon as I was off work for a couple of weeks and spread the "weekend" method over about ten days. Worked like a charm. She was "kennel!"-ing like a champ even before she learned to like the crate, and now she's good with hanging out in there most of the times I want to put her in there for a short period.
08-04-2014 01:44 PM
WateryTart
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pawsed View Post
I'm sorry, but I don't understand why you would want to let a puppy cry. If it teaches the pup that when it cries, I will come, I think that's a good thing. I want the puppy to let me know when she's in trouble, and it's up to me to help her and reassure her that she's okay. It's my job to make her as secure as I can and not force her to be responsible for things she may not be ready to do, like be on her own locked in a crate away from everyone, totally independent of me.

There will be a time when she's ready for that, but when you first bring her home, she's like any other child. I'm sure a lot of people will disagree, but I think a little spoiling now makes a pup more confident down the line.

Just curious to know if you let your children cry themselves to sleep when you first brought them home from the hospital.
I don't have kids, but I used what I jokingly termed "cry it out" with my puppy. The first couple of nights, I interpreted a prolonged crying (more than a minute or so with no break) to mean she might be distressed because she needed to go outside, in which case I'd take her out, let her do her business, and bring her right back in. After that, I was kind of able to tell when she was just hoping for attention and when she really needed something.

Truthfully, I did have a hard time with it. I hated hearing her cry. But after a few nights of scheduled bathroom breaks and ignoring otherwise, she settled right in. I slept on the couch until we got the second crate set up in the bedroom, and thereafter we crated her next to the bed at night. We haven't had her very long, but it hasn't seemed to adversely affect her bond with us.

I don't know the ins and outs of "cry it out" with a human child. It sounds viable to me. But I also don't tolerate sleep interruption particularly well and wouldn't be all that sympathetic after the first few nights. I know myself well enough to know I'd turn on a dime from "poor thing, I hate this" to "UNLESS YOU ARE BLEEDING OR SPONTANEOUSLY COMBUSTING, PUT A LID ON IT SO I CAN SLEEP!"
08-04-2014 09:58 AM
readmeli Keep it up! A few minutes whining at his age is great, like Cassidy's Mom said.

I promise just keep it up and it will all work out and pretty soon you will have a wonderfully crate-trained pup. Just takes a little patience. I went through the EXACT thing with my pup, and now here we are... The crate is her BFF I think and she's always happy to go run into it!

Do you give him a nice tasty treat when he goes in? This helped alot with my pup. Chicken jerky is her treat of choice. She'll do anything for chicken jerky.
08-03-2014 12:06 PM
Cassidy's Mom
Quote:
Originally Posted by AngelaHazle View Post
Ok well so far being around him while he's in the crate doesn't help. He still whines whether he's near us or 2 rooms away. He doesn't whine for long, just at first.
I'm not sure I understand why this is a problem. From your previous post he's just over 3 months old and you've only had him a week. A little fussing at first is pretty typical, and as long as he settles down within a few minutes, that's good!

Do you know if whoever you got him from did any crate training with him? It takes some time for puppies to learn to love their crates, sometimes a few weeks, sometimes a few months. I would also expect him to be excited when he comes out too, so I don't see that as a huge problem either. Both my dogs go into their crates on their own and have been for years. They're almost 9, and a little over 5-1/2 years old and sleep in their crates in our bedroom every night. But after all that time, they're still very happy and excited when they come out in the morning.

Give it some time. I'm sure he'll adjust quickly. When mine were puppies I kept the leash on top of the crate, and as I opened the door I reached in and grabbed the collar so I could attach the leash while puppy was still in the crate rather than letting him/her out and then trying to get ahold of them. Usually they needed to be rushed out right away for potties, so I didn't want them to have the opportunity to stop and squat before I got the leash on and ran them outside.
08-03-2014 08:45 AM
AngelaHazle Ok well so far being around him while he's in the crate doesn't help. He still whines whether he's near us or 2 rooms away. He doesn't whine for long, just at first. I'm sure it's because he doesn't like being in there. Does anyone have some tips for helping him like being in the crate? I feed him in there. I keep some water in there. He has a blanket and toys. I've pet him in there. I've played with him in there. I've fed him treats in there... still he can't wait to get out, whines as soon as we put him in, and barrels out and goes crazy as soon as the door is open.
07-27-2014 11:26 AM
Sp00ks I agree with the others, Move the crate to your bedroom. Don't leave him alone in another room of the house at night. Your still going to have to put up with him crying but I think he will settle down quicker if he is with you which is likely all he wants.

This is just an opinion, everyone has one but I think the worst thing you could possibly do is allow the dog in the bed with you. Maybe I'm an ass, but I don't want a dog in my bed. Not to mention if I get woke up, it's impossible for me to go back to sleep most of the time.

The fact that he goes in the crate by himself on any occasion kind of tells me the crate isn't the problem. Try moving it to the bedroom and see if that doesn't help.
07-27-2014 11:05 AM
AngelaHazle I have been having a little trouble with whining, but it's not constant. My pup is just over 3 months old, got him a week ago. He whines when we first walk away from the crate and then in the morning when (I guess) he is really wanting out. I think with time (as it was with my previous dogs) he will "give up" and the whining will lessen and then stop. I would, however, like help with dealing with him when I go to get him out. I will sit in front of the crate until he stops jumping and barking and then I will undo the first latch. Half the time he will start jumping again, but half the time he's ok. Even when I get him to stop jumping and going crazy the second I open the door he barrels out and runs all over the place. I get that he's just excited about getting out and that he has to potty, but I would like some suggestions on how to get him not to jump and be crazy once the door is open. I do take him out immediately from the crate, but I need him to be calm enough to put the leash on.
07-12-2014 06:37 PM
Longfisher
Bed

I posted in this thread earlier that the puppy should just be allowed to sleep at the foot of your bed. Then I read many subsequent posts suggesting that the crate be close to the bed, bedroom, etc. and that this reduced the whining.

So, let me amend my previous post. Our two sequentially owned GSDs were allowed to sleep at the foot of the bed (in the bed but on top of the comforter) for about 1 month after we brought them home and....wait for it...WE DIDN'T LOSE A SINGLE NIGHT'S SLEEP but for the requirement to get up and take them outside if they stood in the bed and milled around.

LF
07-12-2014 08:07 AM
Pawsed I'm sure you believe everything you said, but I disagree and my experience reinforces what I feel, as yours does you. How you do know they will turn out the way you say, if you have never tried a different approach? There are always alternatives. Maybe even a better one than the one you use, or I use, for that matter.

Our puppies over the last nearly 50 years of owning all types, but always including at least one German Shepherd, have done just fine with being treated pretty much like kids. They are and have been secure, confident dogs, with no separation anxiety and without crying all the time for attention. They like their crates and still sleep in them every night with the doors wide open. They are happy and safe in there. And we all got more rest when they were small and they didn't cry or mess their crates, when they were moved into them.

Dogs and children have the same needs, the same insecurities, and the same emotions and feelings. We are all animals, not better or worse. We have different capabilities and means of communication, but, in my opinion, those things don't make them less or more than we are.

Don't misunderstand, we are the leaders here and we have rules and expect them to be followed. Our dogs are well trained and people are always impressed with how well they behave and how well they get along with everyone. Maybe we've just been lucky.
07-12-2014 05:19 AM
Sarah~
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pawsed View Post
I'm sorry, but I don't understand why you would want to let a puppy cry. If it teaches the pup that when it cries, I will come, I think that's a good thing. I want the puppy to let me know when she's in trouble, and it's up to me to help her and reassure her that she's okay. It's my job to make her as secure as I can and not force her to be responsible for things she may not be ready to do, like be on her own locked in a crate away from everyone, totally independent of me.

There will be a time when she's ready for that, but when you first bring her home, she's like any other child. I'm sure a lot of people will disagree, but I think a little spoiling now makes a pup more confident down the line.

Just curious to know if you let your children cry themselves to sleep when you first brought them home from the hospital.
Because then the puppy learns all they have to do to make you pay attention to them is cry and they will never stop. If a dog is in trouble they will let you know regardless of crate training... Many, many, many dogs go through crate training just fine. Both of mine did, and they both threw a fit at first, but a fluffy stuffed animal and an old shirt of mine solved that within a couple of days. Nobody wants their puppy to be upset! But, you do not want to spoil them and create a dog that has separation anxiety, who only goes into the crate when he's ready, and constantly cries for attention. They are puppies, not human babies, you wouldn't talk to or treat a kid like a dog so it makes sense not to treat dogs like kids
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