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Thread: What's fear aggression Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
06-26-2014 11:47 AM
lalachka Yep, to me too))))) yeah I will check it out.

Actually, my trainer already told me what to do. I just have to do it.

But I have to condition him to the Ecollar and I haven't finished it yet)))))
06-26-2014 11:11 AM
atravis
Quote:
Originally Posted by lalachka View Post
Fast forward to 4:50

This got recorded by accident. It was dumb of me to have him there off leash knowing that they fight but when we train there he has always ignored the cat.

2014-06-13 Boomer, i'm an idiot - YouTube
This to me looks like a purely predatory response, not so much any sort of fear aggression.

You can see the progression from interest, to arousal, to chase/catch pretty clearly.

The Lou Castle "crittering" method might not be a bad thing for you to do some research on if you haven't, at least for this particular issue.
06-26-2014 10:20 AM
lalachka About hand targeting and shake paws. In my experience, it has to be something dynamic. Like just having him sit is not enough for him. He will break his neck looking that way and it's cemented in that position. I can't move it with my hands (lol yes I tried)))

So for me it has to be a lot of movement. I usually can't have him watch me if the trigger is close. So it depends on how close it is too.
06-26-2014 10:15 AM
lalachka Yep, onyx girl summed it up nicely. It's all about noticing that he's about to react. That means that you notice all the triggers before he does, then - for me there's always a dilemma

Do I distract him and my goal is that he doesn't notice? Or do I let him see it and then work on distracting.


My trainer had me move back while giving him treats. Like I'm walking backwards and luring him with treats in a way. Or a few times if there was enough space (our sidewalks are tiny sometimes, so I can't just step aside and work with him, sometimes I have to go the other way away from the trigger) put him in a sit not facing the trigger and have him watch me and treat. Tug, any toy, I have a rock he loves and if I kick it - he will go crazy chasing it. Anything your dog can do to forget about it. (She said rock is a bad idea, files their teeth down. Too bad)


If you didn't notice early enough and he reacted then just walk away fast. Not much you can do, he can't hear or see you.

Also, if there's a trigger - just walking two steps, turn, two steps, turn, helps. The turns take their mind off it.

To sum it up. Notice before they do and distract them.
06-26-2014 09:23 AM
onyx'girl
Quote:
Originally Posted by Professor Fluffybottom View Post
I am curious what your trainer told you to do to re-direct the dog?
I have read about having your dog do targeting (touching his nose to your hand) when he is scared or unsure but that is the only advice I have found with regard to teaching an alternate response to fear. I would like to learn some other options.
I was thinking about teaching my dog to shake hands when he is fearful, because he naturally uses his paws when he wants something, and we use shake as his most common command.
Just doing some obedience is a great way to redirect or diffuse a potential situation. Or popping out a tug and start playing with the dog. Hand target is a good idea(as well as the paw/shake) but I'd rather get the dog into another frame of mind and keep it going for a few minutes until the situation that the dog was going to react to dissolves.
Best to always be proactive and not let the dog zone in to start that reactivity....
06-26-2014 03:44 AM
Professor Fluffybottom
Quote:
Originally Posted by lalachka View Post
Yep, that's what I've been told about him by trainers that saw him. He's being a punk. He's not invested in his reactions, just a habit by now. He gives off a ton of warnings and it's pretty easy to redirect him.

One trainer showed me how to redirect and it worked every time with dogs. I'm still doing what she showed.

With people though, he doesn't react to every person. So do I just redirect every time I see a person? There are tons of people outside lol.

Like I can't catch his trigger. With dogs it's easy. He sees a dog and he will react. With people - I can't catch how he picks them.

I know some triggers, a person walking towards him fast, either looking at him or talking to him. Or just talking to him.

Like there would be people standing right next to him and nothing. Then they go 'ohh what a doggie' and he blows up

But last night - I'm lost. I'm really hoping he thought it was a dog otherwise I don't know how to fix it



ETA I'm saying I don't know how to fix it because he let 100 people on hundred different days go by and didn't react. I don't know what triggered last night and not sure how to fix it
I am curious what your trainer told you to do to re-direct the dog?
I have read about having your dog do targeting (touching his nose to your hand) when he is scared or unsure but that is the only advice I have found with regard to teaching an alternate response to fear. I would like to learn some other options.
I was thinking about teaching my dog to shake hands when he is fearful, because he naturally uses his paws when he wants something, and we use shake as his most common command.
06-26-2014 02:05 AM
lalachka
What's fear aggression

Fast forward to 4:50

This got recorded by accident. It was dumb of me to have him there off leash knowing that they fight but when we train there he has always ignored the cat.

http://youtu.be/ZS1czw39EUE
06-26-2014 01:56 AM
lalachka Yep same here, used to hide and now doesn't.
I will try watching his body language though I'm usually not thinking about studying him when this happens)))))

I will post a video of him attacking my cat. Interested in comments about body language
06-25-2014 09:40 PM
lauren43
What's fear aggression

If you see a fear aggressive dog react, you can actually see the difference. They do look and sound big and tough but if you know anything about dog body language, you will see: a dog that is unsure about what they are doing. A dog that is leaning more backward than forward. Generally a dog with ears back and tail tucked.

My Avery was fear reactive (he would get close, but he generally didn't take that next step to actually bite). He would bark like crazy at any new person. But if they walked towards him, he would back off. He was very nervous in his big loud get away from me bark.

Also I should note that when I got him it did start as a flight behavior. He would run and hide behind me and ever so often he would do a low growl...but over time it escalated. To the point that at flyball another person couldn't be in the ring with us with out him freaking out.


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06-25-2014 08:59 PM
llombardo
Quote:
Originally Posted by lalachka View Post
What did you learn? I'm not being rude. Seriously interested. I couldn't understand it from your post

I love studying their body language and reactions, wish I can learn more
All the dogs reacted differently in every test. It was an experience seeing all these GSDs from different lines react so many different ways. You could see the aloofness in some of them, some had stronger protective instincts, some enjoyed people touching them, etc. You could see the aggression in some, the stress level in each was different and it was clear which ones were really stressed out. The protective instinct test was really interesting, because only one GSD actually lunged and barked at the scary stranger, which I didn't think was to scary...LOL. My male is a therapy dog and the scary guy was comparable to a hospital patient walking with a walker screaming, which was on the test to get him certified. My male held his ground and every time "scary" guy came closer my dog moved toward him. Finally the evaluator told "scary" guy to stop because he was amusing my dog LOL.
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