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Topic Review (Newest First)
05-26-2014 11:07 PM
SuperG
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cara Fusinato View Post
Nope. Crate trained = x-pen trained = tent trained. They just enjoyed the time and watched through the windows. I have had 4/5 dogs in the tents with no issues whatsoever.

Just remember to be on leash/tether/whatever all the time. There are SO many stories of people camping or hiking, the dog bolting after something or sniffing off from camp or slipping a tie out and walking away, and never being heard of again. I have hiked all over California's Sierras with my dogs on leash for 10+ years and have come home with them every time safely. We have heard thunder, gunshot, seen squirrels, encountered snakes, seen horses, other dogs, a bear at quite a distance, etc. Safe is safe though.

Two years ago we had the young shepherd on leash at the end of a 10 mile (round trip) hike. JUST 1/4 mile from the car a doe deer became fixated on the dog. She wanted that dog. She flanked us, chased us, got in front of us, rushed us. My husband was warding her off with his walking stick, I was running uphill draggng the dog who curiously wanted to go meet this creature (not even barking at it, just like, HEY THERE). If he had not been on leash at that moment, no matter how much control I normally have over him, I know I would no longer have my dog (chase off, attacked by the deer, who knows).

There are great places for off leash control and places where too many strange things can happen to risk it. Just thought I would mention. Keep safe out there in the wilderness.
Your mentality of being prepared and expecting the unexpected is duly noted...which is the main impetus for my original question...I like your thinking...thank you.

SuperG
05-26-2014 10:50 PM
Cara Fusinato Nope. Crate trained = x-pen trained = tent trained. They just enjoyed the time and watched through the windows. I have had 4/5 dogs in the tents with no issues whatsoever.

Just remember to be on leash/tether/whatever all the time. There are SO many stories of people camping or hiking, the dog bolting after something or sniffing off from camp or slipping a tie out and walking away, and never being heard of again. I have hiked all over California's Sierras with my dogs on leash for 10+ years and have come home with them every time safely. We have heard thunder, gunshot, seen squirrels, encountered snakes, seen horses, other dogs, a bear at quite a distance, etc. Safe is safe though.

Two years ago we had the young shepherd on leash at the end of a 10 mile (round trip) hike. JUST 1/4 mile from the car a doe deer became fixated on the dog. She wanted that dog. She flanked us, chased us, got in front of us, rushed us. My husband was warding her off with his walking stick, I was running uphill draggng the dog who curiously wanted to go meet this creature (not even barking at it, just like, HEY THERE). If he had not been on leash at that moment, no matter how much control I normally have over him, I know I would no longer have my dog (chase off, attacked by the deer, who knows).

There are great places for off leash control and places where too many strange things can happen to risk it. Just thought I would mention. Keep safe out there in the wilderness.
05-26-2014 10:36 PM
SuperG
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cara Fusinato View Post
When we camp, we either take an x-pen or I bought a 2-man tent with a lot of mesh on the top just for the dogs. I like the tent the best because the floor is clean, nothing can crawl in like snakes or squirrels, and the mesh top keeps the mosquitoes out. They go in the RV with us at night. Before the RV we had a large 2-room tent and I just let our two big Aussies sac out on the cots in the tent while we were out and about the campsite.
And they never tried to break out or trash the place ?? Interesting....sounds like your dogs are "grown up"....LOL


SuperG
05-26-2014 10:34 PM
SuperG
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chip18 View Post
Here is a thought, it's certainly going to take time and is not 100% bullet proof but GSD are very smart!

There is the possibility that you could train her to respect a "portable boundary" flags or boxes make a big square put her inside and make it clear to her that she is "not" to exceed the boundaries!

"On the lawn" is my command for my guy. I always used it with my guy on our front yard. I did not realize it was a :command till one day on a walk returning home, I unclipped him and said "on the lawn" I watched stunned as he "wobbled" (disability) down the side walk and onto our front yard, three houses away!!

I was stunned...hey I'm better than I thought! Just an idea not a recommendation!
Chip18,

The idea of portable boundaries does not make just great sense but also allows for interaction between dog and owner....never quit exploring the capabilities of a dog...and you are hitting on one. I will have to say...I would not feel comfortable in this particular situation at the present time BUT as this different environment is experienced by all involved...no doubt...a protocol of behavior will be expected and enforced...but...to be kind to the dog...I have to learn the lay of the land first....

Your success with your GSD which gets the "on the lawn" comes as no surprise on behalf of the dog...more a testimony to the trainer and ability to communicate...good job.


SuperG
05-26-2014 10:26 PM
SuperG
Quote:
Originally Posted by GatorBytes View Post
I would use a chest harness. You don't want to have neck damage, nerve, soft tissue or vertebrae.
I cannot disagree...makes great sense....and makes me consider it might be the prefect time and use for a harness.

SuperG
05-26-2014 10:25 PM
SuperG
Quote:
Originally Posted by ksotto333 View Post
We do camp with Tess, and have had to tether her on occasion. I walked her to the end so she can feel the tension, then back and forth. She hasn't yet hit it hard so I don't know if that actually works but they are pretty smart. Mostly we tend to camp in isolated campgrounds so it's not an issue.
I like your thoughts...I as well will show her the ends of her tether and hope she exhibits the same comprehension as your dog.

Thanks,

SuperG
05-26-2014 10:23 PM
SuperG
Quote:
Originally Posted by Liesje View Post
Do you have reason to be concerned? If she's got a habit of chasing prey or something like that I would use a longer leash (10-15') and hold that rather than a 30' tie-out. Or use a prong or e-collar if you need the control. Our dog is obsessed with rabbits, squirrels, etc but on the tie-out he knew exactly how much line he had and wouldn't check himself hard. Even playing with other dogs he knew to chase in large circles and it wasn't an issue.
I guess my main concern is, this is completely new to me...I fully expect the dog to be on a down/stay next to my side as she always does when I spend an hour or two in the evening on the back deck...but...since there will be other people and dogs in a camping environment perhaps...while I am proofing her, she or I might fail. I am just trying to stay a step or two ahead of a GSD...


SuperG
05-26-2014 10:11 PM
GatorBytes I would use a chest harness. You don't want to have neck damage, nerve, soft tissue or vertebrae.
05-26-2014 09:46 PM
Chip18 Here is a thought, it's certainly going to take time and is not 100% bullet proof but GSD are very smart!

There is the possibility that you could train her to respect a "portable boundary" flags or boxes make a big square put her inside and make it clear to her that she is "not" to exceed the boundaries!

"On the lawn" is my command for my guy. I always used it with my guy on our front yard. I did not realize it was a :command till one day on a walk returning home, I unclipped him and said "on the lawn" I watched stunned as he "wobbled" (disability) down the side walk and onto our front yard, three houses away!!

I was stunned...hey I'm better than I thought! Just an idea not a recommendation!
05-26-2014 09:44 PM
Cara Fusinato When we camp, we either take an x-pen or I bought a 2-man tent with a lot of mesh on the top just for the dogs. I like the tent the best because the floor is clean, nothing can crawl in like snakes or squirrels, and the mesh top keeps the mosquitoes out. They go in the RV with us at night. Before the RV we had a large 2-room tent and I just let our two big Aussies sac out on the cots in the tent while we were out and about the campsite.
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