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Thread: help with focused heeling Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
05-26-2014 01:46 PM
blackshep that's all I've been shown so far. We are just starting out
05-26-2014 01:26 PM
Pax8
Quote:
Originally Posted by simba405 View Post
If the dog forges with the first step then the dog clearly doesn't understand the position. Without moving, Can you turn 90 degrees and the dog turns it's entire body with you? if the dog is running around can you give the heel command and the dog comes and stands in the correction position by your leg?

If you answer no to both then you need to go back and do foundation work.

If all you did was hold a treat up and made him follow then the dog never learned any positions. It just knows to follow the treat. Use the treat to lure the dog into the correction position and then mark. Don't even move forward until you can answer yes to both of the above.
Perfect
05-26-2014 01:25 PM
simba405 If the dog forges with the first step then the dog clearly doesn't understand the position. Without moving, Can you turn 90 degrees and the dog turns it's entire body with you? if the dog is running around can you give the heel command and the dog comes and stands in the correction position by your leg?

If you answer no to both then you need to go back and do foundation work.

If all you did was hold a treat up and made him follow then the dog never learned any positions. It just knows to follow the treat. Use the treat to lure the dog into the correction position and then mark. Don't even move forward until you can answer yes to both of the above.
05-26-2014 11:14 AM
blackshep I'll see if I can get a video. I'm sure I make a million mistakes.

I only have my cell phone and something is draining the battery (it's not the battery though), but I can give it a whirl.

I'm not sure if it will sit on the ledge of my arena kickboards, they have a 45 degree pitch to them, but maybe I can find an edge to sit it up on.
05-26-2014 10:28 AM
Jax08
Quote:
Originally Posted by blackshep View Post

I can't tape myself, I am on my own.
sure you can. Get a tripod or something to set your camera on at the level you want. And Heel within that focus area.
05-26-2014 09:27 AM
blackshep I'm not rewarding the forging and I do correct it. When I say it's from the beginning I mean the second I take a few steps, she immediately forges, I correct and we start again. I will take it down to just one step at a time. The forging was only happening when I switched from food to the ball, which I've only used it twice now, as a reward (which I was holding in the wrong place, so that explains part of it). With food she was better.

And yes we are both just learning this, of course I'm making mistakes, that's what happens when you're a beginner and don't have anyone there to help you.

I can't tape myself, I am on my own.

I have tried doing squares, and just straight forward along a wall. I'll try going backwards and sideways too.

My next try with the ball, held at the side of my left shoulder was better, but I still think it was better with treats.
05-24-2014 10:30 AM
Deno This may be off the wall but here goes. I have never been interested in this sort of heelling, but I learned early on that when I would put the ball in my right back pocket while training Dex to heel, he would do what you are looking for perfect. Dex has an off the chart ball drive.
05-23-2014 08:02 PM
simba405 Dog forges because you reward it. You say the dog forges from the beginning but I'm willing to bet that even while he's forging you're still moving forward. Or rewarding. Why would the dog ever change?

The moment the dog forges you correct and stop. Don't ever reward if it's not perfectly correct. If the dog does it wrong then break and start the heel over. Also if your dog can't heel (perfectly aligned with your body) with you turning in place then you're not ready to even be moving. If you step your right leg out and the dog moves then it clearly doesn't understand the position. Foundation work is important in heeling
05-23-2014 04:05 PM
ayoitzrimz One step at a time. One step, stop and sit, another step, stop and sit. Two steps, stop and sit. Correct any forging along the way.

Without seeing the work my first notion is that she doesn't fully understand what fuss is. We try to spend a LOT of time working on basic position. Lots of praise lots of reward without moving a single step. Just clear correct basic position.

The basic position is with the dog sitting on your left with his right shoulder against your left leg. Pciture that at any and all times the dog should be with his right shoulder against your left leg and only reward that. In fact, correct anything other than that.

I think it helps to have a clear mental picture in your head of what correct heeling looks like, because then anything that doesn't fit the picture in your head is clear and easily corrected. It helps consistency. IMO.

Are you always walking forward? trying teaching walking backwards, sideways, 90 degree turns etc.

People also recommend making wide left circles and other people recommend having a second handler help with correction behind the dog (so the correction is coming from straight back and the second handler is ONLY focused on forging). You'd have to speak to your TD / club members about those techniques.

As my TD once told someone who asked him "how do I prevent forging?"
He said: "Never allow" English is his second language. But often I do see inconsistency in handling especially when you are working on something else: let's say you are setting up for an out of motion exercise. You start moving and teh dog starts forging. What do you do? I'd say stop what you are doing and fix the forging but I see people just plowing through to get to the exercise they PLANNED on doing. But sometimes you need to change your plans and address the problem.

Sorry for the rambling, I'm at work so typing this quickly.

Also, a video will help - there are some excellent handlers here that can give you advice if they actually SEE what is happening.
05-23-2014 03:14 PM
blackshep I work on that separately, but that is worth mentioning, thanks!

Ok, thanks everyone. I will try out some different things and see what yields the best results! I'll also take fewer steps at first and gradually build it up, but go back if we are running into trouble.
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