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Thread: Dog Reacts to Other Dogs and Some People. Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
05-12-2014 10:05 PM
Steve Strom At some point or maybe when you have no choice, yeah. Say you're hiking and here comes someone the other way with their dog. My usual plan is step off to the side, sit him and ask them to go by. I feel more in control and able to keep a strange dog from making contact with mine. That's with my friendly, social one or my nervy one.

Others will handle it a different way, but the basic idea is teaching your dog to behave around whatever is stimulating it or distracting it. Does that make more sense ?
05-12-2014 08:52 PM
CharlieB.Barkin
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Strom View Post
Muskeg is more on point then the way I replied. Its not a matter of just hanging out, you teach an alternate behavior. I like sit, at a distance at first because I don't really like to just go on by when there is no distance. I've had too many people not control their dog when there isn't a lot of distance.

But it's an obedience. The dog has to learn to deal with the distractions or whatever the problem may be, and like was said, you set him up to succeed.
Do you mean that there isn't a lot of distance between the dog and the distractions?
05-12-2014 08:16 PM
Steve Strom Muskeg is more on point then the way I replied. Its not a matter of just hanging out, you teach an alternate behavior. I like sit, at a distance at first because I don't really like to just go on by when there is no distance. I've had too many people not control their dog when there isn't a lot of distance.

But it's an obedience. The dog has to learn to deal with the distractions or whatever the problem may be, and like was said, you set him up to succeed.
05-12-2014 08:03 PM
CharlieB.Barkin I took Charlie to the soccer game today and he did pretty good. I had him lay down and I have him a bone with peanut butter in it. He began to focus on the kids more than the bone, so I picked it up and left. I was probably there for 4 minutes. No barking and no freaking out. He remained in adequate control of himself. Is that what I should be doing as I gradually build up the time, until it no longer phases him?
05-12-2014 04:21 PM
Muskeg A soccer game can be distracting for even the best of dogs https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mrtdyeq2hKo. Don't set him up to fail- take him to the game, and walk away before he starts reacting- say at 8 minutes in. Reward him with tug, play, give him an outlet for that prey drive. I don't like the constant nagging "leave it, leave it, leave it". The dog starts building up frustration. Actually, personally I don't even teach "leave it". I teach an alternative command "come", "heel", "on-by".

This just sound like frustrated dog that is triggered by movement. Not an aggressive dog. I have one like that and she's learned to ignore non-important distractions, and respond to my commands even under extreme distraction (skateboards trigger her chase/prey drive the most). It took time, but mostly I made sure to give her an outlet for her drives, and corrected- one correction- inappropriate behavior. Lunging and barking? Nope, that it not OK. Give him alternative behavior. And give him an outlet for his drives- chuck-it, tug, Frisbee.

How much training have you done with him? How much exercise is he getting?
05-12-2014 04:18 PM
Steve Strom Rather then have her get hurt, yeah. I would.
05-12-2014 04:09 PM
CharlieB.Barkin
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Strom View Post
It would be better if you kept him away from there, where he can't do it.
Separate them when I'm not at home?
05-12-2014 03:53 PM
Steve Strom It would be better if you kept him away from there, where he can't do it.
05-12-2014 03:43 PM
CharlieB.Barkin
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Strom View Post
May be you haven't been consistent enough with leave it? Letting him get away with it sometimes. Its kinda like random rewards. Makes him want it that much more. Leave it should be enough with the kids in their backyard. I think you should spend some time on that.

I like using distance to teach them some self control like you are. But if he's reacting like that at 10mins, I agree that you need to do things a little different. Either a little more distance at first or a little less time, you want to give him the chance to have been right. Then over time, you shorten the distance. Be careful about using random people and dogs to work on this though. Its better to have people and dogs you know help you. Keep everything controlled and think safety. Prey drive still means biting.
The difficult thing with Charlie lunging for Tiny when she jumps up on furniture is that I can't always be around to correct it. It's also difficult to time properly. I can certainly try my best as I usually don't find myself correcting that specific behaviour for some reason.
05-12-2014 03:41 PM
CharlieB.Barkin
Quote:
Originally Posted by Twyla View Post
Then the first suggestion is have an eval done. Determine what you are dealing with. Could be anything from over excitement to fear aggression. Without seeing the dog in action, his body language, there isn't a way to give good advice on what to do.

I will make one suggestion however. Things like the soccer games, you seem to be able to predict when your dog will act out. Leave before he reaches that point. Also, keep the leash loose meaning no tension on it.

For the eval, locate a trainer experienced in aggression. Verify the experience and verify they are experienced in large working breeds - even better if GSD experience. You don't want the yank and crank variety, what you are looking for is a balanced approach.
Actually, before I purchased him, the breeder evaluated each puppy to determine their temperament. I'm not sure if that's what you mean. I'll have to look for my dog's file, but my mom and I asked for a mellow, submissive puppy because we didn't want to have any problems between the GSD and the poodle. If I were to have him evaluated, what would the evaluator be looking for? What information would I get out of it and what would I be able to do with that information? I'm guessing that it will allow me to tailor my training methods specifically to Charlie.
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