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Thread: Agression towards 11 yr old son Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
05-01-2014 03:42 PM
Liesje Doesn't matter whether this dog is "aggressive" or not. I was bit several times by a large dog that I personally would not label "aggressive", but holy crap those bites hurt and really did a number on me! I was wearing several layers including a winter coat and was bruised blue/purple/rainbow all over the left side of my body. No torn skin thanks to the winter layers but felt like my insides got shredded and was painful for months. This was just a rambunctious shelter dog that got way overstimulated out on a walk and came up the leash at me. You couldn't PAY me to take a dog like that home, but sure I'll work GSDs with strong aggression and fight drive all day long as long as they aren't treating me like their personal tug toy.
05-01-2014 07:28 AM
wyowolf Thank you,

I learned a lot from this experience. I probably shouldn't have gotten such a large dog to start with, easier for wife/son to handle, a puppy would be perfect in this regard, yes they require lots of attention and training but that's not an issue.

I dont think Bandit is a bad dog at all, but he is NOT good around children, he may be in the future or he may not. I choose not to chance it, especially with his history. For a couple or anyone without kids he could be a great dog.

Like I said, I grew up with a GSD, never had a bit of problem with her. I miss her so much now especially after having a dog again.

Looking at local breeders now, with respect especially towards temperament. I have gotten lots of good advice on what to look for.

I do have a bit of an issue with the Rescue, especially since I found out they have had problems with this dog in the past with children, now i know why this dog was suddenly "available"... but like I said a learning experience for me.

I do have one question, on the NILIF thing, if the dog already ignores you, how do you get its attention and make it ignore you more??

Thank you all for your good advice...

Quote:
Originally Posted by selzer View Post
Well, if I brought home a dog from a shelter or rescue and it was acting aggressively toward a family member, I would return it before anyone was more attached to it. Not a good fit. Maybe not good with kids. Happens. Some dogs are.

Not everyone spends all their waking moments on dog-sites on the internet, learning about dog-behavior, 2-week shutdown, NILIF, dogs and kids, etc. If my parents brought a dog home from the pound when we were kids, and it snarled or barked aggressively at the kids, it would have gone right back. They love dogs, but they wouldn't risk getting their kids bitten for a dog that they didn't even know yet.

Not everyone is equipped to spend the time and money it might take to rehabilitate a dog with a problem when they have kids in the home.

I think it makes a lot more sense for people to remove the dog BEFORE it bites the kid and then has a bite history, and is basically dead in the water.

Maybe it does take some time to let a critter relax in the new family setting. But there are plenty of dogs out there that will take to children right from the get-go, and one of those dogs is probably a better fit for this family.

I don't think that returning an adult rescue because it doesn't get along with a minor child translates in dumping an adolescent GSD after you raised it from a weanling because it no longer matches the furniture.
05-01-2014 12:12 AM
llombardo
Quote:
Originally Posted by selzer View Post
Well, if I brought home a dog from a shelter or rescue and it was acting aggressively toward a family member, I would return it before anyone was more attached to it. Not a good fit. Maybe not good with kids. Happens. Some dogs are.

Not everyone spends all their waking moments on dog-sites on the internet, learning about dog-behavior, 2-week shutdown, NILIF, dogs and kids, etc. If my parents brought a dog home from the pound when we were kids, and it snarled or barked aggressively at the kids, it would have gone right back. They love dogs, but they wouldn't risk getting their kids bitten for a dog that they didn't even know yet.

Not everyone is equipped to spend the time and money it might take to rehabilitate a dog with a problem when they have kids in the home.

I think it makes a lot more sense for people to remove the dog BEFORE it bites the kid and then has a bite history, and is basically dead in the water.

Maybe it does take some time to let a critter relax in the new family setting. But there are plenty of dogs out there that will take to children right from the get-go, and one of those dogs is probably a better fit for this family.

I don't think that returning an adult rescue because it doesn't get along with a minor child translates in dumping an adolescent GSD after you raised it from a weanling because it no longer matches the furniture.
There is a very fine line when using the term aggression. Especially with this breed. There are way to many labeled as aggressive right in the door and that is not fair to each individual dog or the breed in general. This is where research and the internet is a must for those not familiar with a herding, mouthy breed. Rescues are always a risk, because no one knows their history unless the dog was an owner surrender and even in some of those cases the owner themselves had no clue what the behavior was to pass that info along to the rescue. You get what you put into any dog regardless of age or where it came from. If someone doesn't have it in them to take the time to work with a dog that was nipping at ankles or humping, I can not foresee that person going the long haul with a puppy whether it's mouthy or not. Puppies don't come trained of with any manners and with owners that don't put the time in those same puppies end up in shelters or rescue. It starts and ends with the owner and they do indeed decide the fate of any dog they bring into the home. It's not something to take lightly, it's a huge commitment. I'm just tired of hearing that every GSD is aggressive and the minute they show no manners due to lack of training they are returned. It just makes it harder on the dog, but the are just dogs so I guess that don't matter. When we were younger we always had dogs, some nipped when playing, jumped, humped and all those things, we never got rid of any of them. If we would have gotten bit, my mom would have asked us what we did to the dog to deserve it. We were taught early on to respect a dogs space and to learn how to deal with puppy of young dog behaviors and we all lived. If a dog humped us. Which that had happened my mom would tell the dog no and we would move forward, not get rid of the dog.
04-30-2014 11:23 PM
selzer Well, if I brought home a dog from a shelter or rescue and it was acting aggressively toward a family member, I would return it before anyone was more attached to it. Not a good fit. Maybe not good with kids. Happens. Some dogs are.

Not everyone spends all their waking moments on dog-sites on the internet, learning about dog-behavior, 2-week shutdown, NILIF, dogs and kids, etc. If my parents brought a dog home from the pound when we were kids, and it snarled or barked aggressively at the kids, it would have gone right back. They love dogs, but they wouldn't risk getting their kids bitten for a dog that they didn't even know yet.

Not everyone is equipped to spend the time and money it might take to rehabilitate a dog with a problem when they have kids in the home.

I think it makes a lot more sense for people to remove the dog BEFORE it bites the kid and then has a bite history, and is basically dead in the water.

Maybe it does take some time to let a critter relax in the new family setting. But there are plenty of dogs out there that will take to children right from the get-go, and one of those dogs is probably a better fit for this family.

I don't think that returning an adult rescue because it doesn't get along with a minor child translates in dumping an adolescent GSD after you raised it from a weanling because it no longer matches the furniture.
04-30-2014 11:09 PM
llombardo
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sunflowers View Post
Sure you can. You can do anything.

Is it a good idea, when looking at this incident, this 11-year-old's reaction and the rush to get rid of the dog? Maybe not.

What I was saying is that many people get a dog with the expectation that the puppy will be the child's best buddy from the beginning. It takes quite a while to get that good GSD people remember from their childhood.
Well said
04-30-2014 10:19 PM
Sunflowers Sure you can. You can do anything.

Is it a good idea, when looking at this incident, this 11-year-old's reaction and the rush to get rid of the dog? Maybe not.

What I was saying is that many people get a dog with the expectation that the puppy will be the child's best buddy from the beginning. It takes quite a while to get that good GSD people remember from their childhood.
04-30-2014 09:55 PM
sparra
Quote:
Originally Posted by selzer View Post
Sheeze, you can get a GSD puppy. They are not all biting machines. In fact you can teach them to be gentle right from the get go and your boy will be fine.

Maybe some lines are more bitey as puppies and young dogs. But if I suggest that working line GSDs do not make good family pets, I would have my clock cleaned here. Because it isn't true. Working line dogs can make good family pets too.

Some puppies are more of a challenge at the bitey-puppy stage. But the idea that you shouldn't get a GSD because you have an 11 year old is utter nonsense.

A full-grown GSD that you just met nipping at your ankles is a lot more terrifying than puppy biting. I feel for your kid, really. I think you did the right thing. There is no point in getting them more attached only to have to return the dog in a few months because the behavior is either getting worse or not getting better.
Well said
04-30-2014 09:10 PM
selzer Sheeze, you can get a GSD puppy. They are not all biting machines. In fact you can teach them to be gentle right from the get go and your boy will be fine.

Maybe some lines are more bitey as puppies and young dogs. But if I suggest that working line GSDs do not make good family pets, I would have my clock cleaned here. Because it isn't true. Working line dogs can make good family pets too.

Some puppies are more of a challenge at the bitey-puppy stage. But the idea that you shouldn't get a GSD because you have an 11 year old is utter nonsense.

A full-grown GSD that you just met nipping at your ankles is a lot more terrifying than puppy biting. I feel for your kid, really. I think you did the right thing. There is no point in getting them more attached only to have to return the dog in a few months because the behavior is either getting worse or not getting better.
04-30-2014 09:09 PM
Liesje OP I think you did the right thing for your family. Your son should not have to be nervous around his own dog, and with a breed like this that often just makes things worse. They pick up on that sort of thing. He may be a fine dog in another family, either with no kids or very dog-savvy kids, but he doesn't sound right for YOUR family and better to return him sooner than later.
04-30-2014 06:48 PM
llombardo
Quote:
Originally Posted by sparra View Post
I didn't mean hire a trainer......I meant making sure the dog didn't chew on kids legs before they rehomed it......
Who says they didn't? Just because he acted this way in this house does not mean he acted the same way where he came from. My dog was surrendered for nipping at kids. He never once nipped at any child in my house, he in fact is the complete opposite and adores kids. I have never seen a dog like kids as much as the very same dog that was given up for nipping at them. Any dog will test boundaries and it's even more fun for them if there seems to be none set. There is no way to know anything about the dog the OP posted about after 3 days. Any dog that comes from a rescue needs much more time to adjust.
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