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Thread: German Shepherds are a lifetime commitment Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
04-16-2014 01:13 AM
sparra Great post
04-15-2014 09:00 PM
selzer I disagree with the OP.

Dogs are great, they are loyal, and they do great with our leftover time, leftover money, leftover space, leftover food.

Humans aren't so great. When money gets tight, they get edgy, when time gets short, they stress, when space is short, they get antsy, and I don't know but there are a lot of negative behaviors when food gets short. But, if they have a bond with the dog, they generally factor the dog into all of it. Things have to get really tight -- really have a totally unforeseen and impossible to totally plan for problem for someone to give up a dog that they love and have a special bond with.

If the bond isn't there, the worst thing a person can do is to keep a dog because they feel compelled to do so, because of the commitment that they made when they purchased or rescued the dog. Dogs are incredible with how in tune they are with us. They can be bonded to us, and know our moods and what we like and dislike, etc, even if we do not have much of a bond with them. Just because we walk in at night, let the dog out, put his food down and then pass out in front of the TV, doesn't mean the dog cares that little about us.

And so, you can argue how heartless and disloyal we are for giving up a dog that is that in tune with us. But what is really unfortunate is when a dog is desperately trying to please his owner, and his owner is indifferent, or worse yet, feels irritated at how needy the dog seems to be, how they have to find some place to board the dog when the go to the relatives at Christmas, how he has to come home instead of just working a double shift because the dog is going to have to go potty, how the new girlfriend is making noises because he doesn't care about the dog anyway and the dog is shedding hair all over the place.

Keeping the dog for years exuding your irritation that you are tied down to this dog, that you no longer want, but don't want to be one of those people who dump their dog is a gruesome thing for a dog to live with.

And it is SO unnecessary. Someone might be out there that will make your dog the center of their universe. And, the dog WILL bond with that person and forget you -- maybe not forever or totally, if you see the dog in so many months, it may remember you, but that doesn't mean the dog's life might not be better with someone else.

Life changes, and we change. If we have not managed to achieve the give and take relationship with our critter, then do the responsible thing, and try to find the dog a home with someone who will give the dog what he deserves.

Dogs do not need orthopedic beds, doggy day care and spas, professional grooming, expensive toys and treats, or 100$/bag dog food. But they need a person who WANTS them.

If a dog is not wanted, then the human should find someone who does want the dog. It may be that it is crueler to keep a dog in a home where it is not wanted, than it would be to euthanize the dog if no suitable home could be found, like if the dog has a bite history, or has some serious issues.

I think we should go into getting a puppy or a dog with the understanding that this dog will live 10-14 years, will require food, vetting, training, time and attention, and various needs through those years. But if we approach it as a life sentence, we might end up feeling trapped, and may make what could be an awesome relationship be something that is a drag, just because of how we perceive it.

TL/DR, If you don't love the dog, then do the kind thing and let him go to someone who will.
04-15-2014 07:06 PM
JoeyG I think though people mean well they should think more often before they commit. Life happens I do understand but some things can be prevented.

I volunteer with a rescue and someone adopted a young male (gsd rescue) thinking it would work well. When I saw the dog I could see he was more of a working dog and very confident. Needless to say the dog bit her neighbor in the face and was brought back to the rescue... now he faces a slim chance at the life he deserves. This was before I started there. Not that I have any say anyway, I just help out.

I'm on my second gsd and I waited 7 years in between and till my daughter was 3.5 years so she could take a little abuse from the puppy :-) I'm the dog lover and I wanted a friend and protector for her. I worked with him very hard to be socialized and be obedient. Of late I work some much and did well with their bonding that he now often prefers to be with her since he sees less of me. We're close and still play and train but he adores her. Guess my point is waiting those pay off. Also as appose to my first guy who was very dominant this guy is very submissive and friendly. I picked him from the temper of the parents and compared to the other puppies, still high energy though lol

Long story short I hope the dog finds a loving home where he can be a part of it

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04-15-2014 02:27 PM
wyoung2153
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rottendog View Post
I can see both sides here. And the couple looking for a new home for their GSD sounds from the ad as if they are sincere and care for the dog. And I also see where a young couple should be sure of their plans and know full well what they are getting into before bringing in a dog to the family. I wish everyone could stop and use a little judgement before signing on to take in a dog and all the responsibility that goes along with them. But I've seen it many times, the kid gets in the way of the dog and the dog goes outside or to a new home. It's a sad thing but as long as we have people who do not take their responsibility to the dog seriously, it's going to happen. And we are still going to have situations that are not avoidable. Like someone posted earlier, Life Happens. If people would just stop and think before they make that impulse decision, it would help a lot.
Avoid impulse decisions, yes. I had a good friend who adopted Titan's brother at the same time I did.. she was just going with me to pick up Titan and then when seh got there , he had one more pup for sale and she bought him. All was well for a while but she was moving to the states (we were in Germany at the time) and she didn't know what her next unit would be like but thought she could juggle it and she couldn't. She rehomed the dog weeks before I moved there with her.. because she just couldn't do right by him anymore. Thankful she realized that but sad it came to that.

On another note. I am a young person.. in a newish relationship (2 years) I have had titan for 4. When I got him I was single and only had to worry about me. I couldn't predict I would be in a relationship 2 years down the road, or that we would be getting married at some point or any of that. We're talkign about children and a family a few years from now. What if Titan is aggressive toward my children? I can't guarantee he won't. But 4 years ago, there was no reason for me to consider any of that.. there aren't always things that you can plan for.. SO many things in my life have changed and I have been lucky enough to be in a situation to handle it all, but what if I wasn't.. why should I have been painted as a bad person because 4 years ago I was in a perfectly stable environment and now (hypothentically) I'm not. I just don't think that's fair.

I think that some people do not think, I mean at all, and those are the ones that we wish would, but someone who is doing their best and realize they can't, shouldn't be told to "plan better next time" or any of that.. most people do have some sense of planning and do line their ducks up in order to do things the right way. It's not right to say that someone can't get a dog now, because 5 years from now you want a family, or to move cross country, or whatever..
04-15-2014 01:38 PM
sehrgutcsg You GSD owner's are seeing this on a case by case basis. Try the other end of the spectrum. Owning and operating a rescue foundation, where your competition is going out of business, needs to place an entire litter of pup's, several young dog's and several older dog's. Just because this owner has maybe lent her or his own company / foundation, an excess of $200,000.00 to keep the doors open and the ball rolling, these are the hero's that walk unseen in your World you never here about. Let's here it for them, and keep the optimism upbeat, because the guy or girl who never planned, bells palsy, code blue heart attack, double pneumonia, depression and work related injuries, still hates to think about not waking up in the morning, getting on his orher knees, having the morning ritual before coffee with his or her GSD, clamoring for some equal hugs, kisses and the thought of that not happening, could bring it all to a fast and painless end....
04-15-2014 01:23 PM
petite
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lark View Post
I totally agree with this post. I researched like crazy, and still have ended up overwhelmed at times. I had dogs before, but it really didn't compare to the work of my GSD.
Exactly this! I've just started my first GSD journey and I can already tell this is going to be an experience!

As for the re-homing issue, I try not to judge people who have taken good care of a dog and for whatever reason can't continue that care. That is the right thing to do. I am more worried about GSDs dumped at shelters (where they are often judged as an aggressive breed off the bat) or people re-homing dogs that they have abused mentally or physically without disclosing these issues.
04-04-2014 03:21 PM
Rottendog I can see both sides here. And the couple looking for a new home for their GSD sounds from the ad as if they are sincere and care for the dog. And I also see where a young couple should be sure of their plans and know full well what they are getting into before bringing in a dog to the family. I wish everyone could stop and use a little judgement before signing on to take in a dog and all the responsibility that goes along with them. But I've seen it many times, the kid gets in the way of the dog and the dog goes outside or to a new home. It's a sad thing but as long as we have people who do not take their responsibility to the dog seriously, it's going to happen. And we are still going to have situations that are not avoidable. Like someone posted earlier, Life Happens. If people would just stop and think before they make that impulse decision, it would help a lot.
04-03-2014 08:56 PM
TheModestMouse
Quote:
Originally Posted by d4lilbitz View Post
You are WRONG...you are planning ahead. Want is not being guilty of anything. I want lots of things, BUT I know my limits. So do you : ) You're thinking about the commitment and your current situation. You understand what is required and have made the decision to wait until the right time. That's more planning than many : ) Good job!
I appreciate your comment because it takes a lot of determination to not give in. I suppose a good way you can make sure you don't adopt/purchase irresponsibly is to get advice. That has been my biggest help. Usually an honest friend will tell you when your plan seems out of sorts.
04-03-2014 01:06 PM
SuperG Only read the title and I so wish they did last a lifetime....yes, they are a commitment but such an rewarding and wonderful responsibility to take on...

SuperG
04-03-2014 12:43 PM
d4lilbitz
Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter. View Post
Thanks.. My wife told me the boys are asking for another dog to be Rainer's friend, we just look at each other and laugh.. haha.

It'll be interesting to see who wins that battle down the road haha!


[quote=wyoung2153;5317337]When I rehomed my girl, the breeder said it perfectly before I even signed the contract.. she said "Whitney, sometimes LIFE happens.. anythign from deployments, to temperments, to finances, schedules, you name it. If you ever need to rehome Athena, do not be ashamed, I will help you." To me, recognizing the fact that sometimes things happen and it just isn't right, said that was a good breeder.
QUOTE]

I think that is a very responsible breeder and a good thing to do. Great quote by her as well. Life does happen and not always in our favor.

Quote:
Originally Posted by LaRen616 View Post


I have rehomed 3 times, yes it's a lot, yes I would question a person for rehoming that many dogs but I honestly did have that bad of luck, those dogs had issues that I couldn't handle and they didn't fit in with my lifestyle, my dogs or my cats so I did what I thought was best and I rehomed them. I didn't want to keep an animal that I didn't bond with and I definitely didn't want them to feel unloved or not recieve the attention, love and training that they needed. I do not have any regrets, they are all happier where they are now. It does make me look like a bad person but anyone who knows me personally or knows me through Facebook can see that my dogs are my life and they are spoiled rotten. I did not have bad intentions when I got the dogs, things just didn't work out unfortunately.

Also these people are first time parents, they probably didn't expect to be so overwhelmed with having a newborn and a dog, maybe money became tight for them, at least they are trying to rehome the dog to a good home and are not dumping him in a shelter. They sound like they had good intentions, but problems popped up.
I do not think you are a bad owner AT ALL. I think you love your pets very much : ) Each rehoming case is different. Just like people, not all dogs are going to get along...wish they would, but that's reality. Everyone's purpose for rehoming their dog is different. While not everyone might agree with your decision, in the end you did what is best for you, your family and the dogs. We all want our dogs to be happy and have a meaningful life. While I couldn't do it, sometimes that means rehoming them. Me, peronsally, before I bring any new pet into my house, I make sure that they'll all get along...can't imagine having to make a choice to part with one because of behavioral issues towards eachother.
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