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Topic Review (Newest First)
04-02-2014 06:08 PM
CJthePuppy Thank you all so much!! We just need to keep doing what we are doing and we will get through this period.


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04-02-2014 02:52 PM
Chip18
Quote:
Originally Posted by selzer View Post
I agree with keeping moving rather than sitting, at least in the beginning. It is best to just, "Eh! Itsa Dog! in a matter of fact tone, and keep on going. Since you do not want to punish, try to stay below your dog's threshold, and that means, you need to adjust your path BEFORE your dog reacts to a possible issue.

If you adjust where you are going because your dog reacts, than his bad behavior is rewarded. He wants distance between him and the other dog. If you turn around or back away, even pulling him away, than the dog is getting the distances he wants. Much better to see the dog in the distance and before your dog reacts, to act and turn around or whatever you need to do to keep the dog far enough away so it is below your dog's threshold. If you mess up, and your dog reacts, then, "EH! itsa dog!" and move on, but do not turn around to beat it out of there, just move on in such a fashion that in no way can your dog connect with the other dog.

As you increase the training bond, the bond of trust between you and the dog, then you can slowly decrease the distance where you know the dog's threshold is, and move him slowly out of his comfort zone. At this point too, you may in some situations, use the SIT command, instead of moving on, but only if you are relatively sure the other dog owner will not see a well-behaved dog and come over to make friends.

The DOWN command is even tougher. It is hard on a dog to down in situations where he is clearly uncomfortable. I wouldn't do this with a reactive dog, until we are well into training, and have seen tons of progress. And then I would be ready to move on in a heartbeat, if the dog seems to be too stressed. Dogs do need to deal with stress, but you don't want to go backwards either. There really is no reason your dog needs to down in the presence of strange dogs. SIT is enough.
WOW thank you! Exactly this!
04-02-2014 01:53 PM
selzer I agree with keeping moving rather than sitting, at least in the beginning. It is best to just, "Eh! Itsa Dog! in a matter of fact tone, and keep on going. Since you do not want to punish, try to stay below your dog's threshold, and that means, you need to adjust your path BEFORE your dog reacts to a possible issue.

If you adjust where you are going because your dog reacts, than his bad behavior is rewarded. He wants distance between him and the other dog. If you turn around or back away, even pulling him away, than the dog is getting the distances he wants. Much better to see the dog in the distance and before your dog reacts, to act and turn around or whatever you need to do to keep the dog far enough away so it is below your dog's threshold. If you mess up, and your dog reacts, then, "EH! itsa dog!" and move on, but do not turn around to beat it out of there, just move on in such a fashion that in no way can your dog connect with the other dog.

As you increase the training bond, the bond of trust between you and the dog, then you can slowly decrease the distance where you know the dog's threshold is, and move him slowly out of his comfort zone. At this point too, you may in some situations, use the SIT command, instead of moving on, but only if you are relatively sure the other dog owner will not see a well-behaved dog and come over to make friends.

The DOWN command is even tougher. It is hard on a dog to down in situations where he is clearly uncomfortable. I wouldn't do this with a reactive dog, until we are well into training, and have seen tons of progress. And then I would be ready to move on in a heartbeat, if the dog seems to be too stressed. Dogs do need to deal with stress, but you don't want to go backwards either. There really is no reason your dog needs to down in the presence of strange dogs. SIT is enough.
04-02-2014 11:52 AM
Chip18 Not really gonna argue with anything being said just a couple of observations. All my males have been Dominant dogs. And mine were all trained to ignore other dogs and none ever came close to the insane crazy Cesar 911 dogs?

My guys were only told to sit or down when crossing the street or stepping "wide" aside were not an option. Sitting or down allows them to focus on the other dog they could/will/can do it. But that was not a "routine" part of conditioning, if given a choice we simply moved on.

For the most part people seem to view "non dog park' dogs as some sort of ticking time bomb dogacidle manic's waiting for a chance to rip Fido apart???

K9's military dogs and other service dogs don't go to dog parks. Teaching ones dog to ignore other dogs is not some radical new concept??
04-02-2014 09:49 AM
Liesje I would keep the dog away from face-to-face meetings of new dogs and people (daycare is probably fine as long as they say he's OK there). A dog does not HAVE to be walked and be meeting random dogs and people to be happy. The problem is every time he reacts, he's clearly demonstrating he's over his threshold. "Flooding" (continually exposing the dog to whatever sets him off) is not the answer, especially if you don't have full confidence in the dog or your handling abilities and don't have a way to firmly interrupt and correct the behavior. Give him some space as he matures. Use this time to develop a bond with you so that he learns to trust you and be neutral toward other people and dogs. It could be a confidence thing with you more than a temperament thing with him. I had this same problem with the first GSD I raised at this age. I found that once I had confidence in myself and my ability to control my dog (including appropriately timed corrections and rewards), this was a complete non-issue.
04-02-2014 09:33 AM
onyx'girl
Quote:
Originally Posted by CJthePuppy View Post
Thank you. However in my opinion I don't think punishment is the answer to any problem. My parents never had to hit me because I learned to listen. I don't think a dog should be pronged. But thank you for the advice! We all have different ways of doing things.


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Quote:
Originally Posted by boomer11
Click and treat sounds good in theory but honestly in those situations the dog doesn't want a treat. There are competing motivators and the dog wants that more than a treat.

In my opinion I'd teach the dog to sit. If he breaks his sit you punish him (prong). Start in the house. He doesn't get to break his sit without your permission. Then when you see another dog tell him to sit. If he breaks the sit punish him. Dog will learn he needs to sit. Dog will sit while another dog walks by. Dog realizes hey this isn't a big deal. That dog is no threat. Dog learns joggers aren't a big deal. Dog learns if I break my sit and lunge it's gonna hurt. Just my opinion. Or you can pull out a treat and beg the dog to listen.....

Btw if your dog isn't confident enough and is reactive to strange dogs and joggers then I don't think that's a good temperament for a therapy dog. I wouldn't try to fit a square peg into a round hole.
I agree with boomer11(bolded part too). I'd put the dog in a sit when the reactivity begins, if the dog breaks the sit, correction happens...that way the correction is not from reacting but from breaking the sit. It is a good way to redirect the reactivity and put the dog into obedience mode. You aren't hitting your dog, but are communicating that the dog must obey you. LAT and BAT also work great, but you need to be proactive and consistent. And it takes time to train the dog out of the reactivity. When my female Onyx went thru this, a treat was the last thing on her mind. But I didn't correct her for her reactive behavior as it ramped her up more. I did LAT. If I had to do this over, I'd do as Boomer suggested.
04-02-2014 09:23 AM
Bridget Yeah, some dogs just don't like other dogs. He might get better and good for you that you are taking steps to get him trained up. Or you may always have to try to keep him away from dogs, especially dogs he doesn't know well. Not a perfect scenario, but it is workable.
04-02-2014 08:53 AM
sehrgutcsg It's not a surprise that "Lisa," asks ALL the important questions before giving out important advice and information.

Applaud !

Sounds to me like a control issue>? Who's the boss here>?

Example: and; I am not a pro: Bella turned 3 1/2 months today. (12/25) She's doing well overall. I started walking her at daybreak and she is barking and very alert. A man smoking and walking in our direction, (barks), no correction. A family with luggage waiting for a cab and a 6 year old boy, barks, (correction). Bella, "that boy is a good boy" and "you need not be concerned."

I have not allowed other dog owner's animals near my dog during this crucial stage of training. I asked for a neighbor to back off, the damage done in three seconds can set you back six months. Treat training going well, Jack Russell, Nelson demonstrating right in the middle and both are receiving treats. She's not ready for children yet. She needs more time. I am in control of every situation, no matter if my wife, child or anybody else's concern's, they are all invalid.

Listen to Selzer. Lisa know's the path you walk on, her approach, and description is so spot on you should pay her !!
04-02-2014 08:46 AM
Blanketback When pups get free-for-all play with dogs at daycares and dog parks, sometimes when they're leashed and they see another dog, they turn into wild things, wanting to get right to the dog in view. I know my own dog is like that, and it's been a challenge to teach him manners on leash around dogs in the distance. You do need to have some good OB to help with this.

The biting and pulling off other dogs is something different. Your dog might not be the type to enjoy other dogs. My last darling GSD was like that, and he was also a Therapy Dog. So it's not impossible to realize your dreams with him, if he ends up with the right temperament towards people in general. But you might want to start teaching him to ignore other dogs and limit his access to them. He'll need to ignore them IRL when he's a TD - not just to pass the test, but also encountering other animals while working. We saw cats and birds too, not just dogs, on our visits. Good luck!
04-02-2014 08:20 AM
Athena'sMom Athena just turned 11 months and has started to bark at all dogs on walks. I try to take her to a nature trail where I know a lot of dogs are going to be. I place her in down/stay when I see a dog and in a calm voice say it's okay/friend and when she does not bark I praise like crazy. We did this all saturday and by the end I could walk on and just say it's okay and she just ignored. It is not an easy fix because she still barks but consistency is key. They are testing their boundaries. Just stay calm if you get agitated they will feed off your negativity and view the other dog as more of a threat and react. I try to stay confident and neutral. Take a no big deal attitude towards other dogs. It will take time to totally solve the problem entirely if at all. It is more of a managed thing and keep walking and socializing from a far build up their tolerance for other animals.
I signed Athena up for 4h with my son to get more safe exposure to new situations. Continuous training is a must and a calm, confident attitude. Good luck!
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