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Topic Review (Newest First)
04-07-2014 09:35 PM
Chip18 Sorry I forgot to post this:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hXeSvoeorEI

And the leash has to be loose when this happens if the leash is tight you have no chance of getting this under control!
04-01-2014 02:03 PM
Jakesworld Thanks for adding . I remember a thread about walking not being exercise. Is it still there? Did you read it? I never did, I was going too. Maybe I'll look it up. Anyway, there was one walk we went on that he was totally exhausted from, but it was loaded with mental stuff. I thought before our regular walks we 'd go long lead and off leash (I can gate off part of my pasture) and do some play and let him sniff and run. He sniffs and runs in the back, but he's already so familiar with those smells I imagine it's boring back there for him. Ya, I think some of these shorter walks (1 mile, or maybe under alittle) are just enough to wake him up.

Regreeting, also that in itself may be the problem. I remember some ducks we had a couple years ago. My daughter would hold them for a while. When that duck returned to the flock, all **** broke loose, in each others faces with all the noise. I just figured they were talkin to each other about their abduction experience.
04-01-2014 11:13 AM
jocoyn I had an idea also this morning - a play on Sarah's Sita actually.

I have been walking 6 miles a day in 2 mile increments and bring Beau along. I am trying to push it all to the front of the day with the summer coming on. Even though I throw balls before, I did an extra mile today to get used to it and Beau was about to climb out of his skin on the extra mile. Came back and threw balls just to get it out of him.

This dog can trot for HOURS at a steady pace but walking is not his normal gait and I only see him walking when he is on lead with me. It is a trotting breed. I wonder if that could be contributing to antsy-ness.

This is to add to, not take away from, the other comments.
04-01-2014 08:48 AM
JeanKBBMMMAAN I have found the re-greeting after "special time" alone can be difficult in a pack of dogs. When I take a dog out and do something special - they go to work, they go to the store, whatever, when they come back they may try to act like the big shot, and bully, or the other dogs may try to knock them down a peg no matter what. It's like the pieces of a puzzle being broken apart and trying to get back together - but something different has happened, and they aren't sure it's going to be the same anymore. My job is to reassure them, by controlling this to the degree it needs to be controlled, that yes, everyone is still the same as before and no one has just become the lord of the manor.
03-31-2014 07:15 PM
Jakesworld Hey guys, thank you. Really. Crate it is, til he calms down, then alittle training/focus session before releasing him with the other dogs. Hopefully by combining these training techniques it will do the trick and get this behavior nipped in the bud. I'll work on that fence fighting thing too.
03-31-2014 06:17 PM
Chip18
Quote:
Originally Posted by JakodaCD OA View Post
well this won't make me popular with the already posted, but here goes.

I wouldn't put up with this poop He LIVES with these dogs, they aren't strangers, if he gets along fine with them otherwise, there's no reason for him to be a butt head after a walk.

I agree with getting him to calm down before you re enter the house, but I've also done what others here have suggested not to, and mine is czech/ddr with High ENERGY, .. She used to come in the house after being somewhere with me, start a "in your face barking fest" with the other dogs, no attacking, but trying to get a reaction out of them...Prong collar on leash, correction, doesn't do it anymore

I don't baby my dogs, I don't have dogs who's feelings get hurt when they get a correction, they get one, they are over it, they move on. I might add I don't 'beat' my dogs either))
You get no disagreement from me! But the OP said her dog did not respect them!

Building that relationship to me would be step one while keeping the other dogs safe.
03-31-2014 06:12 PM
Chip18
Quote:
Originally Posted by David Taggart View Post
I just wanted to add: pay attention to that fence-fighting, fence-fighting may have hard consequences. Like unfinished business, it stays in your dog's head for a long time after. He might start anticipating it, and, as in any other unfinished business someone has to fall victim. Like in domestic violence, the husband beats his wife because he cannot smash the nose of his boss. Adrenaline rush doesn't appear without testosterone playing crazy. Your dog will pass his adolescence one day, and his hormones will come into balance at three years of age, but habits will remain. There are ways to train him walking by that fence and looking only at you.
No disagreement here!
03-31-2014 06:04 PM
David Taggart I just wanted to add: pay attention to that fence-fighting, fence-fighting may have hard consequences. Like unfinished business, it stays in your dog's head for a long time after. He might start anticipating it, and, as in any other unfinished business someone has to fall victim. Like in domestic violence, the husband beats his wife because he cannot smash the nose of his boss. Adrenaline rush doesn't appear without testosterone playing crazy. Your dog will pass his adolescence one day, and his hormones will come into balance at three years of age, but habits will remain. There are ways to train him walking by that fence and looking only at you.
03-31-2014 05:53 PM
Sarah'sSita My Pele would also be ramped up after a walk when he was a youngster. The prong made it worse. I never gave him the opportunity to be a butt head with the other dog at that age. We'd finish the walk and play or positive OB, then containment in a crate for a short time. He learned self-control quickly and the other dog did not get conditioned to prepare for butthead behavior. I do schutzhund, and you bet they are ramped up out of their minds after bitework, the cool off walk and placement in crate is a must. Besides when they are that ramped up it is very difficult for a young dog to learn much. I realized too that I brought my OWN apprehension and stress initially when I brought them together initially (I kept them separate for too long when I got Pele as a puppy-thats another story). Crating Pele helped ME! Manners training with the other dogs occurs when they aren't in the red-zone. I have had situations where small fights have occurred but never after a walk. I watch the dogs carefully to make sure nothing is brewing and nip it in the bud real quick. I have learned to be VERY consistent with these dogs. Fortunately both have enough OB training and now at 4 and 9 years of age much of this behavior is gone or indeed rare. The react much better to my pissed voice than pinches prongs and I am physically able to separate them. Change your routine so you aren't practicing useless commands (I disagree with making him hold a long down at that age and mind set - why fight a dog that loves to fight? This may only yield conflict with you )and breaking up fights and you will see a change in the youngsters self-control.
03-31-2014 05:46 PM
Jakesworld Hey Diane, Thanks. At least I know I'm not the only one out there who's dog can be a butt head with this behavior. I'm gonna try a down stay when we come in the house until he calms down. With leash on. And try to expend some of that energy. He's limping again on his other leg now so obviously he's not done with the pano. But I think I will take him out on a long lead and let him run around the property. I have to go to work soon so we can't go on that really long walk in the woods like I'd like too, but he is a little sore today anyway. I think I might just have to try a combination of training and exercise, while I try to figure out the trigger for his bad behavior . Still, if anyone can think of anything that may help or cause these reactions, please let me know. Thanks again.

Teresa
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