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Topic Review (Newest First)
03-28-2014 05:42 AM
Jmoore728
Quote:
Originally Posted by onyx'girl View Post
You should plant a seed in Greyson's teachers ear about a little presentation on children and dogs/how to approach, etc. Rocketdog(username here) does this and I think it is so important for that age group to learn(and then they can take handouts home to the parents to sign after the parents have read it) PM Rocketdog and ask if she can share the program she uses.
Sounds like a great idea. I will shoot her a PM. Thank you
03-27-2014 09:26 AM
onyx'girl
Quote:
I usually walk Bane to my 4 year olds school daily when picking Greyson up....We stand in line outside with all the parents waiting for the Pre-K class to come out. He handles all the kids great. But, I always keep a close eye on him... Monday, Bane was laying down while we were waiting. When the kids got released, one of Greyson's classmates came running up to Bane and kneeled down and started petting him. He did wonderful. Just layed there and let her pet him....It surprised me, because I wasn't expecting something like that to happen...After the fact, I was proud of him...Some of the parents will steer away when they are coming towards us....Some people see a GSD and think the worst. I've started taking him when he was around 12-16 weeks old....
You should plant a seed in Greyson's teachers ear about a little presentation on children and dogs/how to approach, etc. Rocketdog(username here) does this and I think it is so important for that age group to learn(and then they can take handouts home to the parents to sign after the parents have read it) PM Rocketdog and ask if she can share the program she uses.
03-27-2014 08:25 AM
Jmoore728
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChunksDad View Post
This is a great thread, I have had experience with all three of my shepherds that have this kind of mouthing behavior... (Maybe not to the same extent, but...)
My first used to chase our son (then 14 years old) and herd him while she was young... He hated it and would discipline her when she nipped him in the butt. We laughed and she outgrew this habit.
The second, a 5 y/o female that we have now is mouthy during play at home but never at training. She is a SCH wash out due to trainer conflict and operator error. She had a litter and was fixed and just doesn't want to work anymore.. So she is loved at home and is the current reigning queen. (Next to my wife.)
Her pup was mouthy at home with his litter mates and with me since birth and has been bite training for almost 1 year. He will be going for his bh some time this summer. He never bites me on the field unless it is by accident. ie: lunging for the ball on a rope and hits my fingers instead of all of the ball.
At home it is all different, he gets to play rough with me and often gently grabs my arm to take me some where,, out of bed so he can relieve himself, out of my chair to play with him or just to say hello often to instigate play.. These are usually gentle but when it gets out of hand and he treats me like when he is playing with his mother he gets corrected.

You mentioned that Bane is only 6 months old and like "puberty" right now.. realistically his puberty phase won't hit until he is 1.3 to 1.5 y/o.. He will be a very powerful dog with strong drives at that stage, his bite won't be so innocent then, really.. Best advice I can give now is to correct it before you are bitten in play and it really causes some damage.

When Chunk comes off the field after bite work he has always won a sleeve, ball prey etc. he is never empty mouthed at the end and he pridefully prances to his crate or car. If Bane doesn't get to win his prize and walk off the field engaged with his prize you should take the edge off his energy by making him chase the ball or some other method of release. Tugging IMHO seems to power up not expend that energy.

The down side to bitework is that you are completely liable for any tooth contact that causes a skin break, pressure bruise or fearful response. I know you said that he is gentle with others but when he really hits his mature stride you will not want him doing this to you or anybody else.. Especially now if this is Bane testing you.. Erring on the side of caution will allow you to have a great family, neighborhood dog (which all of our's are or have been) and your own personal play boundries at home. I've seen enough of my three dogs behaviors to trust the two current GSD's in a crowd of kids and strangers.
I have to run to work but will continue this on later in the day..

Phil
One good thing so far, he doesn't ever mouth the boys. He did when we first brought him home, but we corrected this right off. I usually walk Bane to my 4 year olds school daily when picking Greyson up....We stand in line outside with all the parents waiting for the Pre-K class to come out. He handles all the kids great. But, I always keep a close eye on him... Monday, Bane was laying down while we were waiting. When the kids got released, one of Greyson's classmates came running up to Bane and kneeled down and started petting him. He did wonderful. Just layed there and let her pet him....It surprised me, because I wasn't expecting something like that to happen...After the fact, I was proud of him...Some of the parents will steer away when they are coming towards us....Some people see a GSD and think the worst. I've started taking him when he was around 12-16 weeks old....

I'm not for sure it he is testing me or just doing what I've allowed him to do (bad habit). He likes going after me and my wife's ankles at times. He rarely does it to me anymore. But never the boys. Ankle thing is getting better. I finally have the wife being more firm when he does this to her. I have her convinced that one good correction is better that 100 non effective corrections. We are atill fair to him.

I will keep laying the foundation for obedience, but I'm not going to get real serious until he is around a year old or so. I'm going to scale it back a little. I'm going to focus on letting him be a puppy and give him the chance to make the right decisions on his own. I will get more formal once he gets a little older. I will still encourage house manners and good behavior though.
03-27-2014 08:05 AM
Jmoore728
Quote:
Originally Posted by onyx'girl View Post
My response was to GSDluver4life, sorry, I should have quoted her post in my response.
I caught on after the fact...haha...Thanks for all the advice!
03-26-2014 08:40 PM
GSDluver4lyfe
Quote:
Originally Posted by onyx'girl View Post
I wouldn't 'blame the dog' or you! It is the difference in dog and the methods used in training. Some dogs do better with food, others with toys. I try to mix up my sessions with both, and usually carry a couple different toys on me during a training session. Some dogs can't handle too much stimulation, they need quiet praise and low value rewarding. Others need to be ramped up. It is all about the dog in front of you....
even during a session, changing things is necessary depending on what you are working on.
Now, I completely agree! Sometimes you get so focused on what you are "supposed to do" like all the top notch trainers and wanting a dog trained just like that and not realize what works for the individual dog in front of you. Like I stated in a previous post, my initial reaction with Mace was to build his drive and let everything else fade to the background. But that level of drive needed to use a toy efficiently overloaded him. It puts him in a state that *I* don't like, someone else however may desire that effect.
03-26-2014 06:31 PM
ChunksDad
Great Thread V2

Work lasted less time than I thought it would so to finish my thoughts..
Chunk is about to be used as a guard dog in an environment under my control. We have had numerous break ins at my church and the county sheriff is at least 45 mins (or maybe more) away. A friend and I will be using him to clear out the building after the alarm goes off. We have begun to teach him how to clear out a room while on a long line. Each Sunday nite 30 mins or so before the evening service starts we take him from room to room. (There are other exercises in this process but for conversation's sake I'll omit them.)
When we are done, Chunk gets to play with the kids who come to the service with their parents. He is really gentle, waiting for them to give him or throw the ball. One little lady tells him to sit or lie down and he does it willingly all in the game. No mouthing, jumping or rough stuff and always obedient to my commands when need be. I'd call him a church mouse but if I needed to flip the proverbial switch to put him in protect mode the kids would have to be removed from the environment.
IMHO it's possible to have a dog that mouths in play with owners but it needs to be off the field. Habits can leak off the work field if you let them..

Good Luck, I know Bane will turn out to be a great dog. He is certainly a good looking one..

Phil
03-26-2014 05:26 PM
ChunksDad
Great Thread

This is a great thread, I have had experience with all three of my shepherds that have this kind of mouthing behavior... (Maybe not to the same extent, but...)
My first used to chase our son (then 14 years old) and herd him while she was young... He hated it and would discipline her when she nipped him in the butt. We laughed and she outgrew this habit.
The second, a 5 y/o female that we have now is mouthy during play at home but never at training. She is a SCH wash out due to trainer conflict and operator error. She had a litter and was fixed and just doesn't want to work anymore.. So she is loved at home and is the current reigning queen. (Next to my wife.)
Her pup was mouthy at home with his litter mates and with me since birth and has been bite training for almost 1 year. He will be going for his bh some time this summer. He never bites me on the field unless it is by accident. ie: lunging for the ball on a rope and hits my fingers instead of all of the ball.
At home it is all different, he gets to play rough with me and often gently grabs my arm to take me some where,, out of bed so he can relieve himself, out of my chair to play with him or just to say hello often to instigate play.. These are usually gentle but when it gets out of hand and he treats me like when he is playing with his mother he gets corrected.

You mentioned that Bane is only 6 months old and like "puberty" right now.. realistically his puberty phase won't hit until he is 1.3 to 1.5 y/o.. He will be a very powerful dog with strong drives at that stage, his bite won't be so innocent then, really.. Best advice I can give now is to correct it before you are bitten in play and it really causes some damage.

When Chunk comes off the field after bite work he has always won a sleeve, ball prey etc. he is never empty mouthed at the end and he pridefully prances to his crate or car. If Bane doesn't get to win his prize and walk off the field engaged with his prize you should take the edge off his energy by making him chase the ball or some other method of release. Tugging IMHO seems to power up not expend that energy.

The down side to bitework is that you are completely liable for any tooth contact that causes a skin break, pressure bruise or fearful response. I know you said that he is gentle with others but when he really hits his mature stride you will not want him doing this to you or anybody else.. Especially now if this is Bane testing you.. Erring on the side of caution will allow you to have a great family, neighborhood dog (which all of our's are or have been) and your own personal play boundries at home. I've seen enough of my three dogs behaviors to trust the two current GSD's in a crowd of kids and strangers.
I have to run to work but will continue this on later in the day..

Phil
03-26-2014 09:50 AM
onyx'girl My response was to GSDluver4life, sorry, I should have quoted her post in my response.
03-26-2014 07:48 AM
Jmoore728
Quote:
Originally Posted by onyx'girl View Post
I wouldn't 'blame the dog' or you! It is the difference in dog and the methods used in training. Some dogs do better with food, others with toys. I try to mix up my sessions with both, and usually carry a couple different toys on me during a training session. Some dogs can't handle too much stimulation, they need quiet praise and low value rewarding. Others need to be ramped up. It is all about the dog in front of you....
even during a session, changing things is necessary depending on what you are working on.

I'm not blaming the dog at all...He has made me as a new handler look good. I knew this stage was coming, just not for sure how to properly deal with it. His energy is multiplying by the day, I'll up his mental and physical stimulation . One good thing. He doesn't chew up anything in the house...I'll keep posting videos of training sessions we do at home so I can have you guys and ladies review them,,,,Obedience I'm comfortable with....Bite work I'm afraid of failing and I don't want Bane to fail. I just need him to keep that full grip and hang on longer. Club will continue working him on the tugs and bite wedges. He is still a pup....I should know how his grip will be by 12-16 months.
03-26-2014 12:34 AM
Jmoore728
Quote:
Originally Posted by onyx'girl View Post
I really like this blog, she is spot on everytime she writes something and most days when I read her blog, it is perfect timing in what I'm working on with my dog.

The Naughty Dogge Blog | Naughty Dogge - Monique Anstee

https://www.facebook.com/monique.anstee

Thanks for the link....I've read through at least half of them. Good stuff....
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