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Thread: Why dogs wash out? Causes, and solutions. Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
03-19-2014 04:09 PM
Jmoore728
Quote:
Originally Posted by Smithie86 View Post
Both yes to Gator and Lee.

Most trainers/handlers want a dog that fits within what they are looking for. If it does not fit their "box", the dog goes. I have seen an increase of this over the last few years, from a local club level to higher levels.
No matter what happens, I'll adjust as needed to find something that fits Banes "box" if SchH turns out not being his thing. As of right now, he is showing great potential. Until he gets older and some pressure is put on him, I won't know. He will still be a part of the family..

We have plans to get a female later down the road. Not until Bane is at a stage where he is more obedient.
03-19-2014 03:11 PM
Smithie86 Both yes to Gator and Lee.

Most trainers/handlers want a dog that fits within what they are looking for. If it does not fit their "box", the dog goes. I have seen an increase of this over the last few years, from a local club level to higher levels.
03-19-2014 01:47 PM
Jmoore728
Quote:
Originally Posted by GatorDog View Post
I also think that it depends on what the handler expects to do with the dog, not always just the dog themselves. Everyone in a club isn't always training for Nationals. Its only a washout if you can't possibly figure out how to make it work at any level or aren't willing to work at that level.

How is Carma doing? I think I've watched all the videos a million times. Awesome dog
03-19-2014 01:47 PM
Jmoore728 Great explanations....I'm taking it easy with Bane and trying to keep it fun..I'll just take it one day at a time,,,If he ends up not being able to do the work in the long run, I'm okay with that...I will try to pursue whatever he shows the most interest in.....
03-19-2014 10:58 AM
Merciel Not IPO specific, but here are some reasons that I have seen dogs wash out of other sports:

-- Dog physically can't do it. Sometimes this is due to career-ending or -hobbling injury. Sometimes the dog matures with unexpected weaknesses (bad hips, wonky structure, etc.). Sometimes there's nothing wrong with the way that the dog is built, but it uses its body in weird ways. I have an acquaintance who recently retired an agility dog because while there was nothing that could be picked up as "wrong" in the dog's X-rays or physical evaluations, her dog just had a really weird way of moving and using his body that caused him to injure himsef routinely on course. She couldn't train it out and the dog kept doing it, so she had to retire the dog for his own safety.

-- Dog mentally can't do it. Sometimes the dog doesn't have a lot of working drive (my Crookytail fits into this box). Sometimes the dog is too anxious or spooky to handle unfamiliar environments or the general pressures of the competition environment (Pongu is a gold star winner here). Sometimes the dog can't handle the specific pressures of protection work. Some of this can be compensated for with training and exposure. Some of it can't.

-- Dog and handler just aren't a good fit. The dog might be just fine with a different training/handling approach, or with a handler who has a different personality (energetic vs. calm, loud vs. quiet, encouraging and supportive vs. driven and demanding, you get the idea). Whether it's a mismatch of personalities or a poor fit for the handler's training style or both, this is another reason that teams fail. The dog and handler may both go on to be very successful with different partners.

-- Human has unreasonable expectations, pins them on the dog, blames the dog for failure when they don't achieve those goals. I hate seeing these teams and I'm happy to say I don't see them very often, but they're definitely out there. There is a subset of dog sports people that is not very good, will probably never be very good, and puts all the blame for that on the wrong end of the leash. I feel bad for their dogs and I'd bet a dollar their dogs are pretty happy to get "washed out" of those teams.
03-19-2014 10:27 AM
Baillif
Quote:
Originally Posted by mycobraracr View Post
I have washed out a dog. Here is why. She was great pet dog. Loves people and other animals and is an all around loving girl. She was doing just fine with the foundational work. Showed good drive and interest, just was lacking some work ethic in obedience. When she felt like doing it, she did okay but if she didn't then it wasn't going to happen. She was never going to be a "top" sport dog, but should have been able to play at the club level. That was just fine with me until we started adding a little pressure into the bite work. Then she started to fall apart. It was making her start to show some neurotic behaviors as well as other things and I just wasn't liking what I was seeing. She obviously isn't cut out for bite work, and rather than try and make her something she's not I decided to pull her from sport. My Sister and Bro-inlaw were looking for a GSD as a pet, so she lives with them now as nothing more than I spoiled pet. The way I look at it, is that we were just not a match.
Right, and this is a good example of a dog that washed out from something that just cant be fixed. It happens. The dog was properly rehomed and can live out life as a great pet. My mentor has 7 dogs and only 2 compete and actively train. The rest are washouts that act as demo dogs or stable socialization dogs at the kennel. If they dont work out for the work find em a job they are good at.
03-19-2014 09:57 AM
onyx'girl Don't forget injury....sadly many dogs have to retire(wash) due to injury, probably more dissapointing than washing a dog due to temperament.
03-19-2014 09:54 AM
mycobraracr I have washed out a dog. Here is why. She was great pet dog. Loves people and other animals and is an all around loving girl. She was doing just fine with the foundational work. Showed good drive and interest, just was lacking some work ethic in obedience. When she felt like doing it, she did okay but if she didn't then it wasn't going to happen. She was never going to be a "top" sport dog, but should have been able to play at the club level. That was just fine with me until we started adding a little pressure into the bite work. Then she started to fall apart. It was making her start to show some neurotic behaviors as well as other things and I just wasn't liking what I was seeing. She obviously isn't cut out for bite work, and rather than try and make her something she's not I decided to pull her from sport. My Sister and Bro-inlaw were looking for a GSD as a pet, so she lives with them now as nothing more than I spoiled pet. The way I look at it, is that we were just not a match.
03-19-2014 09:31 AM
robk I agree with both Gatordog and Wolfstraum. It is not always the dog. We humans have a great deal to do with what our dogs accomplish. Dogs always do not fit our time tables. For example, I could have washed my own dog out any number of times between 10 months and 2 years because there were times I just was not seeing what I wanted to see. If I was on some specific time table I may have done just that. Today at almost 3 he is a different dog. Over the last 6 months he really has matured and his intensity has gone through the roof. He is also so much more trainable. Things are just clicking for him that were not clicking a year ago. His mind is finally at a good place and we are making great progress. It would have been so easy to give up on him or pass him off to someone else before he had a chance to blossom. I am now excited about the prospects of not just titling him but trialling him competitively for years to come.
03-19-2014 09:27 AM
Baillif Right a lot of those possessive dogs would have been great had the handler just rewarded with possession and made rules for the return later. When you give them chances to possess they return items for play far more willingly.

People so often forget the point of reward games is to reward the dog. How that occurs is largely up to dog preference. But that is off topic.
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