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Thread: should i return my rescue? Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
03-18-2014 04:53 PM
RubyTuesday
Quote:
It might be helpful for OP to discuss the situation with the rescue even if returning is not an option. If they think everything is just hunky-dory, then they can't help. Also they will probably want to know that a dog they listed as good with kids just bit one. It might help them re-evaluate what they tell potential adopters about handling a new dog.
Excellent idea. Note too, as others have stated, this dog must be managed diligently & with the utmost caution. She's also at that age where the adult temperament & attitudes are really coming out. Train thoroughly & be very aware of all that she 'says' & does. You need to be certain that her 'bad' behavior isn't escalating. For you sake, for her sake & for everyone's sake, do not assume that she won't attack again. From what you described this was nothing like a simple defensive bite or fear reaction. Love her, love her deeply, but do so with both eyes open & all senses on full alert.
03-18-2014 01:56 PM
blackshep
Quote:
Originally Posted by JakodaCD OA View Post
I can't tell you what to do obviously

I will say, a dog that takes off across the street to nail a kid, is a dog that needs some serious management.

I hope you can find a good trainer/behaviorist and be better prepared/vigilant in the future
I agree. The dog caught you by surprise this time, but now you know. So now you need to make sure you're prepared and in control in the future.

Perhaps having the dog muzzled as an extra precaution when out of doors would be a good idea, until you figure out what happened and work your dog through it with a trainer.

Good for you for being so upfront with the parent and making sure the child was ok. I'm glad they were reasonable about it, but you must make sure it never happens again.
03-18-2014 01:11 PM
Blanketback
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kaimeju View Post
It might be helpful for OP to discuss the situation with the rescue even if returning is not an option. If they think everything is just hunky-dory, then they can't help. Also they will probably want to know that a dog they listed as good with kids just bit one. It might help them re-evaluate what they tell potential adopters about handling a new dog.
This is a great suggestion! This would go a long way in helping both the dogs and the new owners. It's not fair when someone adopts a dog and it turns out to be something beyond their scope of management. I know someone whose favorite breed is rottie, and she brought one home from the shelter under the belief that it was good with children - until it bit her child and she had to return him. Lose/lose for everyone, when you consider that now the dog is doomed, the child is hurt, and the person in the middle is still filled with guilt and anger over this easily preventable situation, years later.
03-18-2014 12:42 PM
Kaimeju
Quote:
Originally Posted by RubyTuesday View Post
This! I don't think you can make a decision about this until you really, REALLLLY understand what that was all about. That behavior is deeply troubling.
No kidding. I hope they are able to figure it out. If unable to figure it out, then you have to assume it's a dog that just makes really bad decisions when they are over-aroused and keep the arousal level down, work on impulse control, have the right tools for physical control and management.

Since it has only been a few months, training could really help if OP is willing to put in the time and find good people to work with. I didn't understand the depth of my rescue's problems at two months, and the way I handled her back then I think is totally crazy now. I can see her getting worked up a mile away, but it took a long time to be able to read her.

It might be helpful for OP to discuss the situation with the rescue even if returning is not an option. If they think everything is just hunky-dory, then they can't help. Also they will probably want to know that a dog they listed as good with kids just bit one. It might help them re-evaluate what they tell potential adopters about handling a new dog.
03-17-2014 09:22 PM
RubyTuesday
Quote:
I will say, a dog that takes off across the street to nail a kid, is a dog that needs some serious management.
This! I don't think you can make a decision about this until you really, REALLLLY understand what that was all about. That behavior is deeply troubling.
03-17-2014 05:35 PM
JakodaCD OA I can't tell you what to do obviously

I will say, a dog that takes off across the street to nail a kid, is a dog that needs some serious management.

I hope you can find a good trainer/behaviorist and be better prepared/vigilant in the future
03-17-2014 11:22 AM
Gwenhwyfair I agree with you this sounds like a case that can be worked with.

But...what is a bit more of a warning flag is the fact the dog ran across the street to bite the child.

So that's not biting out of fear IMO, because the dog had the option of flight and didn't take it.

So I think it would be helpful to understand what would motivate the dog to advance on the child and bite...could be prey drive OR some form aggression?

Again agree this is a case where it's worthwhile to try and fix this but .... with a great deal of caution and an experienced GSD trainer.



Quote:
Originally Posted by selzer View Post
One bite in the hand and stopping, is a LOT different than bites in the leg, arm and torso (back), and not stopping until the guy came in and pulled the dog off.

Also a child playing with the grandchildren is a lot different than a dog hearing a large noise and running up to a stranger and giving a single bite. The second situation is not good. But that child walked away, possibly with minimal damage. The first child had bites with all four canines engaged, and not just to extremities.

These are two different situations totally.

Furthermore. The first people had the dog for two years, and the dog has a history of trouble with them, and trouble before it came to them.

The second dog has been in the home for a few months. It should be settled by now, but it seems like a large noise unsettled it. The dog may not have been expected to have the same amount of confidence in its owner, and still responded better in this situation than the first dog.

It was bad, but there are different levels of bad. Kids allowed into your home, attacked by a dog is really bad.

It is comparing apples to oranges really.
03-17-2014 10:56 AM
Blanketback OP, my 1st GSD would have done the same thing. He didn't like children, and he did like to air snap. The combination of his sharp teeth and a child's delicate skin would have eventually lead to this if he'd had the freedom to run around with kids. The question is: how often is this going to happen? If you can't manage the dog so that the answer is "never" then you should look at rehoming. It's not fair to the kids - and if the dog is going to do this once, then it's going to do it again. I had no problem at all with my GSD, since making the commitment to guarantee that no kids were ever near my dog was a simple fit for my lifestyle. Maybe you know someone who's living my kind of life and can do it? Or maybe you're already there, and just have to be more careful. Good luck, and I'm very glad that the girl is ok!
03-17-2014 09:45 AM
Bridget I don't think it was protectiveness since the child was across the street. I think you will not have both dogs on leash at the same time anymore (and carry something!) I did that once and got drug down the driveway on my face when my two saw another dog!
03-16-2014 12:43 AM
Colie CVT None of my dogs are particularly fond of children. One has patience for ages and will go wide around them. One is curious and uncertain since he's an idiot puppy. The other tends to be okay with them if they are being quiet and still, but if they are flailing or making sounds, she tends to sound off. I know this dog has lived in homes with children and been fine. However, I have a feeling she never truly enjoyed having to deal with the children, and as a result I am very careful with her interactions with them. Her recall is the best out of all of my dogs. Not only will she come when I call, but when someone else calls her or calls their dog to them.

I agree with others that this could be worked with, and could potentially be turned about with training and careful planning/supervision. Even with a dog who is extremely trustworthy around people, kids, other animals, the potential of something happening is always there. Just because they are okay with your children or family they recognize does not mean it translates to everyone. Especially since kids can be a touch annoying at times to dogs when they're out in backyards (hence a reason the aussie with us cannot be trusted around kids at all - they used to torture him from the other side of the fence daily) and often make strange sounds and movements.

However, you have to ask yourself if you want to put in the time or if you feel that this incident will forever change your perception of the dog. It is not a good thing for an antagonistic relationship being between you and your dog. Even if you do care about them and want to do right by them, it is not always the right way by keeping them with you.

We have a foster currently who nipped a child on the rear when it was running around. She had been with her breeder up until 5 or so months (kept in a pen with her mother) so she was not really socialized with people that much. The people who we got her from were in a touch over their heads. They had two labs, a rescued boxer thing and her littermate when they got her (I believe the original female they had died in some manner, and they received this girl). They simply don't have the time to work with all their dogs and she had bonded with her brother more than them. As of now, my roommate (who is the dog trainer) is the one who she adores. She doesn't have much trouble with me, however her insecurities about the world manifest as barking/charging scary things. She has done this toward me, but as soon as she hears my voice, she knows who I am and is fine. Today when out hiking with a group of people, even if she had seen them or been around them, she would pick some to bark and charge at, not necessarily nipping but that is the next progression. It will take time and training to help her work her way through it (as well as confidence building), but it is going to be a labor of time and love.

I wish you luck in whatever you choose to do. Given it is an isolated incident with a single bite, I would personally be more careful about how she is handled when outside and seek the guidance of a trainer who can truly evaluate her and help you. Without being there and seeing what actually happened, the motive/reason behind the bite is guess work. People often want to place the blame on anything but the dog, find some way to justify it, but truthfully it is only speculation and some days it is on the dog. -shrug- Important thing now is to be sure it does not happen again for the safety of all those around, including the dog.
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