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Topic Review (Newest First)
02-26-2014 09:41 AM
Blanketback I'd use the words that come naturally to you. It will be so much easier to teach your puppy if you're consistent with them. It doesn't matter in the grand scheme of things which words mean what to others, lol, just you.

I use 'stay' to keep my dogs in position too, and then a release word. I use 'stay here' to keep them in the yard with with if the gate's open, and 'wait' before going out the door. But they always have to have a release word ('okay') before they can change what their doing.
02-26-2014 07:53 AM
llombardo I use stay when they are not to move and I'm going back to them to release them. Wait is more temporary and they are released without me going back to them. Wait us good for feeding, the car, or crating.
02-26-2014 06:44 AM
Sp00ks Thank you everyone, I think the "wait" command will work. By default I don't want him bolting out in the yard when there is an opening. Eventually we will get there. He is already pretty good and getting better.

My wife and myself as well, have used "stay" our entire lives. My wife is having a hard time breaking herself of that habit. I've caught myself doing it once in awhile as well.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Curtis View Post
A light bulb came on in my head today about this as we were training in the backyard. I put him in a "sit" and realized that he wasn't going to move until I released him. So I sprinted away from him without giving "stay", and he just waited for the next command.

Now I'm not sure when to use stay lol.
Curtis, every "sit" or "down" or even "climb" is a stay command without actually saying "stay". Then a release command, we use "free". Let's face it, free isn't used very often in normal conversation these days "Come" is a come/sit. The concept is that "stay" is not needed. So far we have not taught stay.
02-25-2014 10:55 PM
selzer Because I do Rally Obedience, I use the STAY command after the SIT or the WAIT command, depending if I am going to return to the dog, or call the dog to me.

This is because in Rally, there are a ton of sits or downs. Once the dogs elbows hit the earth, you can move on, At that point, I don't always say HEEL, but sometimes I do. Usually I teach them to SIT when I stop, and then to move with me when I go, unless I deliberately tell them WAIT or STAY. At that point the butt is glued to the ground until I give the OK.

In class or at a trial STAY means don't move, whether it is a SIT, STAND, or DOWN. At home, in the kennels, STAY means, Stay In the kennel, and doesn't mean do not move a muscle. I really don't know how my dog understands the difference between a kennel STAY and a trial STAY. But they do.

Maybe the thing to do is to ask your trainer how they would train the dog to stay in say, the living room. Stay in the yard will probably get you the Evil Eye if you ask a trainer that. But basically, a command where the dog can move about, but stay in one area.
02-25-2014 10:39 PM
David Taggart You can avoid giving any command, if you don't call him from the other side of the gate - it means he has to remain there.
02-25-2014 10:11 PM
Charlie W For my dogs "stay" has always meant "stay there, where I put you, until I return to you and release you or give another command".

"wait" means wait there until I give you another command, which might come from a distance i.e I might call the dog to me, get them to sit / down or stand, or release them altogether.

The dogs learn the difference.. If I want to go out of the gate without the dogs, I'll say "wait", at which point they will stop, one I'm through I'll release them with a "go on then" (my standard command for do what you want). If I want them to come through the gate I'll say "sit", then call them through once I'm through..
02-25-2014 09:55 PM
Curtis
Quote:
Originally Posted by gsdsar View Post
Use "wait". Not "stay" if the dog is not in a specific command. Personally I don't use "stay". If I tell my dog to "sit" he should stay sitting until I tell him otherwise. But wait can be general command telling a dog to not cross over a threshold, but still allowed to move about behind said threshold.


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Thanks, this is what I've been thinking. He's been trying to tell me this for some time now, because when I say "stay" after another command, I get the head tilt.

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02-25-2014 08:57 PM
gsdsar
Quote:
Originally Posted by Curtis View Post
A light bulb came on in my head today about this as we were training in the backyard. I put him in a "sit" and realized that he wasn't going to move until I released him. So I sprinted away from him without giving "stay", and he just waited for the next command.

Now I'm not sure when to use stay lol.


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Use "wait". Not "stay" if the dog is not in a specific command. Personally I don't use "stay". If I tell my dog to "sit" he should stay sitting until I tell him otherwise. But wait can be general command telling a dog to not cross over a threshold, but still allowed to move about behind said threshold.


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02-25-2014 08:20 PM
Curtis
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sp00ks View Post
However, she says there is no more "stay". You put them in a down, climb or sit and they should stay there until released or "Free".
A light bulb came on in my head today about this as we were training in the backyard. I put him in a "sit" and realized that he wasn't going to move until I released him. So I sprinted away from him without giving "stay", and he just waited for the next command.

Now I'm not sure when to use stay lol.


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02-25-2014 08:11 PM
boomer11 well then just teach "stay" just like you taught it to your other dog. if stay to you means dont cross an invisible line then teach it to mean that. just dont sit,stay or down,stay. stay is its own command.
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