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Thread: What do you do when you feel your GSD just isn't a fit? Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
03-01-2014 04:29 PM
pets4life
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chip18 View Post
Very true but..Female/Female dynamics can be very different! Seltzer explained it very well!

I've dealt with Dominant Male dogs,Tow males fighting is usually over who's top dogs. Two females can fight simple because, the other dog exist! Good luck fixing that!

Not saying that's the case here, but it's something that anyone thinking about a two female dog household should be well aware of!

As I say my background is Boxer's, out here Boxer's and Buddies will not place a Female Boxer in a household that already has a Female Boxer! A different breed is a maybe.

I saw my baby girl nut open on my BullMastiff over baby kittens (my Mistake) I had to pull here off and I held her in a headlock till she calmed down.

Nobody got hurt but it made a permanent impression on me! I had never seen a dog move that fast!

That includes breaking up a neighbors GSD and Dobbie in a back yard fight. One owner was going to get a Gun! I grabbed a hose problem solved.


But my Female nutting up is what sticks most in mind. Two females..yes it can be done but, nothing I'll ever do.

And for everyone that has multi Female households with out issue..yep your better at then me! "A man's got to know his limitations!"

As I say my background is Boxer's, out here Boxer's and Buddies will not place a Female Boxer in a household that already has a Female Boxer! A different breed is a maybe.

I saw my baby girl nut open on my BullMastiff over baby kittens (my Mistake) I had to pull here off and I held her in a headlock till she calmed down.

Nobody got hurt but it made a permanent impression on me! I had never seen a dog move that fast!

A GUn to break up a dog fight? Who were they going to shoot? thats insane i would have called the cops.

What your female did is what mine has done before also around my cat she "pretends to be a mother" and just goes insane acting she has to fight for the cats life even tho the cat doesnt even like her. Really Wierd.
02-25-2014 07:10 PM
selzer
Quote:
Originally Posted by pets4life View Post
selzer i dont know if mine is the exception she seems more dominant after spay ? or could just be the age.
Yeah, they have a hormone that can make them more calm, associated with the pieces parts that are removed. They did a study and found that bitches after a spay can actually be more reactive. On the flip side, a bitch coming into season, in standing heat, or in a false or regular pregnancy CAN have some hormonal changes that increase bitch fighting and moodyness in general. So, it's could be a trade off.

Got to love bitches. I feel like Hagrid when he is disappointed with a critters lack of poisonous fangs. "The gargoyles in the committee for the control of magical beasts have it in for interesting creatures." While I quoted that, it is really para-phrasing.
02-25-2014 06:27 PM
pets4life selzer i dont know if mine is the exception she seems more dominant after spay ? or could just be the age.
02-23-2014 02:06 PM
Gwenhwyfair In blue describes my Smitty dog to a T. He was a street dog and I adopted him when he was about 1 1/2 years old. I call him an 'independent spirit' 'cause he could care less about his people.

I'd only had dogs like your other dog and was completely nonplussed as how to deal with him. When I would finally get him to respond to a simple command like "sit" and try to praise him or give him a treat he literally turned his head away from me. He just didn't want to play that game.......

BUT.....

What I finally learned was, I was too slow for him. I wasn't giving him a reason to be engaged with me. I was too slow with my rewards, to boring with my body language, didn't release him fast enough to build his concentration over time. I suppose because he had had to fend for himself for so long (or it's genetic probably both) I had to make up for the vacuum that had occurred when he was a puppy.

After several years of having resigned myself to having 'Mr. Aloof' I found the key with the right trainer and now he's so much fun and I get compliments on him all the time. Ultimately I used the method mostly patterned after Micheal Ellis, a well known trainer amongst many who own GSDs and Malinios.

And....

It was a lot of work at first. It was worth it though and once I found out the key to get Smitty more engaged with me we made much progress. He's like a different dog now.

This may not be the time or the place for you to cope with a dog like that I respect that but it's not the dog usually, it's us humans who haven't found the right key to unlock the potential.

Again, NO disrespect meant and I DO respect if you decide to rehome her because it can frustrating if you are busy, have work, family and such so I understand. It's just that your description of Violet is so like what my Smitty dog was when I adopted him.




Quote:
Originally Posted by strychix View Post
Thank you all for your input. I'm going to reply with some generalized points due to what people are saying, and my own thoughts over the course of the last day, so if it's not particularly precise I apologize.

James (my boyfriend) and I have both only owned male dogs until we got Ambrosia last summer. She is such a good dog for us. Well, more me, she's definitely "my dog." But needless to say, we've never owned two females before. We expected what one would from two males, a bit of scuffling, some misbehavior, some prickliness, but with males it subsides and becomes less frequent and less dangerous over time (usually, of course there are exceptions when a dog is aggressive, but neither of us had that). Meanwhile, here it seems to get worse and more frequent.

Separating them is an issue only because Violet really only wants to be with Ambrosia, who wants nothing to do with her. Since the first week they've been together, I haven't even seen Ambrosia sleep within a five foot distance of Violet.

More than anything, I think the two aren't really suited for each other and have absolutely opposite desires and needs. Ambrosia wants to learn, is focused, wants to be with humans, and loves nothing more than a good game of fetch followed by sleeping at my feet. Violet is more dog-oriented, wants to play with Ambrosia, has absolutely no interest in toys, and is far more difficult to train because she doesn't want to please us, she wants to please Ambrosia. In fact, the times she does the best in training is when she follows Ambrosia's example.

Ambrosia will learn a trick so you play with her, Violet doesn't want to learn anything because she has no reward system that we can provide her because she is not food-oriented, toy-oriented.
She wants to play with the other dog and the other dog does not want to play with her.

There are no GSD trainers really in the area. The one trainer in the area doesn't even do one-on-one and I have been to them for a previous dog and was not particularly thrilled with the experience. It's more punishment oriented than I prefer, and I always have gotten better results at home using clicker training.

If I do give her up, I will have very specific guidelines for the home because I have a good idea of what she needs. Some of it we have, some of it we do not. She's not a burden or anything, so we have no problem keeping her until the right thing would come along, it's more that we feel she is not working out for her own benefit rather than ours.
02-23-2014 12:33 PM
doggiedad praise and petting.

Quote:
Originally Posted by strychix View Post
Thank you all for your input. I'm going to reply with some generalized points due to what people are saying, and my own thoughts over the course of the last day, so if it's not particularly precise I apologize.

James (my boyfriend) and I have both only owned male dogs until we got Ambrosia last summer. She is such a good dog for us. Well, more me, she's definitely "my dog." But needless to say, we've never owned two females before. We expected what one would from two males, a bit of scuffling, some misbehavior, some prickliness, but with males it subsides and becomes less frequent and less dangerous over time (usually, of course there are exceptions when a dog is aggressive, but neither of us had that). Meanwhile, here it seems to get worse and more frequent.

Separating them is an issue only because Violet really only wants to be with Ambrosia, who wants nothing to do with her. Since the first week they've been together, I haven't even seen Ambrosia sleep within a five foot distance of Violet.

More than anything, I think the two aren't really suited for each other and have absolutely opposite desires and needs. Ambrosia wants to learn, is focused, wants to be with humans, and loves nothing more than a good game of fetch followed by sleeping at my feet. Violet is more dog-oriented, wants to play with Ambrosia, has absolutely no interest in toys, and is far more difficult to train because she doesn't want to please us, she wants to please Ambrosia. In fact, the times she does the best in training is when she follows Ambrosia's example.

Ambrosia will learn a trick so you play with her,

>>>>> Violet doesn't want to learn anything because she has no reward system that we can provide her because she is not food-oriented, toy-oriented. <<<<<

She wants to play with the other dog and the other dog does not want to play with her.

There are no GSD trainers really in the area. The one trainer in the area doesn't even do one-on-one and I have been to them for a previous dog and was not particularly thrilled with the experience. It's more punishment oriented than I prefer, and I always have gotten better results at home using clicker training.

If I do give her up, I will have very specific guidelines for the home because I have a good idea of what she needs. Some of it we have, some of it we do not. She's not a burden or anything, so we have no problem keeping her until the right thing would come along, it's more that we feel she is not working out for her own benefit rather than ours.
02-23-2014 12:25 PM
strychix Thank you all for your input. I'm going to reply with some generalized points due to what people are saying, and my own thoughts over the course of the last day, so if it's not particularly precise I apologize.

James (my boyfriend) and I have both only owned male dogs until we got Ambrosia last summer. She is such a good dog for us. Well, more me, she's definitely "my dog." But needless to say, we've never owned two females before. We expected what one would from two males, a bit of scuffling, some misbehavior, some prickliness, but with males it subsides and becomes less frequent and less dangerous over time (usually, of course there are exceptions when a dog is aggressive, but neither of us had that). Meanwhile, here it seems to get worse and more frequent.

Separating them is an issue only because Violet really only wants to be with Ambrosia, who wants nothing to do with her. Since the first week they've been together, I haven't even seen Ambrosia sleep within a five foot distance of Violet.

More than anything, I think the two aren't really suited for each other and have absolutely opposite desires and needs. Ambrosia wants to learn, is focused, wants to be with humans, and loves nothing more than a good game of fetch followed by sleeping at my feet. Violet is more dog-oriented, wants to play with Ambrosia, has absolutely no interest in toys, and is far more difficult to train because she doesn't want to please us, she wants to please Ambrosia. In fact, the times she does the best in training is when she follows Ambrosia's example.

Ambrosia will learn a trick so you play with her, Violet doesn't want to learn anything because she has no reward system that we can provide her because she is not food-oriented, toy-oriented. She wants to play with the other dog and the other dog does not want to play with her.

There are no GSD trainers really in the area. The one trainer in the area doesn't even do one-on-one and I have been to them for a previous dog and was not particularly thrilled with the experience. It's more punishment oriented than I prefer, and I always have gotten better results at home using clicker training.

If I do give her up, I will have very specific guidelines for the home because I have a good idea of what she needs. Some of it we have, some of it we do not. She's not a burden or anything, so we have no problem keeping her until the right thing would come along, it's more that we feel she is not working out for her own benefit rather than ours.
02-23-2014 12:57 AM
Chip18
Quote:
Originally Posted by doggiedad View Post
you have to train and socialize to make a good fit.
Very true but..Female/Female dynamics can be very different! Seltzer explained it very well!

I've dealt with Dominant Male dogs,Tow males fighting is usually over who's top dogs. Two females can fight simple because, the other dog exist! Good luck fixing that!

Not saying that's the case here, but it's something that anyone thinking about a two female dog household should be well aware of!

As I say my background is Boxer's, out here Boxer's and Buddies will not place a Female Boxer in a household that already has a Female Boxer! A different breed is a maybe.

I saw my baby girl nut open on my BullMastiff over baby kittens (my Mistake) I had to pull here off and I held her in a headlock till she calmed down.

Nobody got hurt but it made a permanent impression on me! I had never seen a dog move that fast!

That includes breaking up a neighbors GSD and Dobbie in a back yard fight. One owner was going to get a Gun! I grabbed a hose problem solved.


But my Female nutting up is what sticks most in mind. Two females..yes it can be done but, nothing I'll ever do.

And for everyone that has multi Female households with out issue..yep your better at then me! "A man's got to know his limitations!"
02-23-2014 12:12 AM
doggiedad you have to train and socialize to make a good fit.
02-22-2014 10:58 PM
Chip18 I'm gonna guest you did not do the "Two Week Shutdown"? My speciality is Boxers and two gilrs are strictly a "NO"!

I don't know about GSD females though so the above is all I got.
02-22-2014 09:18 PM
Merciel Maybe it's because I foster routinely and have placed dozens of dogs, and maybe it's because I would not-so-secretly really like to kick Crookytail out to another home, but my feeling has always been that your primary obligation is to ensure the dog's happiness.

If the dog can have a great life with you, and can be happier there than anywhere else, great! Keep the dog. Make it happy. Honor that commitment completely to the end.

If for whatever reason the dog is not completely happy and fulfilled with you, and could/would be happier somewhere else, and there's nothing you can or want to do to alter that fact, and the dog would be a legitimately welcome addition to someone else's family (i.e., you are not just dumping an unmanageable problem into someone else's life), then rehome the dog.

I'm not egocentric enough to think that every dog on Earth is going to be happiest in my home. Many of them would be (and are) much happier being pampered as the center of attention in someone else's life.

I have never found it difficult to find awesome, loving, dedicated homes for my foster dogs. I blog about them a lot, with detailed writeups of their observed behavior, updates on their training progress, and new pictures and videos posted on a daily or near-daily basis. Then I post a link to the blog writeups on their Petfinder listings. Many rescues will be willing to post the dog as a courtesy listing if you ask them politely for help (and maybe offer a little volunteer work to compensate them for the inconvenience).

My experience has been that the very best homes are thrilled to have all that extra information, and start feeling an attachment to the dog right from the beginning. They will go to considerable lengths to adopt once they feel that connection. Meanwhile, not-so-good homes seem to feel intimidated or overwhelmed by the mountain of text and pretty much disappear after initial contact.

Putting all that stuff together involves a fair amount of work, but it is more effective than anything else I've tried in attracting great homes and weeding out less desirable ones. So that has been a really good strategy for me, personally, and if you do end up looking into rehoming options, that's an approach I would recommend.
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