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Thread: 8.5 month old dog reactive Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
02-21-2014 08:19 AM
GS_
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chip18 View Post

Your dog has to be able to properly walk on a leash first!
She does actually, she walks very nice on the leash. It's just that she goes crazy when seeing another dog. So as log as we don't see other dogs she walks beautiful on the leash.
02-21-2014 08:16 AM
GS_ Also my mom would like that her bearded collie would be friends with my girl. I agree it would be nice in the summer on family barbecues the dogs could play in the large yard and all but wouldn't it be counterproductive to let them meet? I mean I'm trying to teach her to ignore other dogs but I wouldnt mind if she is off leash playing with my moms dog. We tried to let them meet once but that didn't go too well. It was on the collies territorium and the collie was over-excited and my girl was just scared. The collie ran straight up to her checking her out with one leg lifted. My girl was scared and started whining. When I took the collie away from her she recoverd instantly and invited the collie to play again. But again the collie drove her into a corner sniffing her. That's when I ended the meeting.
(The meeting took place when she was 6 months old, the collie is 2 years old)

Do you think its counterproductive to let them meet again?
Do you think the meeting will go smoother on neutral territory?
02-21-2014 04:04 AM
GS_ Should I avoid other dogs while doing leash training for now? Because if I take her to the city for example it's hard to avoid them. Also some people told me a muzzle can make a dog nervous? Im not scared she will bite altough I admitt I'm sometimes scared she pulls her out of her collar or the leash would slip my hands when she goes crazy seeing another dog across the street and get hit by a car.
Quote:
Originally Posted by David Taggart View Post
The handler on video doesn't exist for the dog, only the prong. Young energy is bursting, a use of prong would cause only frustration and a real agressiveness in a few months as a result. The dog is thursty for stimulating his senses, but nothing is happening. Play ball in some enclosed court off leash. I'd suggest to take him in the wild woods by car, exhaust him on a long leash, bathing in some pools or a lake would be good too, make him hungry, and train leash manners right after with treats in your pocket. By turning back 180 degrees every time he pulls the leash and rewarding for walking next to you would finally help you to grab his attention. Make your dog busy on your walks, train him to catch treats in the air, ask "Sit", "Down", turn his nose to something on the ground, anything to keep his attention on you. The dog barks in order to drive your attention to the object of irritation, watch your body language, don't turn your face in that direction ( you may think he doesn't watch you, but he does) and never stop, just slow down your pace. Muzzle him and take him to really busy places like shopping centres and public parks where he would be unable to concentrate on anything particular, choose a muzzle Royal Soft Nappa Adjustable Anti-Barking Leather Dog Muzzle [M63##1073 Nappa Padded Muzzle] - $79.00 : Dog harness , Dog collar , Dog leash , Dog muzzle - Dog training equipment from Trusted Direct Source - Home, Dog Supplies
with which you can feed treats and water your dog, be relaxed about biting. Just thinking that he might bite somebody makes you tense, and your own nervousness passes to your dog.
02-20-2014 08:49 PM
David Taggart The handler on video doesn't exist for the dog, only the prong. Young energy is bursting, a use of prong would cause only frustration and a real agressiveness in a few months as a result. The dog is thursty for stimulating his senses, but nothing is happening. Play ball in some enclosed court off leash. I'd suggest to take him in the wild woods by car, exhaust him on a long leash, bathing in some pools or a lake would be good too, make him hungry, and train leash manners right after with treats in your pocket. By turning back 180 degrees every time he pulls the leash and rewarding for walking next to you would finally help you to grab his attention. Make your dog busy on your walks, train him to catch treats in the air, ask "Sit", "Down", turn his nose to something on the ground, anything to keep his attention on you. The dog barks in order to drive your attention to the object of irritation, watch your body language, don't turn your face in that direction ( you may think he doesn't watch you, but he does) and never stop, just slow down your pace. Muzzle him and take him to really busy places like shopping centres and public parks where he would be unable to concentrate on anything particular, choose a muzzle Royal Soft Nappa Adjustable Anti-Barking Leather Dog Muzzle [M63##1073 Nappa Padded Muzzle] - $79.00 : Dog harness , Dog collar , Dog leash , Dog muzzle - Dog training equipment from Trusted Direct Source - Home, Dog Supplies
with which you can feed treats and water your dog, be relaxed about biting. Just thinking that he might bite somebody makes you tense, and your own nervousness passes to your dog.
02-20-2014 08:10 PM
Chip18 Oh and good for you on posting the links and asking opinions! I'd have said what I just said sooner but I recognized him so I let it slide.
02-20-2014 08:08 PM
Chip18
Quote:
Originally Posted by GS_ View Post
]I just found 2 youtube videos from a trainer that deals with the same behaviour problem as my girl has. I would like to hear your opinions about this method.
(In the title it says "leash aggression" altough this is not an aggression issue. The trainer himself says the behaviour is not agression. I don't know why the title says "aggression" instead of "leash reactive"?)
Wow, if that's the video your using for a reference, you have set your standards very high!

That guy is really good, and I don't know if I could produce that result that quickly! I like him and I use him but I use him (with the 90 lbs pitt on a prong) to say: if you can't follow and understand what this guy is doing...don't use a prong!

Your dog has to be able to properly walk on a leash first! The video I posted you can do, and "won't do any harm"!

And don't go looking for dogs to add stress at this point! Your still learning your dog.
Get him to walk on a leash first, then you'll find something like this a bit simpler:


Finally if it's all abit confusing find a qualified training or at least ask for a consultation, I did that with my first dog.

I though he was Dominant Aggressive Male! The guy checked him out and said no your dogs "not" a Dominant "Aggressive" Male, he's a Dominant Male but he's just an A Hole!
02-20-2014 07:56 PM
GS_
Quote:
Originally Posted by Msmaria View Post
i dont see why not, its all positive with rewards and treats. Basically, your treating her for being calm. The behavior you want.
Does a dog really get it when he gets a treat for being calm? I mean do they make the link treat - calm state of mind? I think it's easier to teach a dog to do something (active things) then to teach a state of mind?

Example:
treat-sit, treat-lay down, treat-watch me,... than to treat when not barking or lunging?
02-20-2014 07:42 PM
Msmaria
Quote:
Originally Posted by GS_ View Post
Should desensitization and counterconditioning also be used when the behaviour is caused by over-excitement? The article talks about fear, anxiety and aggression but not about excitement. I personally find it very hard sometimes to determine whether the reactiveness towards other dogs is based on over-excitment and/or uncertainty. I got the impression that my girl sometimes barks and lunges because she is unsure and sometimes because of over- excitement.
i dont see why not, its all positive with rewards and treats. Basically, your treating her for being calm. The behavior you want.
02-20-2014 07:36 PM
David Winners
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chip18 View Post
Nothing to add to that!

Now a days "my" approach is if I'm not getting the results I want with regular "tools"flat collar or the (Martingale? collar) and a flat leash, then I think... what am "I" doing wrong???

You can't screw up your dog doing this:
Stop your dog from pulling on the leash video - YouTube

If you use a prong improperly...you can screw up your dog.
I disagree. You can screw up a dog with a flat collar. You can allow it to practice self reinforcing behavior which will increase that behavior. Per a chiropractor in a recent article, you can cause spinal problems.

I'll timed praise is as bad as I'll timed corrections. Look at the first video. They were praising the dog for bad behavior, making it worse.

I don't really understand what you mean by "regular tools." I regularly use a harness, prong and e-collar. I don't use a flat collar for much except detection on a 6' leash and to hold identification tags.

Again, this conversation would be more productive talking about what is going on with the dog and why these methods work versus equipment preference. I don't use a prong because it is a prong. I use it because it allows me to communicate with the dog in a way that removes opposition reflex.

David Winners
02-20-2014 07:17 PM
GS_ Should desensitization and counterconditioning also be used when the behaviour is caused by over-excitement? The article talks about fear, anxiety and aggression but not about excitement. I personally find it very hard sometimes to determine whether the reactiveness towards other dogs is based on over-excitment and/or uncertainty. I got the impression that my girl sometimes barks and lunges because she is unsure and sometimes because of over- excitement.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Msmaria View Post
heres an article on counter conditioning reactive

http://www.peninsulahumanesociety.or...nditioning.pdf dogs.
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