German Shepherd Dog Forums - Reply to Topic

Increase font size: 0, 10, 25, 50%

GermanShepherds.com is the premier German Shepherd Forum on the internet. Registered Users do not see the above ads.
Thread: Can our lifestyle stunt their growth? Reply to Thread
Title:
  
Message:
Trackback
Send Trackbacks to (Separate multiple URLs with spaces):
Post Icons
You may choose an icon for your message from the following list:
 

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the German Shepherd Dog Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
If you do not want to register, fill this field only and the name will be used as user name for your post.
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



Additional Options
Miscellaneous Options

Topic Review (Newest First)
02-15-2014 08:56 PM
coulter
Quote:
Originally Posted by RubyTuesday View Post
It sounds as though your lifestyle has helped you raise a happy, healthy, well socialized, thoroughly wonderful companion whose genetic code dictated 55 lbs rather than 70 lbs. Lucky, lucky girl to have such a life available to her! Lucky future pupster to have such a richly rewarding life awaiting him.

Personally, I don't 'try' to make puppies lean or plump. I feed em well, make sure they are growing & healthy, & let nature do her thing. *shrug*I took the same approach to my daughter's nutrition.
Thank you, yes I love the lifestyle that I am able to give Sage and will be able to give my new boy starting next week. It's awesome to have a dog that's well socialized and trained(for the most part). Sage has never shown any aggression towards another dog or human that was not wanted. I love being able to give her exercise throughout the day while I'm working. Instead of her being cooped up in a house all day.
02-14-2014 09:28 PM
RubyTuesday Very true, Dainerra. I must admit I'm baffled at why so many people seem concerned the dog doesn't weigh enough & so few worry that s/he weighs too much...Especially when too heavy is far more prevalent & usually a real health concern. The concerns that dogs are 'too thin' often seem to be grounded in appearance rather than the underlying health. This seems to be true even with vets!
02-14-2014 08:19 PM
Dainerra also, at 1.5 years old your girl has almost 2 more years of "filling out" before she reaches her adult weight.
02-14-2014 05:12 PM
RubyTuesday It sounds as though your lifestyle has helped you raise a happy, healthy, well socialized, thoroughly wonderful companion whose genetic code dictated 55 lbs rather than 70 lbs. Lucky, lucky girl to have such a life available to her! Lucky future pupster to have such a richly rewarding life awaiting him.

Personally, I don't 'try' to make puppies lean or plump. I feed em well, make sure they are growing & healthy, & let nature do her thing. *shrug*I took the same approach to my daughter's nutrition.
02-13-2014 11:32 AM
sourdough44 When I've been on active trips with dogs, camping, hunting, whatever, I may crate the dog for part of the day. That is, let them have a good amount of enjoyment and exercise, but keep the amount reasonable.

The amount may depend of factors like temp, age & condition of dog & what they are doing. Even if they are not doing much, but may get into trouble, a crate can be handy. Some dogs would almost run themselves to death, which has happened more than a few times with Labs.

In general dogs MUCH prefer to be with or near their owners. They would rather the owner came by every few hours & interact with them, than be put up at the local boarding facility. If the weather is right I have left the dog in the camper shell covered bed of our truck. I just made sure I came by often & tended to her needs.

One just has to stay aware of where one is parked.
02-13-2014 12:20 AM
Lucy Dog
Quote:
Originally Posted by coulter View Post
Yes I totally agree that HD and ED are mostly genetics but are you saying you don't think anything physical has no effect on causing one or the other?
Well, I wouldn't let my puppy jump off a 6 foot rock onto concrete. I also wouldn't force my puppy to run along a bike for miles on concrete either. Use common sense with exercise and puppies. Running up and down stairs or running around the yard chasing the ball just being a normal puppy isn't going to ruin a perfectly healthy dog's hips.

Now if the dog already has bad hips or elbows, that's when I'd be a lot more careful with exercise. I'd imagine hard running and repetitive impact type exercise would make a dog with already bad hips worse.
02-13-2014 12:10 AM
coulter
Quote:
Originally Posted by carmspack View Post
during growth periods the dogs needs the building blocks of high nutrition , not to be rationed out -- there is a difference between skinny and well fed lean . This is when bone and cartilage and muscle are formed. Sometimes these dogs kept lean in an effort to help prevent hip problems are under nourished .
high value , high density , including fat which is necessary for digestion and brain health.
That's true, it's like a diet. Not eating and getting skinny is not enough. You must have the right food and nutritions. I'd say in the first 8 months Sage was on the skinny side. But after that and when I started adding raw to her diet she has been slim and perfect, with having the right nutritions.
02-13-2014 12:06 AM
coulter
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lucy Dog View Post
Let the puppy be a puppy. I never restrict anything. If the dog wants to run, let him run.

Restricting stuff like stairs or a little jumping around seems a little crazy if you ask me. HD or ED is genetic, so he's either going to have it or won't.
Yes I totally agree that HD and ED are mostly genetics but are you saying you don't think anything physical has no effect on causing one or the other?
02-12-2014 08:01 AM
carmspack during growth periods the dogs needs the building blocks of high nutrition , not to be rationed out -- there is a difference between skinny and well fed lean . This is when bone and cartilage and muscle are formed. Sometimes these dogs kept lean in an effort to help prevent hip problems are under nourished .
high value , high density , including fat which is necessary for digestion and brain health.
02-11-2014 11:43 PM
Lucy Dog Let the puppy be a puppy. I never restrict anything. If the dog wants to run, let him run.

Restricting stuff like stairs or a little jumping around seems a little crazy if you ask me. HD or ED is genetic, so he's either going to have it or won't.
This thread has more than 10 replies. Click here to review the whole thread.

Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 10:04 AM.



Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
SEO by vBSEO 3.3.2
PetGuide.com
Basset.net DobermanTalk.com GoldenRetrieverForum.com OurBeagleWorld.com
BoxerForums.com DogForums.com GoPitbull.com PoodleForum.com
BulldogBreeds.com FishForums.com HavaneseForum.com SpoiledMaltese.com
CatForum.com GermanShepherds.com Labradoodle-dogs.net YorkieForum.com
Chihuahua-People.com RetrieverBreeds.com