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Thread: How do I teach my dog..(the 'watch' command?) Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
02-07-2014 05:21 PM
Scout's Mama
Quote:
Originally Posted by David Winners View Post
I would say it is primarily a matter of relationship. When the dog is worked regularly and the act of working with the handler is rewarding, the likelihood of maintaining engagement increases. The dog gets into the habit of engaging with the handler because good stuff happens when you are working together. That good stuff includes the mutually rewarding act of cooperation and having fun together, not just treats.

This is reinforced by the reward schedule, but I believe that willing obedience is built through a combination of trust and partnership, communication, rewards and proofing behaviors.

David Winners
Makes sense, thanks!
02-07-2014 02:49 PM
David Winners
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scout's Mama View Post
Just to throw another element in the mix, how do you add "urgency" to the dog's response to training. That is, as an alpha how do you ensure that they respond on your time and not their own? In adulthood, Shadow would perform a command before I finished giving it, but I don't remember what we did to get that, and our old trainer moved three states away.... anyway, is that a bonding/maturity variable or a training/reinforcement variable?
I would say it is primarily a matter of relationship. When the dog is worked regularly and the act of working with the handler is rewarding, the likelihood of maintaining engagement increases. The dog gets into the habit of engaging with the handler because good stuff happens when you are working together. That good stuff includes the mutually rewarding act of cooperation and having fun together, not just treats.

This is reinforced by the reward schedule, but I believe that willing obedience is built through a combination of trust and partnership, communication, rewards and proofing behaviors.

David Winners
02-07-2014 02:40 PM
Cassidy's Mom
Quote:
Originally Posted by OriginalWacky View Post
So, when we are training (okay, when *I* train), we only increase one D at a time. And to help the dog learn, I will ease up on the other D's when I'm increasing one. So if I've upped the Difficulty, I'll lower my criteria for Distance, Duration, and Distraction just a little bit to set her up to succeed. So I'm not going to expect her to sit on the bathroom floor while I'm five feet away like she does in the living room, I'm going to do it from two feet away and give her the chance to get it right. As you're going through training, you'll be able to increase the D's more quickly as she gets more into learning, but when you're in the beginning stages, it might help to think of the four D's.
I've always thought of it as the 3 D's - any time you add distance, duration, or distractions you're automatically increasing the level of difficulty, so for me that "D" goes without saying. But anyway, you're absolutely right about working on only one of those things one at a time, and lowering the criteria for the others, and also generalizing to a variety of situations.
02-07-2014 10:35 AM
Scout's Mama Just to throw another element in the mix, how do you add "urgency" to the dog's response to training. That is, as an alpha how do you ensure that they respond on your time and not their own? In adulthood, Shadow would perform a command before I finished giving it, but I don't remember what we did to get that, and our old trainer moved three states away.... anyway, is that a bonding/maturity variable or a training/reinforcement variable?
02-07-2014 09:34 AM
hwtan my rescued gsd has been training obedience at meal time.

the food bowl on a high table

with him sitting next to me.

i say "look", when see the eye ball moving slightly toward me, i click and feed (from the bowl)

just repeat this, he will eventually look at you before he gets the food.
02-07-2014 08:57 AM
blackshep I don't know if I taught my dog the proper way, but I'd tell her 'watch' and would wait until she locked her eyes on mine and quickly say "YES!" and reward. Then as she got better, I would say 'yes' right away to mark the behavior, but wait a little longer before rewarding with food, with her watching my face the whole time.

Rinse repeat. Eventually they put two and two together.

And then like the other's said, you have to start to change the location, to a different room, then to the outdoors, then to a park, but far away from other people, then move closer etc to slowly up the distraction factor. My dog still get's a bit distracted somewhere like the training hall, but we just keep working at it.
02-07-2014 08:14 AM
OriginalWacky
Quote:
Originally Posted by David Winners View Post
SuperG gave some good advice.

She probably hasn't generalized the command in different situations yet.

David Winners
That's probably exactly it, dogs are not very good at generalization. She may do well with a command in the living room, and then fall apart when you try it in the kitchen, because everything she thought was right has changed. She thought she was doing good because when you are both in the living room, and facing the window, she hears that word you say and is supposed to look at your eyes. But in the kitchen, she might not think it applies yet. You have to almost re-teach it. And then re-teach it outside. And then re-teach it at puppy class. Most likely, she'll figure it out faster the second time. And then faster the third time. And you may not have to re-teach it after that, but you may need to refresh it a bit here and there.

One of the things I learned about training was the four D's of training: Difficulty, Duration, Distance, Distraction. These should be self explanatory, but just in case, I'll tell you how I think of them. (Of course, other people may think of all this in different ways, that doesn't make them wrong, just different.)

Difficulty: Anything can be made harder. So she sits in the living room when you tell her to. Will she sit in the bathroom? On a different surface? If you sit down on the floor? If you turn your back on her? In the back yard while you climb a tree? (Okay, that's silly, but you get the point - it's harder to sit on a slippery bathroom floor than it is in a living room.)

Duration: Well, easy, but hey. She sits for 2 seconds every time. Awesome. Now how long will she sit before she loses interest? Puppies have a short attention span, and expecting them to sit for a full two or three minutes is pretty tough. But you can probably work on a few more seconds here and there, and build up from there.

Distance: This one kinda has two parts. One is how far away can you be from your dog and have her sit on command. The other is how well she will stay sitting while you walk away from her. Both involve distance, in different ways. Again, you will need to work your way up from being right there to being across the room, across the yard, across a football field, whatever you need.

Distraction: These can range from super easy to OMG NIGHTMARE distractions, and the dog is the one who decides what level a distraction is. Some dogs could care less about other people and so people are a fairly easy distraction to work with, but are super interested in other animals, so those are a tough distraction. Some dogs are only distracted a little bit by things, others are distracted by the teeniest breeze blowing by.

So, when we are training (okay, when *I* train), we only increase one D at a time. And to help the dog learn, I will ease up on the other D's when I'm increasing one. So if I've upped the Difficulty, I'll lower my criteria for Distance, Duration, and Distraction just a little bit to set her up to succeed. So I'm not going to expect her to sit on the bathroom floor while I'm five feet away like she does in the living room, I'm going to do it from two feet away and give her the chance to get it right. As you're going through training, you'll be able to increase the D's more quickly as she gets more into learning, but when you're in the beginning stages, it might help to think of the four D's.

Wow, sorry for turning this into a book, and I hope it helps a little bit?
02-05-2014 03:35 AM
David Winners SuperG gave some good advice.

She probably hasn't generalized the command in different situations yet.

David Winners
02-05-2014 01:30 AM
Powerfulmind I don't remember putting "the watch command" in my title.. but I do use look as in "look at me" I never say watch. She just seems to have selective hearing.

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02-04-2014 06:07 PM
Stevenzachsmom
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cassidy's Mom View Post
Some people use "look", as in "look at me", instead of "watch", or "watch me". I assume that's what she's referring to. I don't think it matters what word she uses as long as she's consistent about what she expects when she says it.
Understood. But she used "Watch" in her title and then said she was teaching "Look". I agree any word can be used, but it isn't consistent if she is using two different words for the same thing. When I use watch and look, they mean entirely different things. When I use stay or wait, I mean two different things.
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