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Topic Review (Newest First)
01-28-2014 08:22 AM
ZoeandMoe
Quote:
Originally Posted by lawhyno View Post


I think as long as she's motivated to tug, not being driven for the ball is basically neutralized. Am I right?
My trainer just introduced a ball with a small rope attached to it. It's a ball that can be used for tug as well. Best of both worlds with one toy.
01-28-2014 01:34 AM
lawhyno
Quote:
Originally Posted by boomer11 View Post
thats not really a fair comparison. a more fair one is do you think a timid/submissive dog in this situation is better than one that is confident/bold?? submissive or confident is a better comparison. i'd choose the one thats confident from the get go. when i brought my pup home he didnt give a crap about me. he just knew there were 5 humans around but he didnt care sbout any of them. BUT he acted like he owned the house the moment he stepped inside. he ran around like it was his house and humans were living in it.

she sounds like a good stable pet but her ball drive not coming out would give me pause in terms of a good schtuzhund dog. in terms of a personal protection dog, i dont think any of those dogs have a submissive gene in their body.
I totally hear you. I wouldn't say she's submissive, just a bit timid and laid back. I'd say she's being bold about this change because she hasn't run away from anything. She's been sniffing and facing every foreign object she can find. She's just not being outgoing and initiating play, which I was used to from my last puppy. She is 1 year old, which I think makes it harder to adjust when you've spent all your life in a completely different world.

My last dog was a puppy when I brought her in. Sounded just like yours. Just stomping around, not worried about a single thing. I think puppies are a little easier to adapt when they're young and optimistic, brave, and optimistic… they don't discriminate or have reason to fear anyone yet. She ate anything and everything she saw… as well as biting pants and whatever she could get her mouth on. That's a puppy. Dealing with an older dog is a little different. I'm hoping this works out and my plan of skipping the puppy raising phase will be successful.

I think as long as she's motivated to tug, not being driven for the ball is basically neutralized. Am I right?
01-28-2014 01:23 AM
boomer11
Quote:
Originally Posted by lawhyno View Post
I think a dog that becomes timid or a bit submissive in a situation like this is actually making a more intelligent decision than one that gets nervy and aggressive. This is just a theory…
thats not really a fair comparison. a more fair one is do you think a timid/submissive dog in this situation is better than one that is confident/bold?? submissive or confident is a better comparison. i'd choose the one thats confident from the get go. when i brought my pup home he didnt give a crap about me. he just knew there were 5 humans around but he didnt care sbout any of them. BUT he acted like he owned the house the moment he stepped inside. he ran around like it was his house and humans were living in it.

she sounds like a good stable pet but her ball drive not coming out would give me pause in terms of a good schtuzhund dog. in terms of a personal protection dog, i dont think any of those dogs have a submissive gene in their body.
01-28-2014 12:36 AM
lawhyno
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blitzkrieg1 View Post
I personally have some patients for a pup but a 1 year old that came to me the way your describing for PP or sport would be returned.

If she is just for club level sport and your not particular about the PP part of it then Im sure she will work out just fine if you have a decent decoy once she settles in.

I have a personal aversion to nervy dogs and if I felt like I was being taken after paying good money for a decent dog I would blow a gasket.
Its a tough thing, there are so many people that will sell you a crock of nonsense.

The major danger in buying green dogs is you wonder why the dog is really being sold. Why did the breeder/trainer keep the dog then decide to sell it at 6month to a year. Is it because the dog is not what they were hoping for in terms of nerves, drive etc? If you cant see the dog in person and take the dog off property and somewhere unfamiliar you never really know.
I hear you. She's definitely not nervy, which is a good sign. She's more laid back at this point, which seems to be a better instinctual survival move IMO. I find her to be very smart and quick to learn simple things through short amounts of repetitions. I think a dog that becomes timid or a bit submissive in a situation like this is actually making a more intelligent decision than one that gets nervy and aggressive. This is just a theory…

I wondered and asked the same thing, "why is the dog really being sold?" This dog was the female pick from the litter. I was told the only reason they selling her is because she didn't have extreme ball possession. I asked for their definition of extreme possession and I was told something along the lines of, "possession to the point of aggression when someone tries taking away the ball." This possessiveness was strictly referring to the ball and not applied to other toys. The dog has "normal" ball drive I suppose…

So far, she hasn't been too motivated for toys but that's been developing every day. She will chase a ball but not more than a couple times. She cares more about tugs. This does not bother me at all.

I'll keep you guys posted on what happens with her in the next couple weeks.
01-28-2014 12:26 AM
lawhyno
Quote:
Originally Posted by Merciel View Post
I have zero experience with "real" working dogs. What you're describing is super SUPER common and 100% normal for a pet dog. Almost all of my fosters behaved that way for the first few days or weeks that I had them, especially if they were making a big transition from rural backgrounds to city life. That is a huge change for a dog and extremely stressful.

Every one of them came around within a few weeks and was fine and confident and stable after that initial transition phase. They all went on to become wonderful family pets, and a couple of them are starting recreational sports and/or therapy work.

That said, I would not have expected any of those dogs to be able to do IPO, even at the club level.
Thanks for that. I believe that applies to any dog, no matter the pedigree. It makes sense that a newly transitioned dog would be stressed, no matter the pedigree. It's how they handle it moving forward that really matters to me … and from the sounds of it, I have a good feeling she'll come around. Eventually she'll grow accustomed to my world and she should resume with the same type of confidence she had as a bold shepherd raised in acres of deep forrest… I hope so.... I gotta learn to be patient.
01-27-2014 11:56 PM
Merciel I have zero experience with "real" working dogs. What you're describing is super SUPER common and 100% normal for a pet dog. Almost all of my fosters behaved that way for the first few days or weeks that I had them, especially if they were making a big transition from rural backgrounds to city life. That is a huge change for a dog and extremely stressful.

Every one of them came around within a few weeks and was fine and confident and stable after that initial transition phase. They all went on to become wonderful family pets, and a couple of them are starting recreational sports and/or therapy work.

That said, I would not have expected any of those dogs to be able to do IPO, even at the club level.
01-27-2014 11:48 PM
Blitzkrieg1 I personally have some patients for a pup but a 1 year old that came to me the way your describing for PP or sport would be returned.

If she is just for club level sport and your not particular about the PP part of it then Im sure she will work out just fine if you have a decent decoy once she settles in.

I have a personal aversion to nervy dogs and if I felt like I was being taken after paying good money for a decent dog I would blow a gasket.
Its a tough thing, there are so many people that will sell you a crock of nonsense.

The major danger in buying green dogs is you wonder why the dog is really being sold. Why did the breeder/trainer keep the dog then decide to sell it at 6month to a year. Is it because the dog is not what they were hoping for in terms of nerves, drive etc? If you cant see the dog in person and take the dog off property and somewhere unfamiliar you never really know.
01-27-2014 10:33 PM
lawhyno @onyxgirl… two week shutdown was a great article. Thanks for that.
01-27-2014 10:19 PM
lawhyno @gdsar… thanks for that. Each day she's getting a little more comfortable and slightly more engaged. It's just a very shallow gradient at the moment. At a pace this steady, 2 weeks sounds like a decent timeline.

@onyxgirl… the breeder was a referral from someone I trust. They are reputable and I have a friend who has a relative of my dog who is a very solid sport/protection dog. I would say she's confident so far. She hasn't ran away from anything. She has been a little timid around strange things, but she is moving foreword towards the things that are obviously alien to her. She was accustomed to acres of deep woods and creeks so being in Los Angeles brings a completely different environment (noises, weather, agriculture) and she's sniffing at everything from a table to a shovel to the bbq and the air conditioning unit. She saw her reflection in the french doors and started barking with hackles raised… but that's about the only stressful thing she's experienced so far.
01-27-2014 09:58 PM
onyx'girl Did you have anyone test for your goals her before you purchased her? Most dogs that are for 'sport' are confident right out of the box and don't need to settle to take treats or tug. You do have to take it slowly, IMO and maybe utilize some of the two week shutdown exercises and NILIF to help her settle in.
Are you in a club yet? If so, there should be people that can help you evaluate her and help you with any issues she may have.
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