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Thread: Vet Perspective - Toxic Plants Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
01-27-2014 01:26 PM
Mishka&Milo
Quote:
Originally Posted by huntergreen View Post
i see no reason to have things/plants around that can cause any problem, but that is just me.
I agree. It's just something you can live without. I certainly don't want my pets vomiting and depressed.... Even if it won't cause lasting effects.


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01-27-2014 01:24 PM
Susan_GSD_mom
Quote:
Originally Posted by Springbrz View Post
Interesting articles.



I'm not saying these things are not dangerous to our pets. I think, imho, it has more to do with the actual size of the dog; breed and mostly the amount of the toxin consumed at one time. They never say how much onion it takes to make a dog sick. Or how much garlic or chocolate.
I agree--a dog I had years ago (GSD cross) injured the growth plate in his shoulder, and my vet had me giving him one ibuprofen a day for inflammation. It never harmed him, but today we are told that ibuprofen can cause sudden death. He was a large dog, perhaps that was a factor.

Let me add an experience with a bad toxin... In December we lost our beautiful GSD Cesar... The main culprit was an undiagnosed splenic tumor that ruptured (he was a very large, athletic boy, and could leap straight up an amazing height, and did so at the trunks of trees trying to get squirrels--we believe that's how the tumor ruptured). What made it worse, however, is that we believe he ingested poisonous mushrooms, which affect the clotting factor in blood. The house we just moved into has an area where there are huge pine trees, and the previous owners never raked up the pine needles, they just accumulated and composted, a perfect place for mushrooms to grow. He often rutted around in that area, looking for rabbit poop. When I remembered seeing an occasional mushroom in there, I raked some of it up, and found many, many young mushrooms sprouting under the pine needles, and as I raked them they broke easily apart. So, we feel that the toxins in the mushrooms complicated things, making him bleed out so fast that they could not save him. He died in my arms while they were trying to save him. He never purposely ate the mushrooms, but it would have been an easy thing for him to take in pieces as he was finding and eating rabbit poop. I will be raking that all out and KEEPING it that way when spring comes!

I tried to upload a photo of Cesar, hopefully I was successful.
01-27-2014 01:20 PM
Stevenzachsmom Nigel and I agreed, on a similar thread, that we have had dogs that were seemingly unaffected by anything they ate. We didn't know any better. Now I do and I would refrain from intentionally feeding these foods. I like that the vet explains how the toxin affects the dog.
01-27-2014 12:29 PM
Springbrz Interesting articles.

I have a peace lily I have to keep my pup away from. She has gotten at it a couple of times. Fortunately she didn't get sick.

Personally, I cook almost all meats with onions and garlic. For years we have always given our dogs leftover meats and such (even beef stews). Our last two dogs, chow mixes, lived to be 13.5 & 14.5. I didn't know about onions being bad for dogs until they were well into their senior years. They never had any ill effects, blood work was always good.

My mom had a mutt of all large breeds (newfie, lab, shep). he started every day off with a large bowl of cornflakes and milk. Had coffee and donuts several days a week for years. Got all sorts of table scraps. He had to have consumed a lot of onion, garlic and caffeine over the years. He was a parvo survivor but rarely ever sick as an adult. He lived to 17.

Have a friend that has a beagle/gsd mix. She ate a whole 5lb bag of M&M with peanuts. In that case the dog did have diarrhea and an upset tummy. But did not require any veterinary treatment. She was fine in a couple days after she passed all those peanuts.

I'm not saying these things are not dangerous to our pets. I think, imho, it has more to do with the actual size of the dog; breed and mostly the amount of the toxin consumed at one time. They never say how much onion it takes to make a dog sick. Or how much garlic or chocolate.

It does make sense that the type of chocolate (milk, dark, baking)makes a big difference.

Our current dog is raw fed. I'm older and wiser and much more careful as to what she gets to eat. Live and Learn!
01-27-2014 11:20 AM
Daisy&Lucky's Mom Thanks for sharing. The grapesI knew about but not the Macadamia Nuts.
01-27-2014 11:20 AM
KathrynApril As a kid the family dog ate one of those chocolate chocolate chip cakes from KFC. She ate the whole cake. She clearly didn't feel well but at the time I don't think my parents knew it was toxic. She was fine the next day luckily.

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01-27-2014 10:47 AM
Lilie Very interesting read!
01-27-2014 10:34 AM
shepherdmom
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stevenzachsmom View Post
Here is another article by the same vet, on chocolate, onions, garlic, raisins and Macadamia nuts. I know there will be some argument on garlic. I just appreciate the explanations he gives.

Plant-related food toxins of the Holidays and your pets
Thank you for posting these links. Very interesting reading.
01-27-2014 10:24 AM
Stevenzachsmom Here is another article by the same vet, on chocolate, onions, garlic, raisins and Macadamia nuts. I know there will be some argument on garlic. I just appreciate the explanations he gives.

Plant-related food toxins of the Holidays and your pets
01-27-2014 09:54 AM
Stevenzachsmom huntergreen, I am not a huge fan of house plants. I don't especially enjoy taking care of them. On the other hand, I have an extensive garden. I have some seriously toxic plants out there - Mountain laurel AKA sheep kill and several types of milk weed. I have never had a problem keeping my pets away from the plants. That aside, the point of this article is that the particular plants mentioned are not that dangerous, so why not enjoy them during the holidays - at least those with the least amount of toxins?
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