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Thread: My GSD bit my Neighbor. Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
01-19-2014 10:42 PM
Chip18 It would be a drag leash short leash with no handle to wear in the house something to grab just in case. The muzzle is for the house with company, I don't think you need ti for a run unless he's totally out of control and attacking random strangers and dogs?

Just avoid anybody and other dogs. I never muzzled Rocky out in the field. I have had to face down a charging (sorry folks to those that have them including myself pitt bulls) and had Rocky step up when I slipped while facing down two charging mutts. Rocky stood in front of me and I saw nothing but his teeth!

The dog that did not stop...reconsidered his life choices and retreated! It's a tool for the home the rest is training.
01-19-2014 09:37 PM
Aion I'd just like to thank all of you for your input, me and my family are truly grateful. We will be working on finding a trainer in the area, and I'll be working on getting that muzzle for those runs.
Quote:
Originally Posted by selzer View Post
I have to put my flack jacket on for this one, because you won't like it and neither will some others, but if this was my dog, I would take 10-15 pounds off the dog and neuter him if he is not already fixed. I would lower his intake of food, increase his exercise, and remove the hormones. The dog is a young male, he is full of himself, he is barking and reacting around the doors/showing some territorial aggression and dog aggression.
No worries, I appreciate the input ! I'm actually pretty active, and I tend to take my dog w/ me on my runs on a daily basis. 6 Miles daily & on Fridays/Saturdays we do 15 Miles at the beach. I'm guessing we might be overfeeding him, so I'll try toning the food down a bit and see how that works out for him. The whole leashing him for the majority of the time, I'm not sure how that would play out but I'll definitely try it out for a while and see how it plays out. Thanks again guys!
01-18-2014 11:57 PM
Harry and Lola
Quote:
Originally Posted by selzer View Post
take 10-15 pounds off the dog and neuter him if he is not already fixed. I would lower his intake of food, increase his exercise, and remove the hormones. The dog is a young male, he is full of himself, he is barking and reacting around the doors/showing some territorial aggression and dog aggression. I would also make use of a crate every day. The run of the house is something the dog earns.
Excellent advice - agree totally he needs to be trimmed down, well exercised and neutered. Crate training for this type of dog is essential.
01-18-2014 09:51 PM
selzer I don't think you can muzzle a dog 24/7. The dog was inside, the neighbor was outside in the garage with Dad, and Auntie left the dog out.

Ok, so it was a accident waiting to happen, and now it did. Now you know that your dog will bite. I too think that the dog was unsure about the situation and did not like your dad laying on the ground under a car while this man he does not like was standing over him wielding tools. But I applaud you (your family) for taking responsibility for the accident, because you're right he is your responsibility.

And now you know, he is not all bark. He is a German Shepherd who has teeth and he will use them. The good news is that you all had plenty of warning that the dog did not like this guy, and the dog is generally fine with people. What does this mean, exactly?

Training this dog, won't hurt, and will most likely make him a lot easier to live with. Once you go through some basic training, you can teach him that the garage door is off limits. He only goes out the back door where there is some type of fence, or he has a line he is connected to. Otherwise, he is taken out on leash. This is training, and it can be very helpful.

But management is key. You need to manage the situation. When the neighbor is coming over to work on the car, crate the dog. Then no one inadvertently lets him out where the neighbor is. Always have two lines of defense. A simple screen door will not keep a 105 pound dog in. Sorry. If you cannot keep him from the door, block him from that room. Use baby gates -- if he respects them -- yes dogs do respect a flimsy baby gate, other dogs don't though, so, if he does, use them. Otherwise train him that the front door is NO.

Look up NILIF. I don't think you guys are terrible leaders. It sounds like the dog did what a GSD should do -- not the bite, but after the bite. Your brother yelled at him and he stopped and was able to be called into the house. That's good. If the dog is blowing everyone off, than he would be dancing around the guy, nipping at him, maybe biting again, and totally ignoring your brother. That's not happening. But if by reading through NILIF -- Nothing In Life Is Free, you can fine tune your leadership a little bit, then it is that much better.

I have to put my flack jacket on for this one, because you won't like it and neither will some others, but if this was my dog, I would take 10-15 pounds off the dog and neuter him if he is not already fixed. I would lower his intake of food, increase his exercise, and remove the hormones. The dog is a young male, he is full of himself, he is barking and reacting around the doors/showing some territorial aggression and dog aggression. I would also make use of a crate every day. The run of the house is something the dog earns. For a couple of weeks, maybe months, this dog would be put in his crate when I am not walking him, exercising him in the back yard, feeding him, training him, doing something with him -- actively spending time with him -- that could mean, him sitting at my feet while I watch a show, but the whole time, if the dog moves toward the door, I would say "Eh!, no door!" and call him to me. If he can't sit quietly through the show, I would hook a leash to him and keep it on him while I spend time with him.

Crate for the night.
Up in the morning out to potty,
inside for food,
Good walk 30 - 45 minutes
Good run about in the back yard chase the ball 15 minutes
5-10 minute training session.
Crate time. 3-4 hours.

Out to sit with you while you eat your lunch. 15 minute walk, Back in the crate. 3-4 hours.

This simulates dogs that are crated while the owners work.

Late afternoon, out to potty.
Inside to eat.
30-45 minute walk
15 minute chase the ball
5-15 minute training session.

Inside with leash on.
Eat dinner, dog waits on leash.
Continue to keep the dog with you on leash, take frequent breaks and teach the dog to LOOK!, do sits and downs. Use some treats, and do some tricks. Keep him right next to you, and don't let him rush the doors or windows. If he wants to, say Eh!

We do want our dogs to let us know when something is out there. I usually tell my dogs, "Ok, I see him, enough." "Enough" means to stop whatever you are doing, I have it covered.

And then back in the crate for the night.

It's not forever. It is just until the dog is trained to avoid the doors, and everyone is a little more comfortable. He is a large dog, and he can be dangerous. I don't think he is a bad dog. I think you can work with this.

The good things is that he bit once, he did not continue to attack, and he listened to your brother.

Since this is a family dog, you might have to be a little creative and keep the whole family involved. Leashing him to you might not work, but have people keep him leashed if they bring him out of the crate for a while.

Or give him from 7PM to 11PM freedom of the house, only making sure that someone prevents his guarding doorways, and definitely keeps a solid door between him and outside.

I would not give him free reign all day though.
01-18-2014 09:42 PM
Chip18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Twyla View Post
Locate a trainer/behaviorist in your area at this link : Directory of Certified Applied Animal Behaviorists ? Animal Behavior Society: Applied Animal Behavior . Also look under the sub-forum here for any suggestions for your area: Finding a Good Trainer - German Shepherd Dog Forums . What you want to look for is someone who is experienced with GSD and it is verifiable. Talk with several before choosing one.

As said above, management is key here. He isn't left in the house/yard with anyone who doesn't know his triggers. With a dog who has proven he will bite, you don't have the luxury of 'forgetting'. That means if you or an immediate family member isn't with the dog, he is crated.

He can't sit at the door and bark at passerbys; dog or human. That builds up frustration. Direct his focus to you away from the door/window. In the garage, he is leashed. Again redirect his focus to you at his first stress signal.

Has he had ob training? If not, that will need to be part of the training as well.

When out walking and meeting dogs, at his first sign, get his attention on you. That means when he gets the hard stare, or the ears go straight forward, that is the time to get his attention, not once he has started barking. Walk in a curve around the dog, not head on.

Agree with conditioning him to a basket muzzle. This type will allow him to pant, drink water and get treats. This won't be a tool to use all the time, only the times you just can't avoid him being around strangers - vet etc. At home you can avoid him being around strangers - crate him or have him under your control.

These are all temporary suggestions until you can locate a behaviorist and get their eyes on your dog and see what is going on.
I like the fabric muzzles myself I would use a Blk one on Rocky with company for awhile, it was less scary looking but it was not as secure. Most likely a good choice for people that know what they are doing, it worked for me but yeah I'll stop throwing it out there for "rookies".

I don't want to be responsible for a "my dog was muzzled and he still bit someone thread!
01-18-2014 09:30 PM
Chip18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Msmaria View Post
Have him wear a muzzle. Thats the response I see here alot when having these issues. Find a behaviorist or trainer if you can. It will help alot.
A muzzle as a safety around strangers and company is a reasonable precaution, while "hopefully retraining or training the dog" and if any paper work gets filed it's most likely going to be mandatory?
01-18-2014 09:24 PM
Twyla Locate a trainer/behaviorist in your area at this link : Directory of Certified Applied Animal Behaviorists ? Animal Behavior Society: Applied Animal Behavior . Also look under the sub-forum here for any suggestions for your area: Finding a Good Trainer - German Shepherd Dog Forums . What you want to look for is someone who is experienced with GSD and it is verifiable. Talk with several before choosing one.

As said above, management is key here. He isn't left in the house/yard with anyone who doesn't know his triggers. With a dog who has proven he will bite, you don't have the luxury of 'forgetting'. That means if you or an immediate family member isn't with the dog, he is crated.

He can't sit at the door and bark at passerbys; dog or human. That builds up frustration. Direct his focus to you away from the door/window. In the garage, he is leashed. Again redirect his focus to you at his first stress signal.

Has he had ob training? If not, that will need to be part of the training as well.

When out walking and meeting dogs, at his first sign, get his attention on you. That means when he gets the hard stare, or the ears go straight forward, that is the time to get his attention, not once he has started barking. Walk in a curve around the dog, not head on.

Agree with conditioning him to a basket muzzle. This type will allow him to pant, drink water and get treats. This won't be a tool to use all the time, only the times you just can't avoid him being around strangers - vet etc. At home you can avoid him being around strangers - crate him or have him under your control.

These are all temporary suggestions until you can locate a behaviorist and get their eyes on your dog and see what is going on.
01-18-2014 09:06 PM
SuperG Aion,

I applaud you and your families culpability.

I will assume via your investigation/concern/research of the situation at hand, you will go forward properly.

SuperG
01-18-2014 08:20 PM
Msmaria Have him wear a muzzle. Thats the response I see here alot when having these issues. Find a behaviorist or trainer if you can. It will help alot.
01-18-2014 08:11 PM
Kaimeju I think putting him to sleep would be overkill but you do have to recognize that you've got a dog who will bite and keep him away from people that he does not trust, or has not met. We had a lab mix when I was a kid who would bite. We kept him on our property and he was not allowed to interact with anyone outside the family unless they were briefed on how to act around him and knew what they were getting into.

Unfortunately by letting him act aggressively for so long (even if it's just "noise" to you) he has now got it in his head that it is his job to tell you who is a threat and who isn't. It should be the other way around.

When I had aggression issues with my dog, the best piece of advice a rescue gave me when I tried to rehome her was 1.) get a trainer and 2.) have that trainer show you how to use a prong collar. Prevent bad behavior and reward the heck out of sitting quietly and paying attention to you. I guarantee you there is someone training dogs in your area even if you can't find them on Google.

Rehoming shouldn't be an option because this is too big of a problem to pass onto someone else. Plus he has already bonded with your family.


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