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Topic Review (Newest First)
01-10-2014 07:56 AM
Momto2GSDs Dinovite is a good supplement but be aware that some dogs are sensitive to flax (mine is) which is the main ingredient.
Removing grains from your dogs food AND treats is a great place to start. Many pet foods get a lot of their “protein” from grains instead of from meat. The dogs system was not designed to digest the complex proteins in grains ( such as corn, wheat, oatmeal) so this is why a “grain free” diet is better for those dogs with issues. A raw diet would be the best. Also, popular pet foods that have wheat, corn or fish meal in them is most likely has been contaminated with Mycotoxins, which are toxins from mold and fungi. Another thing is that most “plant products” today are Genetically Modified (GMO’s) which create inflammatory conditions. And, there are some Bacteria’s called Endotoxins which are not destroyed during the cooking process of kibble. Pet food manufacturers do not test for these toxins. These are things that can also weaken or compromise the gut and/or immune system.
A good percentage of dogs have the itching problems due to their food so this is why the NutriScan test is very important.

Here are some high quality, non grain kibbles and treats (that are NOT from China) that may help. Remember to transition slowly to new foods.

ACANA REGIONALS (grain free): Acana Regionals | Acana Store locator: Store Locator | Acana

FROMM'S FOUR STAR (grain free):
Four-Star Gourmet Recipes for dogs - Fromm Family Foods Internet locator: Internet Retailers - Fromm Family Foods


THE HONEST KITCHEN DEHYDRATED FOOD:
EMBARK: Embark - Grain Free, High Protein Dog Food | The Honest Kitchen Store Locator: Where to Buy Honest Kitchen - Honest Kitchen Stores | The Honest Kitchen A 10# box RE-hydrates to about 35 pounds of food.

Treats:
Bravo Bonus Bites: are 100% all meat, and made from all natural, antibiotic-free, grain free meats and organ meat protein sources.
Example: "Dry Roasted" Buffalo Liver: Ingredients Grass-fed buffalo liver.
"Freeze Dried Treats" - Venison Liver: Ingredients Grass-fed venison liver.

Bravo Training Treats:
Made from 100% muscle and organ meats and real Vermont Cheddar Cheese. Contain no grains, fillers or unnecessary additives of any kind. Perfectly sized to be held between two fingers for easy hand-to-dog feeding.
Example: "Turkey Bites" - Ingredients: Turkey thigh meat.
Example: "Trail Mix" - Contains the following - Ingredients: Turkey Bites: turkey meat Buffalo Bites: buffalo heart Hot Dogs: beef*, water, sea salt, celery juice and/or celery powder, sodium lactate, spices, Onion powder, garlic powder, paprika. *beef used was never administered antibiotics or growth hormones. Vermont Cheddar Cheese: Pasteurized milk, cheese cultures, salt, enzyme. Usually available at "Pet Supply Plus" chain stores. Find a location:
Pet Supplies Plus : Home Page

The Honest Kitchen Treats Locate a store:
Where to Buy Honest Kitchen - Honest Kitchen Stores | The Honest Kitchen
Beams: a natural dehydrated fish dog treat! They’re made from pure, wild-caught Atlantic Catfish* skins, from the clean ocean waters of Iceland, dried into savory, chewy sticks. They’re guaranteed to satisfy the pickiest of pups and are the perfect treat alternative to dried chicken snacks or bully sticks. Beams, like all our products, contain no Chinese ingredients!
Nuzzles: made with duck & cherries.


Hope this helps!
Moms
01-09-2014 09:40 PM
halo2013 Oh I definitely will. If its multi purpose its always beneficial have.

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01-09-2014 09:32 PM
brittanyb28
Quote:
Originally Posted by halo2013 View Post
What's dinovite?

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It is a supplement. You can look it up online at dinovite.com. My friend uses it for her dogs ear problems and it cleared it up fast. Can be used for all sorts of issues. Go to the website and read the information about it and see if you think it will work for you. I have seen really good benefits from it personally.


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01-09-2014 07:31 PM
halo2013
Quote:
Originally Posted by brittanyb28 View Post
Dinovite works like a charm


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What's dinovite?

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01-09-2014 05:59 PM
brittanyb28 Dinovite works like a charm


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01-09-2014 05:18 PM
Heidigsd
Quote:
Originally Posted by good_snow View Post
How do I find a veterinarian specialist who can do a skin test? Do I just call different vets in my area and ask if they can do a skin test?

Thanks!

I would get it done at a dermatologist, you can find one here: https://www.acvd.org/locator/locator.asp
01-09-2014 04:51 PM
Momto2GSDs Hi Good Snow!
Checking for food sensitivities is the best place to start.
Dr. Jean Dodds (Researcher) developed and patened a test called NutriScan. You order the kit, swab some of your dogs saliva per directions and send it back to HemoPet for analysis.....pretty easy and cheaper than allergy testing from a specialist! Many dogs have been helped by this testing! This test will show you what ingredients that your dog is highly sensitive to so that you can find a different food with correct ingredients. BTW....what EXACTLY are you feeding? Food, Treats, Table food? Please list the brand names.

Below is the info.
Here are some specifics of the test:
NutriScan
This test measures antibodies to certain foods in dog saliva. High antibody levels indicate that the dog has a food sensitivity and intolerance to that food or foods. Food intolerance or sensitivity is actually quite common whereas food allergy is rare. In fact, food intolerance is the third most common sensitivity condition in dogs and often can be easily remedied with a change in diet.Dr. Jean Dodds, NutriScan tests for the twenty most commonly ingested foods by dogs to provide you with specific results as to your dog's food intolerances or sensitivities. Since it is a salivary test, you have the convenience to complete the test at home or at your veterinarian’s office. Best of all, you can have the results in approximately two weeks to help you put your dog on the right diet.
Remember, NutriScan is novel and patented and is not testing for food allergies, but rather tests for food sensitivities and intolerance. These are different body immune responses. Food allergy is a more immediate reaction mediated by production of IgE and IgG antibodies. Food sensitivity and intolerance, by contrast, measures a more delayed body response to offending foods by measuring production of IgA and IgM antibodies primarily in mucosal secretions from the bowel.”


Panel1: Beef, Corn, Wheat, Soy, Cow’s Milk, Lamb, Venison/Deer, Chicken, Turkey, White Fish.
Panel 2: Chicken Eggs, Barley, Millet, Oatmeal, Salmon, Rabbit, Rice, Quinoa, Potatoes, Peanuts/Peanut Butter.

$130 for one panel (10 antigens), $250 for two panels (20 antigens). ……I’d get both.


Vet Allergy test cost about $500 for 20 antigens. Check this page for test differences: http://nutriscan.org/the-nutriscan-difference/nutriscan-vs-skin-patchskin-prick-testing.html


Q. How does this test differ from other food “allergy” tests on serum or feces ?
A. Food allergy tests measure antibodies to IgG and IgE in serum or feces. These are typically more acute allergic reactions to foods, whereas NutriScan measures IgA and IgM antibodies on the bowel’s mucosal surface, and thus more directly correlates to symptoms of bowel (GI tract) disease. http://nutriscan.org/the-nutriscan-difference/faqs.html

“NutriScan is a patented novel saliva test for canine food sensitivity and intolerance.” http://hemopet.org/

“This test measures antibodies to certain foods in dog saliva. High antibody levels indicate that the dog has a food sensitivity and intolerance to that food or foods.”

“Food intolerance or sensitivity is actually quite common whereas food allergy is rare. In fact, food intolerance is the third most common sensitivity condition in dogs and often can be easily remedied with a change in diet. For years, though, the difficulty lay in figuring out what foods were problematic – until now. Nutri-Scan is novel and patented and is not testing for food allergies, but rather tests for food sensitivities and intolerance. These are different body immune responses. Food allergy is a more immediate reaction mediated by production of IgE and IgG antibodies. Food sensitivity and intolerance, by contrast, measures a more delayed body response to offending foods by measuring production of IgA and IgM antibodies primarily in mucosal secretions from the bowel.”
http://www.hemopet.org/nutriscan.html

“In contrast to food allergies, food sensitivity and intolerance is more common and can be a long term reaction.” http://nutriscan.org/the-nutriscan-difference.html

For the first time in veterinary history, pets can be diagnosed and treated for food sensitivities on an individual basis. We consider the dog’s age, breed, and size in all of our diagnostic technology. Not all dogs are metabolically and genetically alike and our technology provides for individualized care.” http://nutriscan.org/images/stories/Press_Release_Nutrigenomics.pdf

Nutri-Scan vs Food Elimination Trials: http://nutriscan.org/the-nutriscan-difference/nutriscan-vs-food-elimination-trials.html
Advantages: http://nutriscan.org/images/stories/NutriScan_ADVANTAGE.pdf
Site showing results from testing: http://fidoseofreality.com/does-the-nutriscan-kit-to-solve-dog-food-allergies-work/

Moms
01-09-2014 03:23 PM
sprklnh2o My dog also have allergy issues but it seems environmental. We found that after we clean our carpet the allergy subsides and then comes back gradually. We give him zyrtec which seems to help a lot.
01-09-2014 03:09 PM
good_snow How do I find a veterinarian specialist who can do a skin test? Do I just call different vets in my area and ask if they can do a skin test?

Thanks!
01-07-2014 03:35 PM
dcg9381 I don't mess around with itching anymore. I get them tested by a specialist. You can do skin tests at a specialist or a blood test (kit) at your regular vet. It'll seem expensive, until you add up all the trips you're going to make and meds you're going to try without knowing what is triggering the problem.

Vets will treat with Benedryl and many will eventually move up to steroids. The steroids will typically help, but long term they will do liver damage and shorten your dogs life significantly.

Nothing wrong with trying new foods, new baths, new supplements, but I'd get the tests done.
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