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Topic Review (Newest First)
01-06-2014 10:31 PM
GSDluver4lyfe
Quote:
Originally Posted by gsdsar View Post
I don't have an issue with the growling. The issue is the other dog not respecting it. I would be stepping in and forcing the their to respect the warning and not allow him to steal the other dogs bones.

This is not the GSD issue, it's the little dogs issue. Unfortunately if you don't stop one if them, one may end up hurt.


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I agree. Growling is a form of communication but if the other party is not receptive or choosing to ignore the warning it can escalate and the little dog's safety is a concern. I would seperate them whenever there is something of high value around if the little dog wont respect your GSD's form of communicating. I have a little pom/chi as well as a GSD (both grew up together only a month apart) and the little guy is a little turd sometimes. But they respect each others space and communication. Mace allows Koko to utilize his bossy ways most of the time and just ignores him but just a look from Mace when he's had enough and the other one respects his space. Same thing with the roles reversed. But I am always vigilant when food and certain toys are around. And they are always in my presence when things of value are out.
I dont feel the GSD should get punished simply for growling by getting his bone taken away.
01-06-2014 03:40 PM
Msmaria Sorry, I dont know why it pasted so many times
01-06-2014 03:38 PM
Msmaria Thank You Jax for the info. Now I realize that when I say my dogs dont look at each other when they are eating their bones, I now know that they are head turning.

Fluffy is the Einstein below. Now I know why he tries to cozy up to the other dogs. He also does what ever he can to get the other dogs to drop their bones so he can go in and steal it. He has even distracted my poor old shih tzu and when she reaches around to look at him he jumps over her and takes her bone. My shih tzu doesnt do anything..but Thats where the problems start, when Dexter realizes his bone has been stolen and Fluffy has it. You know, I dont give enough credit to that little dog. But thanks to everyone here Im on to his game now.

WHEN IS IT A PROBLEM? Between Dogs: It is perfectly reasonable for one dog to signal another that his chew bone is HIS chew bone, thank you very much. Appropriate signals are head turns, stares and, depending on a host of other factors, a quiet growl. Appropriate responses are immediate withdrawals or strategic (and often brilliant) attempts by an item-less dog to worm her way into the others good graces. (Not to mention the famous distraction technique of Einsteinian dogs: BARK BARK BARK BARK!!! says the dog who wants the chew bone, vigorously vocalizing at the front window. Dog with bone drops it on the way to join in the barking, while Einstein Dog circles back and gets the bone.) Every owner has to decide what is acceptable in their own household; my criteria are quiet warnings like head turns or stares are acceptable, anything else is discouraged - See more at: Resource Guarding: Treatment and Prevention TheOtherEndoftheLeash
"WHEN IS IT A PROBLEM? Between Dogs: It is perfectly reasonable for one dog to signal another that his chew bone is HIS chew bone, thank you very much. Appropriate signals are head turns, stares and, depending on a host of other factors, a quiet growl. Appropriate responses are immediate withdrawals or strategic (and often brilliant) attempts by an item-less dog to worm her way into the others good graces. (Not to mention the famous distraction technique of Einsteinian dogs: BARK BARK BARK BARK!!! says the dog who wants the chew bone, vigorously vocalizing at the front window. Dog with bone drops it on the way to join in the barking, while Einstein Dog circles back and gets the bone.) Every owner has to decide what is acceptable in their own household; my criteria are quiet warnings like head turns or stares are acceptable, anything else is discouraged"
WHEN IS IT A PROBLEM? Between Dogs: It is perfectly reasonable for one dog to signal another that his chew bone is HIS chew bone, thank you very much. Appropriate signals are head turns, stares and, depending on a host of other factors, a quiet growl. Appropriate responses are immediate withdrawals or strategic (and often brilliant) attempts by an item-less dog to worm her way into the others good graces. (Not to mention the famous distraction technique of Einsteinian dogs: BARK BARK BARK BARK!!! says the dog who wants the chew bone, vigorously vocalizing at the front window. Dog with bone drops it on the way to join in the barking, while Einstein Dog circles back and gets the bone.) Every owner has to decide what is acceptable in their own household; my criteria are quiet warnings like head turns or stares are acceptable, anything else is discouraged - See more at: Resource Guarding: Treatment and Prevention TheOtherEndoftheLeash
WHEN IS IT A PROBLEM? Between Dogs: It is perfectly reasonable for one dog to signal another that his chew bone is HIS chew bone, thank you very much. Appropriate signals are head turns, stares and, depending on a host of other factors, a quiet growl. Appropriate responses are immediate withdrawals or strategic (and often brilliant) attempts by an item-less dog to worm her way into the others good graces. (Not to mention the famous distraction technique of Einsteinian dogs: BARK BARK BARK BARK!!! says the dog who wants the chew bone, vigorously vocalizing at the front window. Dog with bone drops it on the way to join in the barking, while Einstein Dog circles back and gets the bone.) Every owner has to decide what is acceptable in their own household; my criteria are quiet warnings like head turns or stares are acceptable, anything else is discouraged - See more at: Resource Guarding: Treatment and Prevention TheOtherEndoftheLeash
WHEN IS IT A PROBLEM? Between Dogs: It is perfectly reasonable for one dog to signal another that his chew bone is HIS chew bone, thank you very much. Appropriate signals are head turns, stares and, depending on a host of other factors, a quiet growl. Appropriate responses are immediate withdrawals or strategic (and often brilliant) attempts by an item-less dog to worm her way into the others good graces. (Not to mention the famous distraction technique of Einsteinian dogs: BARK BARK BARK BARK!!! says the dog who wants the chew bone, vigorously vocalizing at the front window. Dog with bone drops it on the way to join in the barking, while Einstein Dog circles back and gets the bone.) Every owner has to decide what is acceptable in their own household; my criteria are quiet warnings like head turns or stares are acceptable, anything else is discouraged - See more at: Resource Guarding: Treatment and Prevention TheOtherEndoftheLeash
WHEN IS IT A PROBLEM? Between Dogs: It is perfectly reasonable for one dog to signal another that his chew bone is HIS chew bone, thank you very much. Appropriate signals are head turns, stares and, depending on a host of other factors, a quiet growl. Appropriate responses are immediate withdrawals or strategic (and often brilliant) attempts by an item-less dog to worm her way into the others good graces. (Not to mention the famous distraction technique of Einsteinian dogs: BARK BARK BARK BARK!!! says the dog who wants the chew bone, vigorously vocalizing at the front window. Dog with bone drops it on the way to join in the barking, while Einstein Dog circles back and gets the bone.) Every owner has to decide what is acceptable in their own household; my criteria are quiet warnings like head turns or stares are acceptable, anything else is discouraged - See more at: Resource Guarding: Treatment and Prevention TheOtherEndoftheLeash
01-06-2014 02:59 PM
Msmaria Thank You everyone for the good advice. When I got home from work last night I asked my son to put together a plywood crate for me. I tried putting my "tiny terror" who thinks hes a big dog in Dexters crate. He wanted out and Dexter wanted in..lol

Thank You Jax for the info. Im going to read it right now.
01-05-2014 02:23 PM
Jax08 How to Prevent Resource Guarding in a Multiple-dog Household | Karen Pryor Clicker Training

How to React When Your Dog Begins Resource Guarding Against Other Dogs - Whole Dog Journal Article

Resource Guarding: Treatment and Prevention TheOtherEndoftheLeash

Positively | Victoria Stilwell | Forum ? View topic - LIVING WITH DOG-DOG RESOURCE GUARDING PART 2
01-05-2014 02:13 PM
Jax08
Quote:
Originally Posted by Baillif View Post
I'm with blanket on this one. When we have lots of dogs in the yards at the kennel we keep toys, bones, and food out of the equation because these become flashpoints for dog on dog violence.

Keep them separate when items like that are available and don't continue to allow either of them to practice that behavior.
01-05-2014 02:10 PM
Jax08
Quote:
Originally Posted by llombardo View Post
You put the take away the bone part and no one gets it in bold, but the very next sentence was to give it back once things were under control. Taking it away and giving it back is not punishment because the dog is getting it back. I would also work on the dog that is doing the stealing. There is no reason anyone should be fighting and it should be worked on. Attached is a picture I took of my dogs yesterday...all 6 dogs in the house had an elk antler, all the boys are in the picture, the girls choose to spread out more and are less tolerant of anyone invading their space. But I'm even less tolerant of any of them stealing or growling...I always win and they have learned over time that it gets them nowhere fast.
I understood perfectly what you meant. And in my experience, it escalated the resource guarding.

I'm happy it worked for your dogs but that method will not work for all dogs.
01-05-2014 02:01 PM
llombardo
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jax08 View Post
that back fired on me and escalated Jax's resource guarding. Be very careful doing that. All your GSD might learn is that when the poodle comes at him, he loses his treats.
You put the take away the bone part and no one gets it in bold, but the very next sentence was to give it back once things were under control. Taking it away and giving it back is not punishment because the dog is getting it back. I would also work on the dog that is doing the stealing. There is no reason anyone should be fighting and it should be worked on. Attached is a picture I took of my dogs yesterday...all 6 dogs in the house had an elk antler, all the boys are in the picture, the girls choose to spread out more and are less tolerant of anyone invading their space. But I'm even less tolerant of any of them stealing or growling...I always win and they have learned over time that it gets them nowhere fast.

http://www.germanshepherds.com/forum...1&d=1388948333
01-05-2014 12:49 PM
Baillif I'm with blanket on this one. When we have lots of dogs in the yards at the kennel we keep toys, bones, and food out of the equation because these become flashpoints for dog on dog violence.

Keep them separate when items like that are available and don't continue to allow either of them to practice that behavior.
01-05-2014 11:42 AM
trcy Once my dogs start fighting over toys the entire toy basket gets put in a closed room.

My smallest dog likes to bait the other dogs with a bone or bullie stick. She puts it on the ground and will lay down about 3 feet from it. As soon as another dog comes to sniff or take the item she goes Cujo on them. Anytime I see a bone or chew thing around her I throw it in the tow basket.
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