German Shepherd Dog Forums - Reply to Topic

Increase font size: 0, 10, 25, 50%

GermanShepherds.com is the premier German Shepherd Forum on the internet. Registered Users do not see the above ads.
Thread: Can you really expect your dog a reliable recall when so many things are more interes Reply to Thread
Title:
  
Message:
Trackback
Send Trackbacks to (Separate multiple URLs with spaces):
Post Icons
You may choose an icon for your message from the following list:
 

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the German Shepherd Dog Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
If you do not want to register, fill this field only and the name will be used as user name for your post.
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



Additional Options
Miscellaneous Options

Topic Review (Newest First)
01-03-2014 05:18 PM
GSDluver4lyfe My dog has very high prey drive as well and I'm quite aware of the fact that capping his drives is extremely difficult for him so I watch him and our surroundings intently. The second I see his drive escalating I call him back or give him a reminder or distraction (like scrapping my foot on the ground or jingling his collar in my hands, to get his focus off whatever it is and that usually works). With that being said Ive called him off squirrels beavers posums dogs etc with no problem but I do have to use my stern voice to break through his focus but I do remember that he is an animal and nothing is ever 100%. I do the best with what I have and remain vigilant and watchful of my dog and his behavior. And I am quite satisfied with his dependability off leash.
12-27-2013 07:50 AM
G-burg Sure you can expect a reliable recall and train for it... BUT we're talking about living breathing creatures that sometimes have their own agenda, impulses and can easily get caught up in the moment and choose not to listen!
12-27-2013 12:57 AM
selzer
Quote:
Originally Posted by boomer11 View Post
positive training is fine and dandy but its really more about proofing. for me personally i train with positive methods and make my dog think im the most fun thing in the world BUT if he doesnt come there is consequences. i mean if i needed a rock solid recall like a military bomb sniffing dog i wouldnt want to count on me being more fun than every single thing the dog runs into. whether the dog is excited, scared, nervous, eager, etc come should mean come. and come means come immediately or its spanking time!!
Well, I guess different dogs are different. Mine come immedieately, every time, whether I am standing near a crate or kennel to put them in, or getting ready to take them somewhere, or if there is another dog or rabbit or squirrel or deer, or whatever. And it has never been spanking time. Spanks and COME don't go together. When my dog is loose in a busy parking lot, I do not want them to associate COME with a spanking. Nope. I want them to associate Come, with GottogettoSuzieNow! And it works. Well it works for me. Maybe it is genetic obedience. Too bad that doesn't kick in for heeling though.
12-26-2013 10:46 PM
boomer11 positive training is fine and dandy but its really more about proofing. for me personally i train with positive methods and make my dog think im the most fun thing in the world BUT if he doesnt come there is consequences. i mean if i needed a rock solid recall like a military bomb sniffing dog i wouldnt want to count on me being more fun than every single thing the dog runs into. whether the dog is excited, scared, nervous, eager, etc come should mean come. and come means come immediately or its spanking time!!
12-26-2013 10:07 PM
Wild Wolf
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vagus View Post
That's horrible! Congrats to you for being able to protect your dog. I'm starting to think it's time I start walking with something too, as I've had some near horrible experiences that have left me quite anxious. Mace/pepper spray/tazors etc. are all illegal where I live, so a solid stick may just have to do. I've heard of people just keeping little travel size deodorant sprays on them too. I'm seriously impressed that you were physically able to step in though! Great going
I'm lucky because I'm moving real soon out of this neighbourhood - but we do enough training, hiking, working, and running that I don't really need to take him for a walk around the neighbourhood much... when I do, something usually goes wrong. Haha. I will not leave without my stick anymore!
12-26-2013 09:57 PM
Vagus That's horrible! Congrats to you for being able to protect your dog. I'm starting to think it's time I start walking with something too, as I've had some near horrible experiences that have left me quite anxious. Mace/pepper spray/tazors etc. are all illegal where I live, so a solid stick may just have to do. I've heard of people just keeping little travel size deodorant sprays on them too. I'm seriously impressed that you were physically able to step in though! Great going
12-26-2013 09:45 PM
Wild Wolf
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vagus View Post
what happened after you got your dog to platz? Did the owner show up? How did the situation resolve?
The owner was out on the lawn, he stood there and made ME break the two males up. The husky didn't even have a collar so I had to bear wrestle the thing. He grabbed my dog's leash, who was holding his platz after one command.

It was kind of funny, because even though Hunter went immediately into a slow platz, he still was wearing a dominant aggressive expression on his face and snarling - slowly laying down... haha.

I told the guy to drop my male's leash, and he was hesitating, and I had to impolitely inform him that my dog would not break his platz. The guy tried to walk his dog away by the tail, while it continued to try to break away to attack my dog again.

I put Hunter behind me in a platz and stood in a battle ready stand until the dog was inside...

edit: I turned the corner and called humane society/by-law right after and filed a phone report.

Good thing I have a background in martial arts and rugby... controlling a dog physically when it wants to kill another dog (not to mention it tried to bite me in the face) is miserable..

Now... I carry a thick bamboo cane everywhere I go. Next dog who succumbs to his owner's foolishness and lack of control will unfortunately get to know my cane personally. I'm done being attacked... it's me or them. Unfortunately...
12-26-2013 07:47 PM
Vagus
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wild Wolf View Post
as we walked around the corner the dog charged us and attacked my dog. I lifted the husky up in a strangle hold
what happened after you got your dog to platz? Did the owner show up? How did the situation resolve?
12-26-2013 03:44 PM
David Taggart
Quote:
But even through repetition, does your dog always have the option or does it get so engrained that he just does it without thinking....so many things are more exciting than treats....
I would exlude here any exhibition of agressive behaviour as an urge to protect, only that ones which is to attack. Though, sometimes it could be difficult to understand which was to attack and which one to protect, because the best defence is attacking the enemy. When our dogs are young puppies, and later on when they are 7-10 months old, they play and instinctively polish these maneuveres mainly of the predatory nature. When they are two years old - their play becomes a serious business once they met true agression from the dog they had attacked not very seriously. Thus will do every male. He could be scared of stronger predators of his kind and feel a prey himself, hoping to get better by practicing in attacks of smaller males, or, he could feel a hero, ignoring the small and the cats, and attack only those he consideres they match his statue.
If you trained recall when your dog was a puppy playing with other puppies - he would be still reluctant to leave his engaging game at its hottest when he is 10 months, would turn to you immediately when he is 1 and half years old at any moment, and would come close to you to look into your eyes in anticipation of your command.
If it didn't happen, the best thing you can do is to go back to square one - recall him at the moment when he is most engaged in some play with other dogs. Muzzle him, don't be ashamed of his attacks and train recall in live situations ( just avoid small dogs, being muzzled he will learn to use his claws faster than you may imagine). Muzzle is a good protection for his face as well as a collar studded with spikes.
One exercise with a ball may help - ask him to stop in a mid way to still running ball and stay a minute or so, and continue to chase it by your command.
Keeping him in a sitting position would calm you dog down when other dog approaches and you see him exited in a certain manner, talk to him in a quiet firm and really low voice with your back to the enemy, any high pitched tunes definitely will worsen the situation.
Some dogs are more difficult to train reacall in such situations only because there is nothing else exiting in their lives: nobody take them to the club to exercise their predatory impulses in combat with a decoy, nobody made them ball mad, they are not exhausted running beside a horse, so, they get use to be intoxicated with their own adrenaline rush, dogs could be adrenaline junkies too, do you know that?
12-26-2013 02:33 PM
selzer Yes, they can't hear you.

One day Rushie and Dubya got into it outside, and I managed to pull Dubya off and into a kennel when I heard WWIII start in the house. Ick!

There I was IN the kennel with Dubya who still wanted to EAT Rushie, who was just on the other side of the gate just as happy to EAT Dubya, and the real danger, the bitches are in the house fighting.

I squeezed myself out of the kennel keeping both boys apart, and Rush turned and sped into the doggy door to join the fray inside. I got in there and there were three mostly grown puppy bitches, two young adult bitches, and my older girl all going at it, and Rushie.

I don't even think in such circumstances, I just do. I quickly grabbed Rush and each of the puppies who were not really intent on the fight. And next Babs who was about 2 at the time, and crated her. I had a bunch of crates in the sun room, and I just went about filling them up, until it was just Arwen and Jenna, my two dominant bitches going at it for real. I grabbed one of them by the leg, and pulled her into the house bleeding until I could get the metal baby gate between them. I got them separated. Blood pressure soaring, adrenalin flowing.

It was then, that I decided that there really wasn't any good reason that 8 dogs needed to run around together in a huge disorganized pack. They were all pretty much trained and in classes. That year I titled six of those dogs.

Dog fights are grusome, horrible things, and I avoid them like the plague.
This thread has more than 10 replies. Click here to review the whole thread.

Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 12:41 PM.



Powered by vBulletin® Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
SEO by vBSEO 3.3.2
PetGuide.com
Basset.net DobermanTalk.com GoldenRetrieverForum.com OurBeagleWorld.com
BoxerForums.com DogForums.com GoPitbull.com PoodleForum.com
BulldogBreeds.com FishForums.com HavaneseForum.com SpoiledMaltese.com
CatForum.com GermanShepherds.com Labradoodle-dogs.net YorkieForum.com
Chihuahua-People.com RetrieverBreeds.com