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Topic Review (Newest First)
12-28-2013 04:31 PM
rjThor
Quote:
Originally Posted by martemchik View Post
You'll either have to redirect him, and keep him in a pretty solid heal with either a toy or treats while he's walking so that he completely ignores the fence and the dog park, or you'll have to use strong corrections when he does step out of line and let him know that the behavior he's exhibiting is not acceptable.

Truthfully...get a trainer. Someone that can show you what you need to do. I'm not sure how you allowed an on leash dog to jump up on a fence if it was something you were working on. Not sure why you were that close to the fence in the first place if that is what you were trying to avoid. Keep him on a 6 foot leash or shorter, keep the fence 7 feet away or more.

Nothing should happen "so fast." Always expect something to happen. Know that your dog has these issues and what you need to work on. Don't allow those things to keep occurring. Nothing your dog does should ever surprise you and you need to either redirect or correct (forcefully) before he decides to do something you don't want him to do. It's pretty easy to read a dog and see when its going to be up to something not good.
You are absolutely right I had him to close to the fence and even my teenage son told me so, but I wanted to see what kind of reaction I would get from him an aggressive one or one of just view them n not do anything, wasn't expecting him to try n jump up n leap toward the fence that was definitely my fault, a mistake I will not make again or get him as close to the fence as I did the last time, matter of fact I won't take him around the dog park we will just walk on the trail that leads US to our vehicle from here on out. Thanks for your input. Adding a couple of pics of Thor using the ladder to climb up n one to show where he stood at 1 1/2yrs. old to the gate. Thank you for your time and input I greatly appreciate it.
12-28-2013 04:19 PM
rjThor
Quote:
Originally Posted by David Taggart View Post
It happens with many owners that this "No" is adressed to dozens of things. Dog is much more intelligent creature than many people think, GSDs are scaringly intelligent, but ... Dogs cannot put similarities into concepts, they are deprived of this ability to generalize. They have superb memory, and there is a simple rule: you can use many commands for one and the same thing ( that's why it is easy to train dogs even 2-3 different foreighn languages for the same), but you shouldn't use one and the same command for different things. This "no" is the biggest mistake ever created by trainers. The best what your dog can get - is his guess that you want him to do something else, or he is going to be punished in a minute. In the first case it replaces your recall, in the second he understands the punishment as a necessary routine, something that happens regulary and is not associated with his wrongdoing. Try to avoid this "No" and repace it with more sensible "Stay", "Sit" or whatever.
Anything that moves fast enough could be an object to practice his predatory skills. Running joggers, running children, cats, dogs and birds. The majority of dogs give up chasing kids or adult humans because nothing what their predatory instinct requires to happen happens - no combat with the beast, it never becomes their prey ( except in the Schutz protection training), that's why dogs are so quickly satisfied of simply frightening people. My previous dog liked to do that, running back happy, wagging her tail "I made that old chap piss his pants!" In this case, I don't make any difference whom your dog wants to scare or kill, he is a predator, and stray dogs are known to eat cats. With time he will try to add humans to his list of prey, if he finds them worth of, especially those who are likely to respond agressively to his "probes".
No forbidding commands, because they would be understood as your corrections to his hunting games. He was successful not only once, and your "no" sounds "go on" for him, if you tried to punish him verbally after it sonds like "You should have grabbed his neck, not his tail!" High pitched tunes in your voice just tell him there is something to celebrate. Instead, your calmity and really low firm, but not loud voice would disencourage him. Muzzle him and walk deliberately in places where you can meet dogs and cats - off leash. He must heel, sit before a cat, and walk further still heeling. Don't pay attention to anything, but to him performing these commands. I promise you success in a year time. Othewise, you know... Some cat owner may nurse an idea to kill your dog. God forbid he tests a human - and you will start opening your wallet first, and lose your dog in the end.
Thanks David, you brought up a lot of interesting points, and I will definitely take them into consideration, I do appreciate it, the only one I strongly disagree with is the people as prey, Thor has always been around family n and even when we have visitors he's always good, has never shown any aggression towards me or my son when feeding him or trying to take his food bowl away from him, he's also been around lil baby's n will sniff them n get his curiosity out of the way n will lay by them or around the crib, I do have a niece that enjoys hugging him n even at that doesn't seem to mind she's 3yrs. old n he loves to follow her around the house along with the other kids. Thanks for all the other advice I truly appreciate it.
12-28-2013 03:41 PM
martemchik
Quote:
Originally Posted by rjThor View Post
Actually he was on his leash when he leaped up at the 6ft fence, it happened real fast since we were close to the fence and I had given his leash some slack, wouldn't even consider having him around the dog park without it, matter of fact when we leave the trails is when I put him back on his leash so we can walk him n cool him off from his running n let him dry off from the ponds he likes to jump into. U right about my teenager, i'm sure it would have been just a matter of time before he would have done it anyways. Have tried working with him and the fence walking him around it with the leash but he knows he's on a leash and wont test me and if he does I do reenforce on his leash and tell him no, maybe i'm not using the right word if you have any other suggestions please let me know, would greatly appreciate it. Thanks.
You'll either have to redirect him, and keep him in a pretty solid heal with either a toy or treats while he's walking so that he completely ignores the fence and the dog park, or you'll have to use strong corrections when he does step out of line and let him know that the behavior he's exhibiting is not acceptable.

Truthfully...get a trainer. Someone that can show you what you need to do. I'm not sure how you allowed an on leash dog to jump up on a fence if it was something you were working on. Not sure why you were that close to the fence in the first place if that is what you were trying to avoid. Keep him on a 6 foot leash or shorter, keep the fence 7 feet away or more.

Nothing should happen "so fast." Always expect something to happen. Know that your dog has these issues and what you need to work on. Don't allow those things to keep occurring. Nothing your dog does should ever surprise you and you need to either redirect or correct (forcefully) before he decides to do something you don't want him to do. It's pretty easy to read a dog and see when its going to be up to something not good.
12-28-2013 03:18 PM
David Taggart
Quote:
and tell him no
It happens with many owners that this "No" is adressed to dozens of things. Dog is much more intelligent creature than many people think, GSDs are scaringly intelligent, but ... Dogs cannot put similarities into concepts, they are deprived of this ability to generalize. They have superb memory, and there is a simple rule: you can use many commands for one and the same thing ( that's why it is easy to train dogs even 2-3 different foreighn languages for the same), but you shouldn't use one and the same command for different things. This "no" is the biggest mistake ever created by trainers. The best what your dog can get - is his guess that you want him to do something else, or he is going to be punished in a minute. In the first case it replaces your recall, in the second he understands the punishment as a necessary routine, something that happens regulary and is not associated with his wrongdoing. Try to avoid this "No" and repace it with more sensible "Stay", "Sit" or whatever.
Anything that moves fast enough could be an object to practice his predatory skills. Running joggers, running children, cats, dogs and birds. The majority of dogs give up chasing kids or adult humans because nothing what their predatory instinct requires to happen happens - no combat with the beast, it never becomes their prey ( except in the Schutz protection training), that's why dogs are so quickly satisfied of simply frightening people. My previous dog liked to do that, running back happy, wagging her tail "I made that old chap piss his pants!" In this case, I don't make any difference whom your dog wants to scare or kill, he is a predator, and stray dogs are known to eat cats. With time he will try to add humans to his list of prey, if he finds them worth of, especially those who are likely to respond agressively to his "probes".
No forbidding commands, because they would be understood as your corrections to his hunting games. He was successful not only once, and your "no" sounds "go on" for him, if you tried to punish him verbally after it sonds like "You should have grabbed his neck, not his tail!" High pitched tunes in your voice just tell him there is something to celebrate. Instead, your calmity and really low firm, but not loud voice would disencourage him. Muzzle him and walk deliberately in places where you can meet dogs and cats - off leash. He must heel, sit before a cat, and walk further still heeling. Don't pay attention to anything, but to him performing these commands. I promise you success in a year time. Othewise, you know... Some cat owner may nurse an idea to kill your dog. God forbid he tests a human - and you will start opening your wallet first, and lose your dog in the end.
12-28-2013 01:40 PM
rjThor
Quote:
Originally Posted by martemchik View Post
Why did you allow him to jump onto a 6 ft fence? That is something I would never allow. Once they know they can do it, they'll keep doing it. You should've been close enough, or he should've been on leash and you should've been able to prevent him from even getting close to the fence.

Without proper intervention by you, and not allowing your dog to do those things, he's going to keep doing them. And I'm guessing your kid jumping the fence is not where he got the idea to jump, he just did it one day, and now he knows he can do it because no one has stopped him from doing it. My dog has seen me jump the 4 foot fence, he still doesn't do it himself.
Actually he was on his leash when he leaped up at the 6ft fence, it happened real fast since we were close to the fence and I had given his leash some slack, wouldn't even consider having him around the dog park without it, matter of fact when we leave the trails is when I put him back on his leash so we can walk him n cool him off from his running n let him dry off from the ponds he likes to jump into. U right about my teenager, i'm sure it would have been just a matter of time before he would have done it anyways. Have tried working with him and the fence walking him around it with the leash but he knows he's on a leash and wont test me and if he does I do reenforce on his leash and tell him no, maybe i'm not using the right word if you have any other suggestions please let me know, would greatly appreciate it. Thanks.
12-28-2013 01:25 PM
mspiker03 Besides getting a trainer, I would get some long training leads (like 40 ft ones) so your dog can have some freedom and you can maintain control (and train while on walks/in your yard). Sure, they can be a pain on hikes, but if the alternative is attacking other dogs, it is well worth the hassle.

But sounds like a trainer would be a wise investment.


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12-28-2013 01:21 PM
martemchik
Quote:
Originally Posted by rjThor View Post
Thanks, makes me feel alot better I was thinking I had done something wrong while raising him. The fence I have is also 4ft, but i've actually taken him to the dog park recently, it's by the trails I take him so I wanted to see how he would react from the outside, and he actually surprised me, he was able to leap up to the top of the 6ft fence. He actually saw my teenager jump the fence when he was under 1yrs old and thats where he got that idea. I'm not happy or do I condone Thor about the cats, it was traumatic n gruesome what he's done with them, and it did bother me, so I do want the members to know I don't condone it, never have. He does have a high prey drive on the trails he will chase the deer or the rabbits or even a bird that happens to be close by. Thanks for your input.
Why did you allow him to jump onto a 6 ft fence? That is something I would never allow. Once they know they can do it, they'll keep doing it. You should've been close enough, or he should've been on leash and you should've been able to prevent him from even getting close to the fence.

Without proper intervention by you, and not allowing your dog to do those things, he's going to keep doing them. And I'm guessing your kid jumping the fence is not where he got the idea to jump, he just did it one day, and now he knows he can do it because no one has stopped him from doing it. My dog has seen me jump the 4 foot fence, he still doesn't do it himself.
12-28-2013 12:42 PM
rjThor Thanks, makes me feel alot better I was thinking I had done something wrong while raising him. The fence I have is also 4ft, but i've actually taken him to the dog park recently, it's by the trails I take him so I wanted to see how he would react from the outside, and he actually surprised me, he was able to leap up to the top of the 6ft fence. He actually saw my teenager jump the fence when he was under 1yrs old and thats where he got that idea. I'm not happy or do I condone Thor about the cats, it was traumatic n gruesome what he's done with them, and it did bother me, so I do want the members to know I don't condone it, never have. He does have a high prey drive on the trails he will chase the deer or the rabbits or even a bird that happens to be close by. Thanks for your input.
12-28-2013 12:34 PM
martemchik The thing with cats is prey drive. There's no reason to try and understand it, just work the problem you have. The dog cannot be around cats. My dog cannot be around cats. I don't try to train it out of him, I just avoid cats. We know we will never be able to have cats and I don't bring him anywhere that cats are roaming free. They're prey. He wants to chase, kill, and eat them. It's just a natural instinct.

The fence thing...teach him to not jump it. Correct him for trying to jump the fence. Don't let him out of your yard. If you can't teach him to not jump the fence...keep him inside and only let him out when you're watching him. I have a 4 foot chain link fence...in theory my dog can easily jump it. He doesn't know that he can, so he doesn't try. There's also no reason for him to do so, and so he doesn't. If I see him putting his front paws up on the fence (standing up) I correct him and make sure he knows not to do that.
12-28-2013 12:15 PM
rjThor Thank you will look for the book, I don't understand the cat part, he was raised around a few cats that i saw him around at the breeders, so i'm really puzzled by him, I did buy him alot of furry toys and alot of tennis balls when he was a puppy so not sure if the furry toys led him 2 them, I don't let my dog out, he lives inside the only time he's out is when i walk him or take him on some trails, or put him on his runner so he can enjoy some of the weather outside, he's only 2yrs old so he's very active and honestly he's easily distracted by other animals, so I don't trust him around the neighborhood, would hate for him 2 get run over, or picked up by animal control. I now have custody of my nephew n nieces along with my son, my son knows his dog very well, but my other teens have not gotten used to him as far as closing the storm doors all the way, n he looks for those opportunities to run out the doors n run around the neighborhood, so i'm working with them also as far as getting used to Thor and his sneaky ways.
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