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Thread: Can other dogs be a bad influence? Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
12-26-2013 11:58 AM
Dainerra in "How Dogs Think" they cite several experiments of pups learning different behaviors by observing dogs and humans.

In one experiment, dogs learned the names of different toys simply by watching humans handle the object. People handed the toy back and forth commenting "Look at the hammer" "that is a nice hammer" "would you like the hammer back" "yes thank you for the hammer" and so on while the dog watched. The dog was taken into another room and shown a selection of toys and asked to "find the hammer" The dog recognized the correct object after only one episode of watching the humans with a toy hammer.

Dogs also can learn to solve mazes or puzzles by watching humans.
Puppies who watched their dam perform search patterns while they were younger performed as good on evaluations as dogs who had been in training for several months.

There are several different studies that show that, yes, it is possible for a dog to be a bad influence on another dog. However, with careful socialization and training, I think that you could counteract the bad influence without any issue.
12-24-2013 06:19 PM
Cassidy's Mom
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sansa's Mom View Post
If my dog jumps on me, I turn to the side and then step back, tell her "down" as I am doing it, and then make her sit-stay.
I hope you have a different command for laying down on the floor/ground? I like to use "off" as my no jumping command, which is also applicable for getting off furniture, or taking paws off countertops or the other dog, since I use "down" for laying down.
12-24-2013 03:47 PM
helensdisturbed
Quote:
Originally Posted by llombardo View Post
She is only 12 weeks old, I got my female at that age and she was just like that...then she came out of her shell
Noooooo!!!!


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12-23-2013 10:02 PM
Lilie
Quote:
Originally Posted by jocoyn View Post
They absolutely do learn from each other and the best dog to expose your puppy to is a few STABLE adult dogs.
This is sooo true! My GSD was 3 when I brought home my Lacy puppy. My GSD is a stable, solid, quiet dog. My Lacy is a crack puppy. However, he is solid as a rock with OB commands and especially recall. Truly, because when I asked my GSD for a behavior and rewarded, my Lacy learned what behavior would provide rewards. Recall is 100%, he never learned he could fail a recall.
12-23-2013 09:53 PM
WateryTart
Quote:
Originally Posted by martemchik View Post
A few play dates will not teach your dog those bad behaviors. Spending a few hours a week with a dog like that will not teach your dog that what it does is alright. Thinks like reactivity, submissive/excitement urinating, are also not passed on from dog to dog.

If your pup were to live with this type of dog, it would tend to pick up that behavior because if you didn't teach it to your older dog...you probably aren't going to teach it to your younger dog. It's going to take a lot of time spent with a dog in order for a younger dog to pick up on the "trainable" bad habits. The flat out temperament issues...probably won't get picked up.

Your friends dog sounds stable...it just hasn't been trained. It's not a dangerous dog and is unlikely to hurt your puppy during play/interaction. There is no reason to avoid this dog just because it hasn't had the training YOU believe it should have. By that standard, my dog wouldn't be able to hang out with 95% of dogs out there.

OP...open your mind to other training methods. Just because that's what you were taught when you were young, doesn't make it right. I find that the most effective way to train a dog to not jump is to catch its front paws and not let go until the dog sits or lays down because it's "given up" the fight. Dogs don't like to be restrained, so it will learn that if I jump up...I won't have the freedom and so jumping has a negative consequence. It took like 5 greetings for my dog to catch the drift and he has never jumped again. Some people do this technique but also kick the dog's legs out from under them...but that can cause damage to the dog's legs or hips when they fall on them. I wouldn't recommend doing that.
I will be totally honest: I am not going to change what I do with this dog. This works for me. I don't get knocked over and the dog's claws don't snag my clothing or whatnot. We will have to agree to disagree there!

It's good to hear your perspective on what does work. Thanks for your response! I'll certainly keep it in mind.
12-23-2013 11:44 AM
martemchik A few play dates will not teach your dog those bad behaviors. Spending a few hours a week with a dog like that will not teach your dog that what it does is alright. Thinks like reactivity, submissive/excitement urinating, are also not passed on from dog to dog.

If your pup were to live with this type of dog, it would tend to pick up that behavior because if you didn't teach it to your older dog...you probably aren't going to teach it to your younger dog. It's going to take a lot of time spent with a dog in order for a younger dog to pick up on the "trainable" bad habits. The flat out temperament issues...probably won't get picked up.

Your friends dog sounds stable...it just hasn't been trained. It's not a dangerous dog and is unlikely to hurt your puppy during play/interaction. There is no reason to avoid this dog just because it hasn't had the training YOU believe it should have. By that standard, my dog wouldn't be able to hang out with 95% of dogs out there.

OP...open your mind to other training methods. Just because that's what you were taught when you were young, doesn't make it right. I find that the most effective way to train a dog to not jump is to catch its front paws and not let go until the dog sits or lays down because it's "given up" the fight. Dogs don't like to be restrained, so it will learn that if I jump up...I won't have the freedom and so jumping has a negative consequence. It took like 5 greetings for my dog to catch the drift and he has never jumped again. Some people do this technique but also kick the dog's legs out from under them...but that can cause damage to the dog's legs or hips when they fall on them. I wouldn't recommend doing that.
12-23-2013 11:12 AM
llombardo
Quote:
Originally Posted by helensdisturbed View Post
I think that your dogs base behaviour is all that matters. My 12 week old bitch attends training classes and all the other puppies are a bit naughty, jumping up, barking, running off , the works. But, they are medium to small breeds, I cannot afford to let her behave like that as she's getting bigger now. Luckily, she is very calm and easy to train, and not overly interested in other dogs , she will have a play and a sniff but she will always return to me when called. I feel a bit guilty as she's really good, the others are nuts! Her mum and dad were very calm so surely this behaviour must be inherited?.


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She is only 12 weeks old, I got my female at that age and she was just like that...then she came out of her shell
12-23-2013 11:10 AM
llombardo I believe they do. A good example is my golden retriever puppy that now plays like he is a GSD. But he has also learned his sits and downs by watching them.
12-23-2013 04:07 AM
jocoyn They absolutely do learn from each other and the best dog to expose your puppy to is a few STABLE adult dogs.
12-23-2013 01:30 AM
helensdisturbed I think that your dogs base behaviour is all that matters. My 12 week old bitch attends training classes and all the other puppies are a bit naughty, jumping up, barking, running off , the works. But, they are medium to small breeds, I cannot afford to let her behave like that as she's getting bigger now. Luckily, she is very calm and easy to train, and not overly interested in other dogs , she will have a play and a sniff but she will always return to me when called. I feel a bit guilty as she's really good, the others are nuts! Her mum and dad were very calm so surely this behaviour must be inherited?.


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