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Thread: Puppy Protective? Reply to Thread
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Topic Review (Newest First)
12-03-2013 07:45 PM
My5dogs Haha I have 5 dogs the mouth on your wife's arm is nothing to be concerned about. She wants in on the action I deal with this daily. It's all good
12-03-2013 07:39 PM
Greybeards
Athena

Athena comes from a working line and she has handled herself in any situation i have put her She has not shown fear or aggression in new situations she has encountered

I am telling you this because I think this speaks to her overall temperment and stability

I have had shepards for 25years but consider myself a newbie and I could certainly be wrong

I hope that she is just excited and wants to join in

I really do appreciate the time everyone has taken to respond to my questions

Thanks

Paul
12-03-2013 10:42 AM
Baillif You could be right about the tickling incident too. I'm sort of inclined to agree with you but we are just going off what we saw in writing. Hard to know for sure without seeing it.
12-03-2013 10:38 AM
hunterisgreat
Quote:
Originally Posted by carmspack View Post
second Baillif .

This is part of the canine bond and the ability to empathize , which a "kennel" dog does not have to that extent. This was one of the things demonstrated on the Nature of Things show with research coming out of Sweden and Hungary . Unfortunately the link I provided was available to view by Canadians only???

Pretend you are crying and the dog will be concerned.

Act hostile to someone (your decoy) and the dog will share the emotions and act upon them .

Not to be fooled around with though because for the dog it is real and if you sucker the dog into acting this way , out of concern , then you can't punish them for it .
the ability of a dog to read a person, is why i bet it was just an excited pup wanting to share in the play. i think only a very nervy dog would interpret tickling laughter as actual violence. Consider that its hard enough to find good helpers who can convince a dog they are actually a threat and not just a playmate... goes the same way. When friends have tried to "rough house" with me to see what my dogs would do, the dogs were never convinced... my female jumps in the mix to play rough too, my male usually goes and gets his favorite toy and shoves it in the mix... same thing in either though, they recognize play and want to engage in it.
12-03-2013 10:25 AM
Wild Wolf Agree 100% with Bailiff and Carmen.

Dogs, as pack animals, depending on their rank drive/place in your pack (this is especially significant for puppies who lean towards a submissive side until sexual maturity begins) can take what us wolf people call "omega position" in which the dog tries to "appease" and "interrupt" any seemingly negative behaviour. This behaviour in dogs is critical in preventing serious fights/issues.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZSOsoqVWQFo

At around 10 seconds a more dominant animal begins a status display over the one wolf who was originally dominating the submissive wolf, and the other wolf begins displaying "omega" behaviour by trying to appease the higher rank wolf and "interrupt" the situation even if it is relatively calm. "Omega" behaviour prevents things from escalating.

It could be this, or as others say it could even be resource guarding... depends heavily on the behaviour of your dog.
12-03-2013 10:15 AM
MichaelE I activated that behavior in Lisl one time. Scared the helper and I won't be experimenting with her hot button again.
12-03-2013 08:27 AM
carmspack second Baillif .

This is part of the canine bond and the ability to empathize , which a "kennel" dog does not have to that extent. This was one of the things demonstrated on the Nature of Things show with research coming out of Sweden and Hungary . Unfortunately the link I provided was available to view by Canadians only???

Pretend you are crying and the dog will be concerned.

Act hostile to someone (your decoy) and the dog will share the emotions and act upon them .

Not to be fooled around with though because for the dog it is real and if you sucker the dog into acting this way , out of concern , then you can't punish them for it .
12-03-2013 08:20 AM
Baillif Not to sound like you know who, but to a certain extent part of the dogs pack drive and instincts wants to achieve balance and harmony. So it is a very common thing for a dog to intervene in what it perceives as physical altercations between family members in an attempt to break it up. If I went after my girlfriend aggressively my dogs would step in to stop me. If she went after me the same way they would step in to stop her. Usually by high pitched protest barks, or gentle mouthing or the head on the arm thing.

As long as he isn't laying a real bite down and is being gentle about it I wouldn't be terribly concerned about the behavior, but I would be very cautious about going out of my way to try to activate it, unless I was using it in sport defense of handler exercises or something like that, and even then the dog is trained to do it under context of command and not just make a decision to bite on its own.


This behavior is not to be confused with resource guarding though. If your dog tries to start something just because they are sitting near you or something like that, then you need to correct it.
12-03-2013 07:58 AM
hunterisgreat She was just reflecting your excitement. Remember dogs play with their mouths.
12-03-2013 07:50 AM
Sri Some of our actions in dog body language can come off as mildly threatening, or more. And ofcourse dogs do feel protective towards their pack. Or they could just be excited and want to join in the play.

When this happened with ours, we let him know it is okay by hugging each other and throwing treats to him at the same time. A little later we progressed to asking him for a sit when he approached us while we were hugging or playing and throwing him the treats. Now he is fine with us being physical with each other. He will still approach us to check things out if we get a little rough, but we say 'its okay' and he understands.
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